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Dug A Mess Of Potatoes This Week.


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#16 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 17, 2012 - 11:01 AM

I tried sweet potatoes a couple of years ago. Did not work good at all. That was a first and last attempt!


Not having success is a very good reason to try again. Thomas Edison when asked about his 1000 failures to create an electric light said "I have not failed, I have learned 1000 ways not to make an electric light".
He eventually got it right!

Edited by JD DANNELS, July 17, 2012 - 11:08 AM.


#17 Wheel Horse Kid OFFLINE  

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Posted July 17, 2012 - 01:22 PM

Not having success is a very good reason to try again. Thomas Edison when asked about his 1000 failures to create an electric light said "I have not failed, I have learned 1000 ways not to make an electric light".
He eventually got it right!


You are right, but I like the red potatoes a whole lot more than sweet potatoes, so I would rather use the sweet potatoe space for red potatoes.

#18 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2012 - 07:21 AM

We haven't got a lot of potatoes this year, but the zucchini have done great, the tomatoes were prolific, but she somehow got a cherry tomato seeds, and the drug dealers that got arrested up the road and abandoned their garden left one really terrific watermelon.

#19 twostep ONLINE  

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Posted August 16, 2012 - 01:41 PM

I tried sweet potatoes a couple of years ago. Did not work good at all. That was a first and last attempt!


didn't garden this year do to house sell/buy but last year I started two whole sweet potatoes (bought them at kroger) in mason jars and transplanted them to a couple of large hills. I ended up filling about a bushel for each plant. The larges potatoes were up to about a foot long and 4 or 5 inches in diameter... Man I love sweet potatoes. Baked and buttered for me please.
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#20 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted August 16, 2012 - 02:59 PM

didn't garden this year do to house sell/buy but last year I started two whole sweet potatoes (bought them at kroger) in mason jars and transplanted them to a couple of large hills. I ended up filling about a bushel for each plant. The larges potatoes were up to about a foot long and 4 or 5 inches in diameter... Man I love sweet potatoes. Baked and buttered for me please.

How did you do this? I, too, love sweet potatoes. Ever tried fried? Enlighten me please!

#21 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 16, 2012 - 03:26 PM

Kenny , they are good as cottage fries and french fried for sure. In fact now the Perkins Resturants offer French Fried Sweet Potatoes. And they can be substituted as an upgrade (price escapes me) to french fries. This year is the first I've seen that around here. I remember in grade school we took a cutting of sweet potato stck tooth picks in it so it would not be totally submerged in a mason jar full of water. they would root and grow a plant. I suspect that's what TwoStep is describing.
The cuttings from the seed house are fairly expensive. Buying sweet potatoes at the grocery and taking a generous cutting off of it and using the rest for table might be an economic way to get you plants? This might be an experiment i'll have to try next year.
Now I have to thank Two Step for giving me an idea.
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#22 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted August 16, 2012 - 03:32 PM

I would like to have some of those french fries. Sounds good! Guess I'll have to break down and buy a couple. Been a long time since I had one!

#23 twostep ONLINE  

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Posted August 16, 2012 - 11:02 PM

Kenny, JD DANNELS is right except I took two whole potatoes (not to say that cuttings wouldn't work, they would actually be much more economical) toothpicked them and put each of them in it's own quart mason jar and set them in the window sill. Once whether warmed up to above 60 at night I moved them outside and let them grow till they had 8 or 9” vines. Then I move the two plants to their beds. The hills were primo… my garden did not have good soil so I went and got 4 bags of top soil and two bags of manure, mixed it together with about 20 pounds of starbucks coffee grounds (they give it way for free). Last year was a record year for rainfall in my parts so I didn’t have to water any and it got to the point that I had to weedeat the vines out of my yard and the mounds were splitting pretty heavily. I let the vines die off and dug them up a week or so later. Funny thing is when I dug up the plants, I guess since they started as whole, the original potatoes looked as if they could have still been good eating potatoes. I’ll take pic’s of next year’s crop as I intend it to be much bigger.

Edited by twostep, August 16, 2012 - 11:02 PM.

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#24 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2012 - 04:21 AM

I'll give that a try next year! Thanks!

#25 twostep ONLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2012 - 07:28 AM

Good luck. I plan to have several plants as well as a bunch of reds and russets.

#26 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2012 - 09:18 AM

Since this thread is seeing more activity,I guess I should make a new report.
Last week I dug a 40 ft row of Kennebec and got about 2 5 gallon buckets of potato's.
The only potatoes left are the Russets, vines are still green so will be a couple weeks before I dig them.

Overall the garden is only yeilding about 1/3 of what it did last year. I can't complain as we have been in Extreme Drought this year. Since I plant more than I need to share, we still are not hurting.
The brightest spot in the garden has been the Tomatoes. they really seem to like the dry hot weather(i've found very little blossom rot). The wife planted 4 dozen roma tomatoes(this is a paste variety and very meaty) this year and is averaging 4 5 gallon buckets of Roma tomatoes per week. There has been a lot of Salsa and stewed tomatoes put up for winter.

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 17, 2012 - 09:20 AM.

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#27 twostep ONLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2012 - 03:39 PM

JD, since you mention the drought does that mean that you don't irrigate?

#28 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2012 - 04:21 PM

In a normal year it is not required in Iowa, There are a few farmers who do so in the Mississippi & Missouri river bottoms.
There was two farmers who set up equipment in this county I've not seen that equipment in use in over 20 yrs.
But gettig a state permit to irrigate is nearly impossible.
Were I to dig wells, I would be allowed to pump only 5000 gallons per day without getting a state permit to irrigate.
I'm on county water and it is too expensive to irrigate the whole garden. I did water some but not that much.

#29 Newpaws493 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 17, 2012 - 05:02 PM

Don't have a lot of space, but I managed to pull these lil goodies last month.


07-19-12_1937.jpg



I staggered my planting a week or two at a time, just from the taters that showed eyes before use around the house, so there is gonna be variety as I go. Haven't pulled any reds yet. I like surprises.

#30 jessylee OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2012 - 02:10 PM

i love the tast of fresh cut french frys well what i did this year was i had cut all my potatos from this season into frys and blached them in hot oil to preserve them then i frezed the fresh cut french frys . in big zipp lock bags and all throw the winter i can have good harty french frys i moved into an appartment and i didnt have a way to store them for long periods of time. i did have a problem with them turning green fast dose any one know what causes them to turn green. i think it was bc it was humid this fall but i dont realy know




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