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When Does A Tractor Become An Antique?


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Poll: When Does A Tractor Become An Antique? (33 member(s) have cast votes)

When does a tractor become an antique?

  1. 25 years old (1987) (3 votes [9.09%])

    Percentage of vote: 9.09%

  2. 30 years old (1982) (7 votes [21.21%])

    Percentage of vote: 21.21%

  3. Voted 40 years old (1972) (15 votes [45.45%])

    Percentage of vote: 45.45%

  4. 50 years old (1962) (7 votes [21.21%])

    Percentage of vote: 21.21%

  5. 60 years old (1952) (1 votes [3.03%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.03%

  6. 75 years old (1937) (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

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#16 jd.rasentrac OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 11:07 AM

German law says, that a vehicle is an oldtimer when it´s 30 years or older :itsok: . If it´s 20 up to 30 year, then it´s called youngtimer. Antique is hard to define. Everyone has his own opinion what antique means.

When I see the poll right now, I´m definitely antique :ok:. Good that my wife can´t read this :bounce:

#17 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 11:14 AM

I'm sure it does vary. While researching compact tractors and particularly Grey Market machines.
I remember reading that Japan attatches an extra tax to tractors over 7 yrs old to promote the purchase of new machines. Which is why there are a lot of low hour japaneze tractors here.
If the US did that we would all be in trouble.

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 02, 2012 - 11:16 AM.


#18 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 11:17 AM

Not sure myself of what the age limits should be but there were several riding GT manufactures in the 50s and many of them were instrumental in the design of tractors made from 1960 to today. I went to Tractordata.com and found only three manufactures listed that built riders in the 50s. They were Mayrath, Panzer, and Simplicity but I do believe there were more.

Perhaps a poll is in order and since this is the worldwide premier GT site maybe this group should be the ones to make the designation of what the cutoff should be for the antique, classic and modern classes. Someone has to do so why not us.

Then there would also need to be a standard definition of what a GT is, what a LT is and what a "farm" tractor is. Some John Deere folks I know call the JD L the first garden tractor since production started in 1937.

Edited by GTTinkerer, August 02, 2012 - 11:28 AM.


#19 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 11:40 AM

I wouldn't consider. A JD model L a garden tractor. There were other Garden tractor that were being made then.

#20 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 11:41 AM

I'd say Gibson goes way back, and I know Shaw made some real oldies.

#21 cookiemonster OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 11:44 AM

I think that the problem with classifying anything like this is that age is not the only thing going on. Quality has something to do with it too. In the case of GTs there was a big difference in quality from stuff made in the 40's to anything made in the 70's. But when you get to the point where quality for a certain product has peaked and levelled off, then the newest classics and antiques that qualify each year become nothing but more of the same.

For example, at a 30 year rate, a 1982 Aries K car just became an antique. Seems wrong, doesn't it?

#22 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 12:01 PM

I went to Tractordata.com and found only three manufactures listed that built riders in the 50s. They were Mayrath, Panzer, and Simplicity but I do believe there were more.


No Speedex? how could they forget speedex LOL

Interesting concept, but IMHO the term Antique is a moniker, applied by people with varying criteria. Typically the term infers value so those applying this moniker are looking out for their interests ($). When people apply this term you need to think what is in it for them. Most guys I know that have old equipment don't refer to them that way, even once restored. We take great pride in our restorations.

Is an old beatup misused rusted with no working components and no paint, only rusted through metal which would need all the sheetmetal replaced as well as tires engine, clutches axles etc replaced tractor 'still be an antique' based on age....yes. So to me the term is self serving...

Edited by NutCASE, August 02, 2012 - 12:07 PM.


#23 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 12:14 PM

They forgot Economy also! I think there were many tractors in the 50's that were not listed there. I think the 50's was when they developed the most. And it was the decade with the most growth. IMO

I would not say an L is a garden tractor either. I think it falls into the small farm category with farmall cubs and such.

I voted for the 50 years and older would be antique.

Like Dean said, maybe we should be classifying them by when they were made and not the age of them. If that is the case I am going to say that anything made in 1959 and earlier is and antique and anything from 1960-1979 would definitely be a classic. Or maybe the classic would be more like 1960-1989? What do you guys think?

#24 Wheel Horse Kid OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 12:21 PM

Wow, I was surprised at how many notifications I had when I logged on! LOL!

Doc has good logic behind him. And that seems like a good starting point but I would think that would be more of a classic thing, as that is when they gained popularity. Maybe anything older then that could be an antique?

I don't know if I would say 75 years and older. I don't know of any real garden tractors from then other then walk behinds. Maybe walk behinds 75 years old could be considered antique?

It seems like everybody has a different opinion on this, so I added a poll.


I don't think that they meant 75 years and older. I think they meant 1975 and older.

#25 Wheel Horse Kid OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 12:22 PM

They forgot Economy also! I think there were many tractors in the 50's that were not listed there. I think the 50's was when they developed the most. And it was the decade with the most growth. IMO

I would not say an L is a garden tractor either. I think it falls into the small farm category with farmall cubs and such.

I voted for the 50 years and older would be antique.

Like Dean said, maybe we should be classifying them by when they were made and not the age of them. If that is the case I am going to say that anything made in 1959 and earlier is and antique and anything from 1960-1979 would definitely be a classic. Or maybe the classic would be more like 1960-1989? What do you guys think?


I think that is a pretty good system Ryan. 1959 and older = Antique 1960-1989 = Classic 1990-current = Modern

Edited by Wheel Horse Kid, August 02, 2012 - 12:33 PM.


#26 Wheel Horse Kid OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 12:24 PM

Not sure myself of what the age limits should be but there were several riding GT manufactures in the 50s and many of them were instrumental in the design of tractors made from 1960 to today. I went to Tractordata.com and found only three manufactures listed that built riders in the 50s. They were Mayrath, Panzer, and Simplicity but I do believe there were more.

Perhaps a poll is in order and since this is the worldwide premier GT site maybe this group should be the ones to make the designation of what the cutoff should be for the antique, classic and modern classes. Someone has to do so why not us.

Then there would also need to be a standard definition of what a GT is, what a LT is and what a "farm" tractor is. Some John Deere folks I know call the JD L the first garden tractor since production started in 1937.


Wheel Horse tractors were also made in the 50's.

Edited by Wheel Horse Kid, August 02, 2012 - 12:24 PM.


#27 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 12:24 PM

I don't think that they meant 75 years and older. I think they meant 1975 and older.


That makes sense! I would say that would be a little new. IMO

#28 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 12:28 PM

Wheel Horse tractors were also made in the 50's.


Bolens is another that just popped into my head. we could probably name many, many more. But no matter how many we name, I think we could probably all agree that a whole bunch more started to pop up in the 60s.

#29 Wheel Horse Kid OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 12:38 PM

Bolens is another that just popped into my head. we could probably name many, many more. But no matter how many we name, I think we could probably all agree that a whole bunch more started to pop up in the 60s.


You are right that a lot of them started up the 60's. Case, Cub Cadet, Allis Chalmers, John Deere, Minneapolis Moline were some brands of Garden Tractors that were started in the 60's.

#30 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 02, 2012 - 12:41 PM

I would place the somewhat fuzzy line in the 1970-1975 range. Several clubs and shows I checked use 1975 as a cut off as well.




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