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#1 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 18, 2012 - 05:43 PM

Last night I was watching Overhaulin' on tv. They showed a trick where they got the body and prime coat block sanded as smooth as humanly possible. Then they reprimed and followed the prime coat with a light coat of a darker gray primer. Then they block sanded again. The low areas showed up as darker. They continued to block sand until the dark areas went away. This way, when you have that wet like water paint job, there will be no ripples.

I bet someone on here has done this and can add their wisdom. What is the darker grey primer and where do you get it?
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#2 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted August 18, 2012 - 07:32 PM

I've heard of doing that before but have never gotten that fussy with a GT. You can usually get different colour primer from most manufacturers. I know dupli color has light and dark grey in the spray cans for instance.
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#3 Team_Green OFFLINE  

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Posted August 18, 2012 - 07:54 PM

Lilys Dad just ask your paint supplier for two different colour primers. That "trick" works great but for a GT i might do it on the hood but that is it. It will show you how much you have missed while thinking your ready for paint.

#4 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted August 18, 2012 - 09:48 PM

Kinda funny, It may be the part of the country I am in. I havent primed any of my rattle can jobs and they are going strong at 3 + years. They are shed / shop kept, and show no fade, chipping, or wear other than scuff marks on the fenders from mounting and dis-mounting. Seriously thinking of washing, detailing, and waxing all three to be displayed at the Sept Founder day's event.

#5 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 19, 2012 - 05:03 AM

Yes,that is quite common to "dust" on a darker shade and then block sand. It nicely show up any low areas or imperfections.I have done it on some of the cars I have painted.

#6 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 19, 2012 - 06:07 AM

LD,

That process is called running a " Guide Coat " in the primer stage . Most folks ( including me ) will lay down a couple coats of primer in one color , dust in another color , block it in ( wet sand ) and then re-prime any bare spots that might have gotten worked through while blocking it in.

#7 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 19, 2012 - 08:31 AM

Cool! I can still learn at my 'advanced' age. I'll have to try that on my next project. Too late now!!!

#8 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted August 19, 2012 - 10:28 AM

I love shows like that, I wish it was still in production. I've seen some pretty cool tricks on Wheeler dealers as well. Some of the things Ed does with a rattle can of paint.

#9 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 19, 2012 - 12:54 PM

It's not in production? My wife looked it up and it said they are no longer taking castings. She looked further and found that they are taking some but now they are getting really picky about who they use. They only want folks that they think are very deserving.

Anyone else have updates???

#10 ShelbyGT550 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 24, 2012 - 08:07 PM

Have not seen it aired in years

#11 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted August 30, 2012 - 10:47 PM

Well FYI the Guide coat is still made...I have been using any other color and just 'dust it' but when I can I am gettin me some. It is made by 3M here is a video I found on youtube...

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#12 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 31, 2012 - 07:48 AM

Machine dry sanding is an interesting concept. How do you do the nooks and crannies? The ridges down the center of the hood, etc.? The grille on a Wheel Horse?

#13 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted August 31, 2012 - 10:20 PM

Machine dry sanding is an interesting concept. How do you do the nooks and crannies? The ridges down the center of the hood, etc.? The grille on a Wheel Horse?

Might help?
http://www.harborfre...tool-67537.html
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#14 whst400 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 28, 2012 - 08:48 PM

If you use a squeegee to rake the sanding sludge from the surface as you're wet sanding you don't need a guide coat. The squeegee will leave sludge in the low spots.
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