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Neat Impliment


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#1 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 08:56 AM

Sure would like one of these to put behind the 1886.



Problem is, they AIN'T cheap
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#2 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 09:00 AM

I have seen those before, they certainly are a cool little implement! They are one of those things that you could probably save a lot of money if you made one yourself.

#3 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 09:00 AM

I really have to sit down and make one of those.

#4 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 09:05 AM

That is a neat toy! Hey, Santa! Bring me one of those!

#5 pharmer OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 09:22 AM

How much is something like that? Compare that to a FEL. Same hydraulic operation.

#6 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 10:28 AM

He's asking $975.00 for one of those rascals.

http://www.xtrememot... Parts List.htm

You can find it on that page. Click on "3 point equipment, trailers" to get to where it's listed.

He has a lot of other 'goodies' there as well. Mostly Cub Cadet, but a lot of 'generic' stuff as well.

#7 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 11:33 AM

That is a neat piece of equipment.
That soil looked very sandy, but the tires really didn't spin like it was sand.

#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 02:08 PM

That's a pretty nice rig. I wonder how well it would work on compacted soil. I'm guessing it's designed to be used to move loose material from high spots to low areas.

#9 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 02:18 PM

Building your own, one could get fancy & put a tiller just ahead of the scoop. An FEL is way more fun though.
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#10 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 05:06 PM

They are excellent and efficient tools for moving dirt from one spot to another. We purchased a full size? one that matched well with a full size Massey 165. I'd guess it held at least a cubic yard. First, we used it to build a dam on a nearby river, after receiving permission from local government. The first step was digging a "keyway" trench across the river valley, then filling it with good clay soil from the nearby area. Then we started building up the base of the dam while the river ran through some old deisel drums with the ends cut out. I think I'm remembering correctly that the final dimensions of the dam were 100 foot wide at the base, close to 30 feet high and around 1000 feet across total. We also used that "dam scoop" to cut the emergency spillway, then used a heavily modified back blade to level and smooth the overflow. This project ran 6 days per week, used a minimum of 2 drivers, each working a 6 hour shift, for a number of months. The finished lake is still full and visible from above, as seen in this screen shot from Google Earth. I think it was built around 1985.
Dam at Kalwa.jpg

Now, the reason we went to all this trouble was to end our dependence on diesel fueled generators. There was no way we could get connected to the national power grid, so all our power came from generators. For a number of years we had electricity from 6 am til noon, then no power till 5 pm, then off again around 10 pm. Diesel had to be transported from town, a good half hour away, in diesel drums, then stored in the generator house till needed. Worked well until the gas stations didn't have diesel (happened often) or had no electricity (I showed Dad how we could hook up our gas powered arcwelder/generator to the building power supply). So, with two small rivers bordering our southern property line, Dad wanted to install a hydro supply. He worked out that we could bring both rivers together to a central holding place (Fish Pond) and have enough water with enough fall to generate about 20Kw of electricity. Due to seasonal variance in the water supply, there were periods when we reduced water use so as not to run out our supply, so we only had about 10 kw on tap, but when you consider that our "big" generator was 10Kw, and ran only part time, you can see how we felt VERY fortunate. Anyway, the dam was needed to both create a reservoir for the dry season, and to raise the water about 6 feet so it could fill a supply ditch 3 feet wide that ran from the dam site down to the holding pond. The distance from the holding pond to the hydro itself was about 1200 feet. Dad calculated that the size pipe for that distance to avoid excessive water loss was too large to be economical. So, starting at the holding pond, Dad used the "dam scoop" to build a level ramp, which was then dug out to carry water in a concrete lined channel, to a point that was about 300 feet from the hydro site, but about 50 feet above that location. That allowed him to use much smaller, cheaper pipe for the final run down to the hydro.
Hydro Ramp.jpg
So, effective earthmover, uncomplicated, used the tractor we had on hand and didn't need to buy complicated earthmoving equipment. If you need to build a dam or a ramp, fill low spots or carve away high spots, I'd highly recommend this attachment.
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#11 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 05:13 PM

I see I did forget one point. Our scoop had no hydraulics to dump it. The scoop pivoted close to it's center, but was balanced such that when empty it would pivot back to the "scoop" position, and when full would pivot slightly forward, then you lowered the tractor arms slightly so the blade caught and would pivot open,catch, and spill it's load as you drove forward. The full size scoop cut well in all soil conditions that we encountered, and as we gained experience in its operation, it would do a good job of smoothing out it's load.

#12 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2012 - 06:40 PM

An FEL is way more fun though.


Not to mention more useful. While I can see a real full size unit being useful, I don't see much advantage
of this type unit over a back blade at 1/3 the cost with only a GT pulling it.

#13 goodnews OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2012 - 02:08 PM

Howard thanks for the history ,quite impressed is this set in nc if so i would to come by and see it sometime . thanks in Christ

#14 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2012 - 08:27 PM

Howard thanks for the history ,quite impressed is this set in nc if so i would to come by and see it sometime . thanks in Christ

It is on the African continent, rather close to the monument which marks the death of David Livingstone.

#15 goodnews OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2012 - 08:58 PM

It is on the African continent, rather close to the monument which marks the death of David Livingstone.

wow even more interesting would like to hear more . thanks




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