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Briggs 5-s Resto.


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#1 Dane in PA OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 04:40 PM

Okay. I decided to start my restoration on my Briggs 5-S and am gathering paint, parts, and decals.

I have the engine semi-disassembled.

I hit my first roadblock... Can't get the flywheel nut off... Any ideas? Its hard to get to because of the rope starter, and has been painted over...

Thanks. I think I am going to use this thread for all of my questions and my updates as this goes on.

#2 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 04:49 PM

Can you get an impact wrench on it? I'd hit it with penetrating oil and let it sit for a few days first.

#3 Dane in PA OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 05:04 PM

I can... But how do I effectively hold the flywheel/crankshaft still? I have been using a bold in the teeth of the sprocket I have on it.

#4 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 05:08 PM

Inertia. The impact will turn faster than the flywheel can turn. Make sure which way the nut comes off.

#5 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 05:10 PM

Like said, one flywheel nuts have left hand threads. That means rights loosy, lefty tighty.

#6 bowtiebutler956 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 05:31 PM

Like said, one flywheel nuts have left hand threads. That means rights loosy, lefty tighty.

Well said Ryan! These are left hand thread! An impact wrench would work best, but if you don't have one, you can take the spark plug out, and put your pull rope down in the cylinder. This will stop the engine from turning, while you break it loose. :thumbs:

Matt
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#7 Dane in PA OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 06:31 PM

Well said Ryan! These are left hand thread! An impact wrench would work best, but if you don't have one, you can take the spark plug out, and put your pull rope down in the cylinder. This will stop the engine from turning, while you break it loose. :thumbs:

Matt


Read that in my manual... I never heard of sticking the pull rope in the cylinder... May have to try that...

#8 Ralphst16 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 07:16 PM

Bolt it down to a bench (or have someone press down on it) and put a block of wood between the bench and the flywheel fins. That will hold it from turning. Once you get the nut off, get a hammer and tap the flywheel with the peice of wood to absorb the impact and it should pop right off. Did it on my 5s last week.

#9 Dane in PA OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 07:18 PM

Bolt it down to a bench (or have someone press down on it) and put a block of wood between the bench and the flywheel fins. That will hold it from turning. Once you get the nut off, get a hammer and tap the flywheel with the peice of wood to absorb the impact and it should pop right off. Did it on my 5s last week.


My thing... High chance of breaking off fins...

#10 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 07:25 PM

I'd also worry about breaking fins. If you use the impact wrench you won't need to use the wood to hold the flywheel. I'd still give it some penetrating oil and let it work for a few days first. They can practically be welded to the shaft sometimes.

#11 Ralphst16 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 07:26 PM

Here's the manual I used: http://www.oldengine...hy/Model 5S.pdf. Check out section 27, that's how it's reccomended in the manual.
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#12 Dane in PA OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2012 - 07:57 PM

Here's the manual I used: http://www.oldengine...hy/Model 5S.pdf. Check out section 27, that's how it's reccomended in the manual.


I have my own manual website that I post manual kits on. Don't have too many yet, but still have a few good kits.


Okay, I just went out and hooked up the air compressor, tapped the trigger once and the nut came off. The flywheel wouldn't budge so I sprayed some PB on the shaft. I got my old Lawnboy's off by holding some weight on the flywheel and lightly tapping the crankshaft with a hammer... No good this time. I'll let it soak and see if it will come. Will probably order a new carb rebuild kit and a gasket for the oil pan (though the only one I can find is NOS). I will also get some primer and flat black paint.

Edited by DaneinPA, August 13, 2012 - 08:11 PM.


#13 bowtiebutler956 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 14, 2012 - 04:39 PM

I usually take a couple of small wooden wedges, and gently drive them between the mag plate, and flywheel. Then I use my brass or a plastic dead blow hammer, and smack the end of the crank. Most of the time this works very well. Just my $.02.

Matt
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#14 Dane in PA OFFLINE  

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Posted August 14, 2012 - 04:47 PM

I usually take a couple of small wooden wedges, and gently drive them between the mag plate, and flywheel. Then I use my brass or a plastic dead blow hammer, and smack the end of the crank. Most of the time this works very well. Just my $.02.

Matt


I will try this... It still didn't come off today. I blasted a few of the parts then painted them. Not many, but I will take pictures tomorrow after band camp. I polished the carb, and realized that it is just cast alum. Anybody know how the carbs were stock?

#15 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 14, 2012 - 04:56 PM

I usually take a couple of small wooden wedges, and gently drive them between the mag plate, and flywheel. Then I use my brass or a plastic dead blow hammer, and smack the end of the crank. Most of the time this works very well. Just my $.02.

Matt


Dane, if you do this, thread the nut on about halfway. This will protect the crankshaft threads. If you hit the threads they will mushroom out and you wont get the nut back on. I have a lot of time into filing threads for this reason. This goes for ANY time that you are hitting something with threads. Although, you may not have this problem with brass, or plastic. But do it anyway, it can save a lot of tedious work.




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