Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

1945 Lindeman Restoration


  • Please log in to reply
62 replies to this topic

#46 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,455 Thanks
  • 39,686 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted September 06, 2012 - 04:27 PM

That sounds like a good move on the clutches, Ray. I just hope they are up to the task.
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#47 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

Ryan313

    PK Fanatic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 7087
  • 3,239 Thanks
  • 5,159 posts
  • Location: Wallkill, NY

Posted September 06, 2012 - 04:50 PM

That is a good save on the group of clutches! Just make sure that they are of the same quality. I would hate to see you buy them and have them wear out to fast. Then have to buy the expensive ones anyway.
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#48 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

jdcrawler

    tinkerer

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1639
  • 3,173 Thanks
  • 1,724 posts
  • Location: Madison, Indiana

Posted September 06, 2012 - 09:38 PM

The price I'm paying is actually the fair price for what steering clutches sell for.
You can buy steering clutch pads for the MC, 40C, 420C, 430C and 440C for about $22.00 each.
The only reason the Lindeman pads are so much more is because they are a totally different design from the rest of the JD clutches and there is only one guy that makes them for the Lindeman.
It's the same with any of the other parts that are being re-produced for the Lindeman.
Each part is much more expensive for the Lindeman than the same part that is made for the other crawlers.

The company I'm buying the clutch friction pads from makes clutch and brake pads for industrial equipment manufactures and for custom applications.
They have a company here in Pennsylvania and a company in Great Britten.
The guy I talked with said the material for my clutches is the same material that they use to make clutch disc for Caterpillar so it certainly should work in my little crawler.
It comes in big sheets and is cut out by a computer controlled machine so it's easy for them to cut any size needed.
Most clutches and brakes are bonded these days so it cost more if they drill and counter-bore the mounting holes.
That's why I'm going to do the mounting holes myself.

Edited by jdcrawler, September 06, 2012 - 09:45 PM.


#49 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,455 Thanks
  • 39,686 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted September 06, 2012 - 10:15 PM

Sounds good, Ray! I think you've done the homework on them and they should work just fine.
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#50 mjodrey OFFLINE  

mjodrey

    Accumulator

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 92
  • 2,343 Thanks
  • 13,481 posts
  • Location: Upper Granville, Nova Scotia, Canada

Posted September 07, 2012 - 04:48 AM

Smart move there Ray,doing the mounting holes yourself.
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#51 twostep OFFLINE  

twostep

    Rockstar

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10198
  • 1,850 Thanks
  • 2,476 posts
  • Location: Berea, KY

Posted September 07, 2012 - 07:39 AM

That's more like what I expected... Good that you found the other supplier!

Please excuse my ignorance but I have never been around one of these... Tell me if this is correct: The tractor uses it's factory gears and clutch for main drive, then then the "steering clutches" are what you use to control each track? If that is correct. How are the controls? you let the main drive clutch out and the crawler goes, ie: in their natural position are both of the steering clutches engaged and you use the controls to "slip" the steering clutches???
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#52 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

jdcrawler

    tinkerer

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1639
  • 3,173 Thanks
  • 1,724 posts
  • Location: Madison, Indiana

Posted September 07, 2012 - 08:28 AM

Tell me if this is correct: The tractor uses it's factory gears and clutch for main drive, then then the "steering clutches" are what you use to control each track? If that is correct. How are the controls? you let the main drive clutch out and the crawler goes, ie: in their natural position are both of the steering clutches engaged and you use the controls to "slip" the steering clutches???

That is correct ... the drive clutch on the JD engine engages the transmission.
The steering clutches are engaged all the time until you disengage one side to turn the crawler.

The steering clutch pack has 5 clutch plates with a metal drive plate sandwiched in-between each clutch plate.
Each clutch plate has a friction pad fastened on each side ( 20 friction pads total ).
This clutch pack is inside a metal drum that has a brake band on the outside of the drum.

When the steering lever is pulled back, it opens up the clutch pack so they lose the grip on the drive plates.
Pulling the lever back a little farther tightens the brake band on the outside of the drum and stops the track from moving.
The track on the other side continues to turn to pull the crawler around.
The crawler will spin right around the center of the track and it leaves a drag pattern on the ground that looks like a big target.

Here is an exploded view of all the parts that Lindeman made that are mounted onto the John Deere tractor power unit to build the crawler.

Posted Image

Edited by jdcrawler, September 07, 2012 - 08:38 AM.

  • mjodrey, KennyP and twostep have said thanks

#53 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,455 Thanks
  • 39,686 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted September 07, 2012 - 08:33 AM

Thanks for the eexplanation, Ray. I knew how they turned, but didn't know the 'inside' story. So you are going to need 40 total plates. Dang, that's a bunch!
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#54 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

jdcrawler

    tinkerer

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1639
  • 3,173 Thanks
  • 1,724 posts
  • Location: Madison, Indiana

Posted September 07, 2012 - 11:11 AM

Thanks for the eexplanation, Ray. I knew how they turned, but didn't know the 'inside' story. So you are going to need 40 total plates. Dang, that's a bunch!

Just 20 clutch friction pads. There are only 5 clutch plates on each side and each clutch plate takes 2 friction pads.

#55 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,455 Thanks
  • 39,686 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted September 07, 2012 - 12:30 PM

Okay, so my math sucks. And that's a whole lot less $.
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#56 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

jdcrawler

    tinkerer

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1639
  • 3,173 Thanks
  • 1,724 posts
  • Location: Madison, Indiana

Posted September 07, 2012 - 03:51 PM

Okay, so my math sucks. And that's a whole lot less $.

No problem ,, figuring out the number of clutch plates and drive plates on each side and what takes friction pads and what doesn't take friction pads can get confusing.

You are defiantly right about one thing though .. it is a lot less money if I do all the work and just pay for the materials.
  • KennyP said thank you

#57 Amigatec OFFLINE  

Amigatec

    Collector of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5899
  • 2,023 Thanks
  • 3,172 posts
  • Location: Haskell Oklahoma

Posted September 07, 2012 - 04:58 PM

Having the steering clutches and brakes operated by the lever was not common in 1945. Cat didn't start dong that the 1970's I believe. I know the D9G they were separate, and the next model the D9H they were both on the lever, but the H still had pedals for the brakes.

The G model was made in the 1960's and the H didn't come until 1974 I believe.

Does the Linderman have a Differential or is the ring gear locked to the shaft?
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#58 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

jdcrawler

    tinkerer

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1639
  • 3,173 Thanks
  • 1,724 posts
  • Location: Madison, Indiana

Posted September 07, 2012 - 06:28 PM

Having the steering clutches and brakes operated by the lever was not common in 1945. Cat didn't start dong that the 1970's I believe. I know the D9G they were separate, and the next model the D9H they were both on the lever, but the H still had pedals for the brakes.

The G model was made in the 1960's and the H didn't come until 1974 I believe.

Does the Linderman have a Differential or is the ring gear locked to the shaft?

That's interesting information to know about the steering clutch and brake on other crawlers.
the Lindeman crawlers were made from 1936 thru 1947 and they all had this same steering system.

They do not have a differential. There is a solid shaft with the ring in the center and a steering clutch pack on each end.

Edited by jdcrawler, September 07, 2012 - 06:29 PM.

  • Amigatec said thank you

#59 Amigatec OFFLINE  

Amigatec

    Collector of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5899
  • 2,023 Thanks
  • 3,172 posts
  • Location: Haskell Oklahoma

Posted September 07, 2012 - 06:35 PM

The crawler setup I always liked we're the International with the 2 speed steering. You pull them easy for low, and pull them back all the way and lock 'em for high. If you're cutting on a slope it's great.
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#60 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

jdcrawler

    tinkerer

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1639
  • 3,173 Thanks
  • 1,724 posts
  • Location: Madison, Indiana

Posted September 12, 2012 - 02:49 PM

This crawler has a mag ignition so there isn't any electrical current draw when it is running and the ammeter doesn't read any charge unless the battery is low or I turn on the headlights.
I decided to remove the ammeter and put in a volt meter instead.

Posted Image


This reads the battery voltage when the key is on and I hooked up the gauge light to work with the headlights.
You can also see a light shining on the bench to the left of the battery box.

Posted Image


The light shining on the bench is from this light mounted on the side to illuminate the oil and water gauges on the crawler.

Posted Image
  • KennyP said thank you




Top