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Sandblasting An Engine?


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#1 Dane in PA OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 01:11 AM

I just went and bought myself a JobSmart (TSC Brand) Table-Top Sandblasting Cabinet and 50lbs of media to restore my Briggs 5-S and any other engines or projects that may come later on. I wanted to know the proper way to sandblast an engine. Would I just tear it down and sandblast the parts separated? Or take everything apart and sandblast with all of the seals taken out? Or some other way? It is a fairly nice engine, already being painted, but I want to paint it the original colors. Below is a video of the engine in question. Thanks


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#2 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 03:47 AM

Never sandblast sealing surfaces! It will Pitt them and make shafts undersized ans rough, and pockets oversized and rough, not good for oil pretension. ;)

#3 jd.rasentrac OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 04:59 AM

It may go, if you dismount the engine. But you will find the sand everywhere and so accurate cleaning of the parts is a mustbe.

Better you try to clean with a "chemical mace". Otherwise you can throw the engine away.

#4 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 05:13 AM

You didn't mention what media you're using, but I would recommend something "gentle " AND
practice on some junk first before starting the tin-worm AND
Clean, Clean, Clean it when you're done

#5 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 06:43 AM

Complete tear down. Remove all bearings, scrape off all gaskets. Use die-grinder with small scotch brite pads to clean all gasket surfaces. Blast the individual parts. Use a die grinder with "KNOT" brush about 1-1/4" diameter to clean the block outsides. Don't blast the block, piston, crank, or rod parts. Blasting has tendency to get very fine sand in the tightest places and not come out even with air blasting cleaning. If engine is running fine, just pull off tin to blast/paint, leave rest together and use the knot brush or the pads in the die-grinder as noted and paint when done.

#6 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 06:48 AM

For what its worth I wouldn't recomend sandblasting an engine block under most circumstances. The shroud and anything that can be removed is OK but the sand will get in places that it shouldn't and it is nearly impossible to get it cleaned out.

#7 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 06:57 AM

if the engine doesnt need to come apart for another reason i would just take off the tins,intake and exhaust manifold,plug a rag firmly into each port and then tape off each hole and blast away as is.


How many have you done like this and what kind of success have you had?.I know a guy that turned an engine into scrap real quick like this. You might get away with it if your using soda but not sand. Blasting media will get in places you never dreamed of or thought possible. It should be all torn down and then cleaned real good when done. Personally, I don't like to sandblast engines. I agree with JDRasentrac when he says use a cleaner and clean it.

#8 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 07:36 AM

Complete tear down. Remove all bearings, scrape off all gaskets. Use die-grinder with small scotch brite pads to clean all gasket surfaces. Blast the individual parts. Use a die grinder with "KNOT" brush about 1-1/4" diameter to clean the block outsides. Don't blast the block, piston, crank, or rod parts. Blasting has tendency to get very fine sand in the tightest places and not come out even with air blasting cleaning. If engine is running fine, just pull off tin to blast/paint, leave rest together and use the knot brush or the pads in the die-grinder as noted and paint when done.


Ditto on the Grump-ster & other posters above! Thre just isn't an easy quick way to blast an engine clean due to the moving parts and seals and non-sand friendly surfaces.. Take your time and the best thing I've seen is Goof-off or Gunk engine cleaner.. The 3M/Scotch pads are great for cleaning up gasket surfaces without resorting to razor blades like the old days..

#9 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 07:41 AM

I have used glass-bead blasting to clean many engine parts. ....As already mentioned, complete and thorough cleaning must follow the blasting. .....I use either a solvent bath or high-pressure water to clean any blasting residue, followed by compressed-air drying.

I would never recommend using sand, aluminum oxide, "black-beauty", or any coarse media for engine parts.

Lower air pressure while blasting will minimize harmful effects, but cleaning will take longer. ....Holding the part farther from the nozzle, also helps prevent damage to sensitive areas.

I would never blast an engine block unless it was stripped and completely bare.

Never blast the cylinder bore unless it is going to be re-bored, and even then, care must be used. ....The only time this can be justified is to remove rust from the bore before machining.

Never blast bearings!

#10 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 11:16 AM

The last couple i did , i used an assortment of brass, steel and SS steel bushes, my die grinder, a dental pick and just some high pressure air, for the block, oil pan and head. You can get a lot of cool small wire brushes right at the walmart store. Or you can get them gun shop. I blast the tank, and other tin work. You can also use an acid product to melt away rust & grease, such as the one that comes with POR-15.

#11 Dane in PA OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2012 - 11:29 AM

So either steel wool or very carefully... I tested out the blaster today and it is very gentle with the media i chose. Would I be able to disassemble everything, and re-install the head and other parts the cover the internals, then blast without the gaskets in it? Everything should be tight so I wouldn't hit it hard around those areas... My only problem it that it is going to take forever to get all of the paint off of the fins off of the block without blasting. A hot bath would be my second choice, but I don't know of any shops that have one around here.




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