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How Big Of A Plow Can I Use?

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#1 Tennblue59 OFFLINE  



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Posted August 01, 2012 - 07:55 PM

How big of a plow can you drag with a garden tractor?

See if I understand this right... The "size" of a plow describes how wide of a swath it turns - for example, a 10" plow would turn a 10" wide path? And usually, you turn about 1/2 the size deep max. So that 10" plow will turn up to 5" deep. Have I got that right?

I may be able to pick up a *free* older 14" single blade three point plow that is damaged - the 3 point mounting arms are messed up. Was thinking of trying to turn this into a pin hitch setup, or a wheeled (not sure what the proper name is) tow behind plow. I can do the creation, just dont want to have something that is too much for my gt! IF too big, I'll just fix it for my big tractor if I do get it.

This would be for a 16hp Deere 316K or 16hp Ford LGT165. Would be used in Tennessee - our soil is a lot of clay with loamy dirt in with it - and lots of rocks! Would be for new ground tht hasn't been worked in a long time.

I notice most of the ones I see on GTs are 8-10 inch plows. Is that because of weight, hp required, or just too big for what most people do with a GT?

#2 MH81 ONLINE  


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Posted August 01, 2012 - 07:59 PM

I think the biggest you'd want to try for reliable performance is a 12" plow. Not that the 14 couldn't be pulled in just the right conditions, but your description is not ideal for maxing the capacities of the machine.
To paraphrase: I think you'd do a lot of spinning and cursing.

#3 middleageddeere OFFLINE  



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Posted August 01, 2012 - 08:10 PM

I think it really depends on your ground type, if you have a lot of sand go with a 16", mixed-12' or 14" and if you are in hard pack clay get a 10" (can you get smaller than a 10"?) Good luck!

#4 jpackard56 OFFLINE  



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Posted August 02, 2012 - 06:08 AM

I'm new to the GT "sleeve hitch" plowing scene, but I think the 14" in the type of "new ground" you described would work better on your JD2320. I've pulled a single 14 in that type of ground here in SE Ohio with a 27hp diesel and have had occasion to "spin-n-cuss" to quote MH81. But either way good luck with the project and don't think about it too long, any plow that is FREE and local these days won't be there long. If it ends up not what you want then you will at least have a plow to swap for another that fits your needs better !




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Posted August 02, 2012 - 08:28 AM

A 14" plow is rated for tractors over 1500 lbs and most rated for 14" are over a ton. Your 316 weighs about 800 lbs and pulling a plow is all about traction. I doubt you could ballast enough to pull without excessive wheel spin
I too have a Clay/loam mix and think you would be happier with a 10" or 12" plow. My theory is it is better to go smaller and have your machine play with it as opposed to go big and struggle(or break?). Mh81' Spinnin & Cussin is a good way to put it.

That said Free, makes good trading stock. The right guy is looking for a 14" plow, I think that's what the 8N Ford was spec'd out for.

#6 olcowhand OFFLINE  


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Posted August 02, 2012 - 09:07 AM

I agree with most...12" max.

#7 Tennblue59 OFFLINE  



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Posted August 02, 2012 - 09:22 AM

Thanks all - Kinda figured it would be too big. But my only experience to date with plows and plowing is the old horse drawn one we have sitting in the yard for decoration!
I will deffinitely go with free and then can either trade or use on my bigger tractor.

#8 Littledeere OFFLINE  



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Posted August 02, 2012 - 06:48 PM

I think you will be happy with a 12. just to add some plows pull better than others or maybe it's just me
maybe one of the other guys will jump in I have a 12" Brinly 1200 that pulls a lot easier than a 12" JD MODEL 15
on my 316 K even win I use my 430 I can tell between the 2

#9 Amigatec OFFLINE  


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Posted August 02, 2012 - 07:29 PM

The 6" plow on my DB worked good this summer too. I was impressed I was plowing about 5" deep in dirt that hadn't been worked in years.

#10 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  


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Posted August 02, 2012 - 08:36 PM

I have to weigh in on this. I found 10 inches on a GT is about the most you can pull and full depth of 5-6". However, if you step up to a 12" and only set it to dig 5" it wouldn't pull all that harder than the 10" digging deeper. I set my 10" at 4-1/2" this spring and pulled it pretty easy with minimal weight on the tractor. So the real question other than ground type, is how far down do you want to dig that plow down?? Just because you have a 14" plow doesn't mean you can't let it dig to only 5" to gain pulling ease and take advantage of the width. Good luck with your decisions.