Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Adding A New Landing And Steps To The Porch


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted August 04, 2012 - 10:09 AM

The house has been looking a bit run down lately and we decided to spruce up the front a bit. We are going to stain the front porch and I have been working on a new landing and steps. We are also building some block garden walls and doing a patio from pavers.
Yesterday I started on the addition. The best time to work there is in the morning as it faces west. It got to about mid 80's with high humidity yesterday. Anyway I worked at it from 8am to 8pm with 2 breaks of 20 minutes. Heres some pics.

Got the old stairs off and disposed of- loaders are handy!
DSCF7958.jpg DSCF7968.jpg

One problem I had was that the porch floor had sagged in the middle as the block it was sitting on had settled down. The ends are on concrete posts. I jacked the middle up about 3/4" and got most of the sag out of it. Not sure you can see that in these pictures.
DSCF7976.jpg DSCF7979.jpg

Added a cleat to mount the new landing and got it attached and levelled.
DSCF7978.jpg DSCF7995.jpg

Detail of post and the stair frame setting roughly in place
DSCF7994.jpg DSCF7996.jpg

All Done for the day. Stair treads, risers on and decking tacked down. Doooh! forgot to do the bottom stair posts! That means bottom 2 treads and riser have to come off. Thanks god the treads are screwed on.
DSCF8002.jpg

That's better. Finished it this morning!
DSCF8006.jpg
  • Texas Deere and Horse and KennyP have said thanks

#2 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,459 Thanks
  • 6,629 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted August 04, 2012 - 10:57 AM

Looks like it's coming along really nice :thumbs: You never seem to be done doing projects as a home owner , Al
  • JDBrian said thank you

#3 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,523 Thanks
  • 39,745 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted August 04, 2012 - 11:55 AM

That looks much better already, Brian. You do good work!
  • JDBrian said thank you

#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted August 04, 2012 - 12:46 PM

Thanks guys. I have dabbled in just about every aspect of house construction over the years and I haven't done anything like this for at least 15 years. Those deck screws are nice but expensive. I have been pre drilling the boards as well so it is slowing me down. That's probably not necessary but it just makes the head of the screw easier to set just below the surface making a neater job. I'm using 2 cordless 18v drills, 1 to pre drill and 1 to drive the screws. This allows me to rotate the drills and keeps them cooler. Man those drills are strong and the batteries last pretty long even driving 2 1/2" deck screws. It's 33.5c 92f out there now and the sun will soon be beating on the porch. The humidity is a bit high as well so it's too hot for me out there. I've got to put a sealer coat of stain on some more boards for the front section of the porch which has seen a lot of water and the original builders put joints in the flooring right in the high traffic area which I want to avoid. I've got to make some railings up and lattice panels and a lot of other stuff. It's a fun project but also hard work when you aren't used to it.
  • KennyP said thank you

#5 jms180 OFFLINE  

jms180

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1266
  • 927 Thanks
  • 1,219 posts
  • Location: Harvest Alabama

Posted August 04, 2012 - 01:15 PM

it is looking good. It is hard work but sure looks good.
  • JDBrian said thank you

#6 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,523 Thanks
  • 39,745 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted August 04, 2012 - 01:20 PM

I love my Hitachi 18 V. Best drill I ever bought. I don't blame you on the heat, I gave up for the day!
  • JDBrian said thank you

#7 achomesteader OFFLINE  

achomesteader

    GT Fanatic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8128
  • 867 Thanks
  • 2,231 posts
  • Location: Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Posted August 04, 2012 - 04:19 PM

Looks real good Brian! I'm sure you'll be glad when everything is finished and you can relax a little.
  • JDBrian said thank you

#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted August 04, 2012 - 04:44 PM

I love my Hitachi 18 V. Best drill I ever bought. I don't blame you on the heat, I gave up for the day!


I have 2 drills an older Milwaukee and a Ridgid compact drill. The Milwaukee was given to me by a friend who had 2 newer models. I prefer the Milwaukee. It's not as strong as the Ridgid but the clutch and the chuck are better. The charger and batteries have been the weak point on the Ridgid and right now I am down to one battery again. The extended warranty on these things is needed IMO. If I was buying more battery tools I'd go with the red ones as everything I've seen or used by Milwaukee has been first rate. We don't have much Hitachi up here. They have a good reputation but don't seem to be able to hold a dealer for long for whatever reason.

Just got back from the building supply lumber yard with a load of 14ft deck boards for the porch and a few odds and ends. Man it's a hot day for us. The sun was beating on me while I was loading the trailer and the humidity is high . I was soaked by the time I got out of there. Can't imagine what those 100F + days must be like for you guys further west and south. Thank god for A/C I guess.

#9 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

IamSherwood

    Elf guardian

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2066
  • 8,379 Thanks
  • 7,696 posts
  • Location: Northern Ontario

Posted August 04, 2012 - 07:38 PM

Well done Brian, on a good project. I noticed, you did it right, and put down lots of gravel for
drainage. Something, that builders usually skimp on. Yes, that heat was too much today.
We also had 34c. It's going to look much better when you're done.

A couple of other things I noticed.
You slipped in a pic of yourself, so now we know who we're talking to. Thanks.
And the other thing
I noticed, is that web cam, hanging from the underside of the porch ceiling.
It looks like it's pointed right into your living room. Hmmm, interesting.
  • JDBrian said thank you

#10 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted August 04, 2012 - 07:56 PM

Will the "Webcam" is actually a security light. Pressure treated wood is not the best stuff to work with and trying to pick decent lumber from the pile is a real trial. Today I cut one post in half to make the 2 bottom posts for the stair rails. The post had been laying in my trailer under the sunroom out of the weather for 2 weeks. When I sliced it in half the centre was wet in about a 2" diameter circle. The post baked in the sun for a couple of hours and I looked at the freshly cut top again. The top was dry but had small cracks in about 6 places. I guess drying that fast was not good for the wood. I think the way they do the pressure treating is to force a solution into the wood that is mostly water. That explains why some of the wood seems to be quite literally water logged. I would love to use cedar for something like this but the cost is just too high. I will take the day off tomorrow and it's supposed to rain Monday so I'll probably put a first coat on some more decking and start building the railings in the garage. With all these house projects going on there isn't much time for GT work :mecry: :mecry:

#11 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

IamSherwood

    Elf guardian

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2066
  • 8,379 Thanks
  • 7,696 posts
  • Location: Northern Ontario

Posted August 04, 2012 - 08:12 PM

Oh, ok. Security lights sometimes look like webcams. Good to hear.

Over the years, I've noticed a huge difference in the quality of PT wood. Also, it varies geographicly.
We use to have a place in Fla. That was real PT wood you got down there. Hard as a rock, and lasted.
The stuff we get here in Ont. is a joke compared to that. There has been times, that it is so green still, that
you actually get splashed in the face, when you drive that 3 1/2" spike home. And then days later it cracks
and splits.

Keep up the good work on that entry.
  • JDBrian said thank you

#12 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

KC9KAS
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10038
  • 4,783 Thanks
  • 4,303 posts
  • Location: Holland, IN

Posted August 04, 2012 - 10:30 PM

Good job on the porch repair.

#13 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

Texas Deere and Horse

    RED Wild Hogs, Horses & Deeres

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1435
  • 14,464 Thanks
  • 15,392 posts
  • Location: East of San Antonio Texas

Posted August 05, 2012 - 01:20 PM

JD., you did a very nice job replacing the steps to the porch. I have all but given up on PT wood in my projects. It is worth the extra costs to go ahead and buy Cedar, it will out last anything else you can buy, except Redwood which is still my favorite.

Very nice job !! :thumbs:
  • JDBrian said thank you

#14 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted August 05, 2012 - 04:33 PM

JD., you did a very nice job replacing the steps to the porch. I have all but given up on PT wood in my projects. It is worth the extra costs to go ahead and buy Cedar, it will out last anything else you can buy, except Redwood which is still my favorite.

Very nice job !! :thumbs:


I found that the older PT wood lasted very well, better in fact then cedar when buried in the ground for instance. Who knows with the new stuff. Cedar is just beautiful wood to work with, the smell of the dust, the colour of the wood, it's just a way nicer product. It's also hard to get good cedar here as the best stuff comes from out west. The local Home Depot has the best selection by far in this area.
Things seem to be changing a lot in the building supplies industry. Nails for instance. I bought some 3 1/2" spiral galv. nails. Made in China of course. I hadn't bought any for a long time. Those things are soft. With my weapon of choice, a 20 oz Estwing they were easy to bend and when you hit a knot, forget about it. They just aren't of the same quality as what we used to get 10yrs ago. It makes me wonder if new construction is going to last like it should. They say nothing is what it was years ago, that goes for a lot more than GT's.

#15 caseguy OFFLINE  

caseguy

    Connoisseur of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 906
  • 1,624 Thanks
  • 5,600 posts
  • Location: Edinburg, PA

Posted August 05, 2012 - 05:55 PM

That new set of steps with the landing are looking great Brian! I envy all of you who are able to work with wood and make such beautiful things from it! I just don't get along with lumber for the most part.

...There has been times, that it is so green still, that you actually get splashed in the face, when you drive that 3 1/2" spike home. And then days later it cracks and splits.


That has been my experience as well! Even when you're at the store trying to pick out 10 straight ones from the pallet. They're so wet that they weigh 40 Lbs. each! You almost have to let it sit a few days to dry before you can cut it without ruining your saw!

...They say nothing is what it was years ago, that goes for a lot more than GT's.


AMEN Brother! But the new stuff is supposed to be better for the environment...as long as YOU aren't included in that description of the "environment"!




Top