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Another Rattle Can Paint Question


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#16 HALFSCALE OFFLINE  

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Posted September 06, 2012 - 10:15 PM

As Troy said , don't put water on a paint job right away, it will lift it as quick as if you put gas on it. but running water over a paint job a day or so after being painted helps wash the solvents away. Quite a few years ago I had painted a fire truck with Sikkens, and a day after I painted it we sat it outside and we had a steady rain on it for a day. A couple of weeks later the engine was sitting at a major fire along side three other trucks from other fire companies, they were way too close. Well the other trucks needed re painted and the one with the freshest paint job just needed washed and the black came right off.
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#17 Salatino OFFLINE  

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Posted September 08, 2012 - 11:11 AM

What about if your parts have been painted for lets say a week or more? lol does it work after they been painted that long? As far as helping them harden up a lil? I also put my coats on extremely thin,almost looks like overspray on the first coat or 2 , I usually end up with 3-4 coats a primer and 5-6 coats a color. I usually let the primer cure atleast 3-4 days once its all the way dry. Somtimes up to a week or 2 depending on what I'm doin. I guess all thats left to do is just try it and see what happens. lol Cant hurt it any,

#18 wawcub47 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 08, 2012 - 08:46 PM

I have warmed my rattle cans to speed up the drying time.i just run some warm water in the sink, set the can in it for a few seconds. them shake the can. as you shake ,you will feel the temp change in the can.it will actually get cool, then set in back in the warm water and repeat untill the can is as warm as the water, then spray.always use your common sense, dont use water thats hot to the touch, and dont leave can in for too long. the key is shaking the can to mix the heat within the can.

#19 whst400 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 08:23 AM

Your paint is tacky because the outer surface dried faster than the underlying layers. The coats were sprayed just a wee bit too thick or with not enough time between coats.
An OLD trick to avoid this is to shine an infrared light on it. The rays will heat the substrate and cause the underlying coats to off gas more quickly. That's the process Wheel Horse used for decades.
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#20 VSTROM803 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 27, 2012 - 07:02 PM

How many coats of paint is adequate? I put two on my DB hood. Is this enough if I have uniform coverage?

#21 whst400 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 28, 2012 - 08:40 PM

How many coats of paint is adequate? I put two on my DB hood. Is this enough if I have uniform coverage?

Any answer to that question is really open to personal opinion. If you have complete coverage with two coats and the surface suits you visually then there is not much need to add more. Most factory paint jobs are in the range of 3 to 4 mils thick.
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#22 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2012 - 08:46 PM

I go with a minimum of 4 coats, but I don't primer.
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#23 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2012 - 12:43 AM

How many coats of paint is adequate? I put two on my DB hood. Is this enough if I have uniform coverage?


Orginally your DB hood was dip painted in a huge tank with an over head chain line that brought the parts in and took them out. In reading some of the employee newsletters of the time, they found a huge amount of parts in the bottom of it, when it was cleaned out. Sometime about 1959 they went to using an electro-static line for the hoods and frames of the new riding tractors. No info on wether the walkers used it too. 59' is also the first you see of any primer being used in the DB line and it always seems to be tied to a tractors painted in the bronze or gold colors.
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#24 VSTROM803 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2012 - 07:40 PM

Orginally your DB hood was dip painted in a huge tank with an over head chain line that brought the parts in and took them out. In reading some of the employee newsletters of the time, they found a huge amount of parts in the bottom of it, when it was cleaned out. Sometime about 1959 they went to using an electro-static line for the hoods and frames of the new riding tractors. No info on wether the walkers used it too. 59' is also the first you see of any primer being used in the DB line and it always seems to be tied to a tractors painted in the bronze or gold colors.


Thanks. That is something that's interesting. If the hood I started with had no primer it's pretty remarkable how well it has held up.

I used 1-2 coats of primer with 2 coats of rattle can Rustoleum paint. I hope that is enough. I wasn't trying to get show quality, just a nice clean working tractor that will last.

#25 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted October 03, 2012 - 12:29 AM

I presume this only applies to rattle cans...I work at a Major Auto producer and we paint hundreds of cars per day, and if you get water anywhere near our paint shop you'd be fired in about 0.5 seconds. AFAIK (as far as I know) there are 6 different types of paint...Acrylic Enamel, Urethane, Lacquer, Water based, Oil based , and powder coat.


As for what I know, I know that the perfect temperature to spray is 70F ( for perfect paint viscosity) and our humidity is kept between 60-70%. Now this is a Very big producer so we keep it monitored by computers all day everyday. When we used conventional paint (all ours are now powder coated and we use water base for repair) but when we used conventional (urethane) the vehicles were sprayed and offline ready for any polish within 2 days...

During my painting experience on cars, I always use a 2 part BC (base coat) /CC (clear coat) system. The base coat for most PPG (very respected producer)is 15 minutes between coats, and 20-40 mins between base and clear. Typically the clear paint is dry to touch in 30 minutes and good to remove tape in about an hour... Decals on in 1 day and No color sanding or buffing for 2 days...

Now if you're experiencing long dry times ...like a couple of guys have said the paint hasn't 'gassed out'...which is based on either temp, humidity or the paint not being mixed sufficiently. Any rattle can I have ever heard of has the hardeners already in the paint...Any of the oil based paints like you get at Tractor supply that are thinned with mineral spirits or Naptha...they do take longer to dry and of course look at the evaporation rates... And the same thing affects the evaporation rate, temp, humidity and mix of thinner)...

I talked with one of our paint specialists and he said, if water helps it is because it is 'floating' away some of the oil base thus removing what is keeping the oil based paint from drying. But, he indicated it will 'cut into' shine...he also said that if the paint is properly mixed it will dry soon, if however the hardeners were not mixed at the right ratio, then it will eventually harden, but you'd better not be in a hurry...

Also make sure you're primer is made for your paint...a negative chemical reaction ...all bets are off...anything could happen...

cool thread!
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#26 RoosterLew OFFLINE  

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Posted October 15, 2012 - 09:50 PM

Thanks to this thread my 856 Wheel Horse is going to look great in time for this weekends show. We were having some slow dry problems. I finally hung the parts in my shower and turned in a gentle spray, the parts were dry in an hour!!
A few days later we painted some more parts late at night, rain was forecast for the next day. Usually I wait a few days after painting to assemble, but those parts got rained on all day and were ready for assembly that evening.

Thanks guys !! GT Talk helped me out!!

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#27 HankS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 10, 2012 - 07:11 PM

I painted some small parts with Rustoleum paint, Two weeks later, they still do not feel dry,
No paint comes off on my fingers , they just feel "tacky".
I did not paint in a temp. controlled enviroment,, could the problem be too high humidity?


I know this is an older post. I've painted a lot of brackets and suspension parts on my 70 Chevelle SS. I won't ever buy rustoleum paint again. The items I did paint with rustoleum took forever to dry. Even once thoroughly dry, like a month later, you could scrape the paint off with your finger nail. Parts I painted with Krylon paint dried quickly and have a much harder surface. I had bad luck with rustoleum in the past but it was the only black paint I had with the correct level of gloss at the time. Next time I'll drive into town and buy Krylon in the color and gloss I need.
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#28 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted December 13, 2012 - 05:48 PM

Rattle cans, every body has there own way of painting with them and from years of using them I have come to the conclusion that everyone gets in a hurry, even myself at times.
Prep the part and wait a day or so, then apply your top coat or coats and allow them to set for a least a day and a half. I'm sure there is something else you could be doing while you are waiting for the paint to set up.
Now another Rembrandt is born.

Dick




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