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#1 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2010 - 06:09 PM

Hey guys,You'll never guess what's coming into the shop next week.It's a 1924? (I can't remember what year the guy said ) Ford Model T Snowmobile.It needs quite a bit of sheet metal work.This particular Ford used to belong to my Uncle 40 years ago.
For those of you not familiar with a Ford Model T Snowmobile,here is a picture.This is just a picture I found on line,not the actual one.
Posted Image

Edited by mjodrey, July 23, 2010 - 05:19 AM.


#2 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2010 - 06:46 PM

Take lots and lots of pics! :wewantpics:

#3 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2010 - 06:57 PM

I will do that.

#4 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2010 - 08:28 PM

Wow! Seen many pictures of those. You are very fortunate to see one in person, not to mention the fact of getting to work on one!!!

#5 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2010 - 10:12 PM

Those are great!! There are a couple of 'em around here, They are a hit at the antique snow machine shows. Great you get to work on one.
Peter

#6 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2010 - 04:32 AM

There are Ford Model T Snowmobile meets in down in ......I believe the New Hampshire area every year.There are a few videos on Youtube of the meets,here is just one.I know this isn't the proper place for a video,but I put it in this thread so y'all could see these in action.

Edited by mjodrey, July 23, 2010 - 04:52 AM.


#7 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2010 - 06:23 AM

Thanks for posting the video, Maynard. What a blast! Those people are having some real fun. Even the dog was enjoying it!

#8 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2010 - 06:28 AM

Yup, there is usually a get together here in NH every year. Some are restored to WOW and some are just as they came out of the old barn....
Great video, I didn't get to that one!!
Peter

#9 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2010 - 06:56 AM

Well. I watched that movie in the hopes of seeing some real action. I found the plot to be rather thin, the acting extremely poor and there were major issues with sound quality. The continuity left a lot to be desired as well but the cinematography was reasonable. All the same, I don't envision this flick getting two thumbs up from Ebert and whoever nor will it likely get any Oscar nominations. It kind ran too long and for that reason, I wasn't all that anxious to view the 17 sequels. Perhaps if Clint Eastwood had directed, all of that would have changed.

#10 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2010 - 07:03 AM

Or maybe if Clint Eastwood had been driving one of them.:bigrofl:
I know it WAS kinda long.

#11 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2010 - 10:39 PM

I don't know if Clint would be a good addition to this "T" gathering. Most of his movies, that I've seen, the vehicles end up getting shot at, crashed, or blown up!!!!

#12 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2010 - 05:17 AM

I don't know if Clint would be a good addition to this "T" gathering. Most of his movies, that I've seen, the vehicles end up getting shot at, crashed, or blown up!!!!


And the problem with that would be........what exactly????:laughingteeth::laughingteeth::laughingteeth::laughingteeth::laughingteeth::laughingteeth:

First, I'm going to thank Maynard for providing the link. No matter what, it was nice to see that there are so many of these conversions still around and being used. All the same, I think that there was an opportunity here for this club or the organizers of this get-together to show what those half-tracks with ski's are truly capable of. About all we see is a montage of short clips spliced together of various vehicles scooting around on a light skiff of snow. No attempt was made to film any one vehicle close up and interview the driver/owner to get some details about the year of it and whether he found it as a converted unit or put the conversion on an existing T.

They could have held "Top Eliminator" drag races over a 1/8 or 1/16 mile snow strip, just for the fun of it. They could have pushed some snow into mounds and made a "Snow Cross course" to show how well these units could climb grades and negotiate a pre-determined track. The point is this. For all that video conveyed, anyone viewing it might as well have been sitting inside their own late model car and watching the event through their windshield. Other than repetative visual information, nothing else was provided to increase the viewer's knowledge of these vehicles or hold their interest.

This is an example of a nostalgic capture of an event for those who participated in it but for the non-participant, it gets "old" long before it reaches "The End". For me, that's kinda unfortunate because with a bit of imagination, so much more could have been done.

#13 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2010 - 06:23 AM

A brief history of
The Model T Ford Snowmobile
The Snowmobile Company, Inc. – West Ossipee, NH
(Story Source Credited to Model T Ford Snowmobile Club)


In 1917 Virgil D. White received a patent for an attachment designed to convert a Model T into a 'Snowmobile,' a name coined and copyrighted by White. White, a Ford dealer in Ossipee, New Hampshire, built his first snowmobile attachment 1913.
He put it on the market during the winter of 1922 after 'perfecting it in every detail,' selling the attachments exclusively through Ford dealers. The Snowmobile attachment consisted of the complete package necessary to convert a Ford into a reliable snow machine. Skis made of metal and wood and rear mounted tracks were the most noticeable differences.
The standard passenger car rear axle and driveshaft, rear spring, and radius rods were removed and replaced with a 7 to 1 Ford truck worm gear drive line attached to the frame by a pair of cantilevered semi-elliptical springs. Special heavy-duty wheels to fit the TT rear axle were provided along with anti-skip chains.
The earliest units sold by White included tracks made of metal cleats joined by a heavy fabric. White later switched to all metal tracks consisting of stamped steel shoes connected by chain links. Additions to the Snowmobile attachment in later years included a special box attached to the left frame for the battery displaced by the idler axle. A cast iron step sporting the Snowmobile insignia took the place of running boards, which were removed to allow room for the track system.
The “Ford on Snowshoes," was offered in three different gauges.
For those living where automobiles were standard 56 inch gauge was recommended. A narrower 44-inch gauge allowed driving the Ford in the tracks of horse-drawn bobsleds. Thirty-eight inch gauge was offered for Ford owners where narrower sleigh tracks were standard, such as in parts of Canada. A special slip-on body of hard maple with four coats of paint was included as part of the narrow gauge packages.
The Snowmobile became an indispensable convenience for the person requiring rapid, dependable transport in all kinds of weather. Country doctors and rural mail carriers were the largest users of this type of vehicle. Other customers of the manufactured Snowmobile included public utility companies, lumber companies, traveling salesmen, fire departments, school bus and taxi drivers, undertakers, grocers, milkmen, truckers and cranberry growers. When the father of President Calvin Coolidge died on March 18, 1926, a Model T Snowmobile led the Coolidge funeral procession over the snow-covered hills of Vermont.
Makers of the attachment claimed the ability to travel over two and a half feet of unbroken snow at an average speed of 18 miles per hour. Those who had a Snowmobile certainly used it with great satisfaction. The conversion kits were quite expensive. The attachment in 44 inch or 38 inch gauge for mounting on a roadster, or the 56 inch gauge for all body styles prior to 1926, listed at $395.00 F.O.B., West Ossipee, New Hampshire. A 56-inch gauge attachment for the one ton truck was less expensive at $250.00 because no special driveline and suspension were needed. Heavy duty 30 x 30-1/2-inch - wheels were still provided to mount on the rear axle, however.
With skis removed and front wheels installed; the Snowmobile became a Sandmobile, useful for transport through deep mud and heavy sand. A number of units sold as Sandmobiles were used in South Africa, Algeria, Egypt, and the Florida Everglades.
In 1923, White produced only about 70 units. By 1925, manufacturing rights to produce snow automobile attachments were sold to Farm Specialty Manufacturing Company of New Holstein, Wisconsin, which began to market its version of the product in 1926.

Farm Specialty Manufacturing Company later bought the patents of the Snowmobile Company and sent its managers to run the factory in West Ossipee. From 1924 to 1929, the Snowmobile Company manufactured about 3,300 units per year in its plant at West Ossipee and had a branch warehouse at St. Paul, Minnesota. The Snowmobile Company closed in 1929, and the factory mysteriously burned down shortly thereafter.

#14 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2010 - 01:55 PM

Thanks for posting the history on that, Maynard... very interesting!

#15 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2010 - 02:04 PM

Hey,I just figured maybe not everybody knows what a Ford Model T Snowmobile is.




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