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My Bolens Project - 850

bolens 850 191-02 tube frame wisconsin s8d tractor restoration 1969

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#76 MailmAn OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2012 - 08:26 AM

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Wow! I can't believe it has been this long since I've updated this thread! (Almost 2 and a half months!) A lot has happened since then (including finally finding a complete snow caster for my tractor! Yeah!) Still, I figured it was time to dust off this old relic of a thread for an update and a question...

The update on this is I'm finally on my way to having some decent looking (not excellent, but not too bad either) paint on the hood and fenders. For some reason (probably due to my incessant nit-picking of the paint on the hood and constantly trying to touch it up and fix it) right now the fender is actually looking better than the hood for the moment. I spent this past weekend painting since it was so nice out and the temperature was in the 60's Sunday and Monday. I'm hoping (before the temperature starts to drop off again, which is bad for trying to paint in) to get this thing done. But I also don't want to rush it and end up with a mediocre at best paint job.

To that end, here is the question: Is there any way to "clean up" the paint that is on the hood now without ruining it? By which I mean that if I sand it with even 400 or higher grit sandpaper, it will still "ruin" the shiny finish of the paint and I will have to respray the whole thing after I'm done sanding it down. The paint itself actually doesn't look too bad right now and I hate to have to sand it back down and start over again. However, the last coat of paint I put on the hood did some weird things for some reason. Like I said, it looks good from about 10-15 feet or so, but if you look closely, you can see (and feel) some tiny bumps on the paint surface. I'm not sure what caused it, but it almost seems like the paint layer underneath started to bubble up when the top layer of paint was drying or something. Could it have been that I put the last coat on too soon and the layer underneath wasn't dry yet, especially since it has been colder out lately? I waited at least 14-16 hours or so, although it wasn't a full 24 hours...

So, basically, I'm wondering if there is any way I can buff the paint smooth without sanding it down so that I need to re-coat it again when I'm done smoothing out the rough spots and bumps on my paint job? Does anyone have any suggestions? Like I said, I don't want to ruin my shiny paint surface with whatever method I use to try and clean up the paint. If it helps at all too, I'm using the Majic Tractor and Implement paint in the spray cans from Tractor Supply Center (TSC) as well as a top coat of Majic Clear Coat over that. I have to say that this point does go on a bit weird compared with other paints I have used (like Rust Oleum) as it sprays in large dropplets onto the surface which eventually flatten and smooth out as it starts to dry to make a nice continuous surface. The first time I used it, I thought the nozzle was plugged or something since it was spraying weird and I was worried I ruined my paint job, but after it dried it looks much better.

#77 mixedbreed96 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2012 - 11:21 AM

Another side question here: The local TSC stopped carrying the Valspar Tractor and Implement paint, so I bought some of the Majic Tractor, Truck, and Implement paint in the same IH White color to finish painting my tractor. Has anyone else had any experience with the Majic paint before? It is a bit more expensive than the Valspar was, but IDK if it is better quality than the Valspar and will resist fading more. I'm looking to buy some spray paint to finish off the tractor as it will be cheaper than trying to buy an HVLP sprayer to apply the paint they sell in quarts. I already used some of the Majic paint in quarts, so I think I should finish it off with the Majic spray paint. With this type of tractor paint, do you just leave it as it is or can you spray clear coat over the top of it? I have a couple of cans of Rust Oleum clear I could spray on, but will this make my paint job look bad or otherwise harm the paint? The only thing I can think of is that the farm paint may take a few weeks to fully cure and putting clear over the top might make it never setup fully? My thought was that the clear would help protect the finish more and keep it from scratching or fading longer. Does anyone have experience with this that could help me out? Thanks!

i tried the new paint on my bolens and did not like the quality at all!

#78 EricFromPa ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2012 - 05:57 PM

Ya that Majic paint is total CRAP.Doesn't coat at all and if you do get the junk to spray on evenly,it runs all over the place.On a good note it does look very good for a thin Top coat.It's one of the glossiest paints I've ever used.

Think that they have a wee bit to much clear and not enough pigment in they're paint.

Even after 4 thick runny coats you can see primer through it in the sun light.

Edited by EricFromPa, November 14, 2012 - 05:58 PM.

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#79 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2012 - 07:13 PM

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To that end, here is the question: Is there any way to "clean up" the paint that is on the hood now without ruining it? By which I mean that if I sand it with even 400 or higher grit sandpaper, it will still "ruin" the shiny finish of the paint and I will have to respray the whole thing after I'm done sanding it down. The paint itself actually doesn't look too bad right now and I hate to have to sand it back down and start over again. However, the last coat of paint I put on the hood did some weird things for some reason. Like I said, it looks good from about 10-15 feet or so, but if you look closely, you can see (and feel) some tiny bumps on the paint surface. I'm not sure what caused it, but it almost seems like the paint layer underneath started to bubble up when the top layer of paint was drying or something. Could it have been that I put the last coat on too soon and the layer underneath wasn't dry yet, especially since it has been colder out lately? I waited at least 14-16 hours or so, although it wasn't a full 24 hours...

So, basically, I'm wondering if there is any way I can buff the paint smooth without sanding it down so that I need to re-coat it again when I'm done smoothing out the rough spots and bumps on my paint job? Does anyone have any suggestions? Like I said, I don't want to ruin my shiny paint surface with whatever method I use to try and clean up the paint.



I hate to tell you this , but I dont think there is any way you can fix what already has been done to the paint without starting completely over again.
If you try and sand down the rough spots I think you will loose the shine. You can try it but I think its going to take Alot of sanding to get the runs/imperfections back down, especially using fine grit paper.
I think you may have applied the other coat too early before the previous coat had dried. I believe I recall you waiting for the rain to stop a few times while painting? If that was the case the humidity in the air would slow up the curing process. Also painting in this cold weather recently will cause curing to be delayed as well.
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#80 MailmAn OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2012 - 10:06 PM

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I know it has been some time since I have updated this, but I have been pretty busy lately. Between doing lawn/leaf cleanups when I can, going Christmas shopping (and not having any money left to work on my projects as a result, lol...), and tearing apart my newly purchased EK-10 (which I need to start a restoration thread for that now as well...) it has been tough finding time to finish up my 850! I feel I have been very lucky so far this winter as we have not had any snow yet in Albany and the temperatures have been really pretty mild for this time of the year. But as it is getting colder and rainier and eventually will be snowier as well, I felt I HAD to capitalize and get the 850 put back together again, even if the paint job on it wasn't as good as I felt it should be (especially for how much time, money, and energy I have into it). But, that said, now that it is together again finally, I don't think it ended up turning out all that bad in the end. Could it have been better? Definitely, yes! But is it acceptable for a working tractor that I'll use all the time? Sure. It is at least a hell of a lot better than it was when I bought it. Just for easy reference too, I might as well post a picture of what it looked like when I first brought it home in May of 2012 for $150:



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There, now you don't have to click all the way back to Page 1 of this thread to see what the tractor originally looked like before I started "restoring" it. But, before I can skip right to the finished product to show you how it ended up, I need to rewind a bit to update some progress that I think I might have skipped over earlier. Like for starters, I don't think I updated this thread when I painted some of the brown parts of the tractor when I had it apart fixing the broken shift fork in the transaxle back in September. (http://gardentractor...50-help-please/) While I was fixing the transaxle, I took the opportunity to paint some of the parts that I took off of the tractor, like the cowl, transaxle cover, shifter and cover plate, and steering column, among other things. Here are some shots of the tractor all masked off for painting the steering column, which turned into a bit more of a production than if I had tried to take it off, probably. (However, I didn't want to attempt to pull the steering wheel off in case I might end up damaging it trying to get it apart...)

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So, this is what the frame/chassis looked like after I was done painting it and re-assembling it after I fixed the transaxle:

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Not too bad I'd say. The problem I keep seeming to have though is no matter what paint I use (in this case I actually used Rust Oleum and not that crappy Majic paint from TSC to paint the brown colored parts), the paint seems to scrape off much too easily for my liking. Like take a look at the shifter ball in the photo above and see how scuffed up the paint is already after I just reinstalled it? It's not even like I used it a lot yet or anything. Oh well, I guess you can't keep everything looking perfect. Also, if you notice I replaced all the hardware with new Grade 8 bolts and nuts for the cover and stainless steel machine screws and nuts and bolts for the shifter cover and the engine cowl. Hopefully that should keep everything together and working smoothly.

The next thing I did before finishing up the hood and mounting it to the tractor was to put the missing engine shroud baffles on the Wisconsin S8D. However, I found out that the top engine baffle mounts underneath the gas tank mounts and the front engine cover and the top cover that the voltage regulator and starter solenoid mount to, among other things. So, basically it was a pain in the ass to try and mount. So, I figured that while I had to take it apart anyways to put the baffles on, that I should pull the head off and check for carbon build-up and the condition of the head gasket. Here is the tear-down process on the engine:

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Here is the front engine cover that I pulled off. It is filthy with years of grease and grime and dirt build up. I wish I had the chance to take a picture of it after I cleaned it, but it was getting dark and I was in a hurry to just throw it all back together. But I let it soak in some Simple Green solution in the stationary tub in the basement while I was working on the rest of the engine and scrubbed it down before I re-installed it. It looked like new when I put it back on the engine!


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Gotta love that big, solid cast-iron flywheel on the front of the ol' Wisconsin! Plus, you have to admit that it is a pretty large, beefy looking engine for only 8.25 HP. It looks to be roughly about the same size of a modern 12-14 HP engine. They certainly don't make engines like this anymore!


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Now, while I was also at it, I pulled out the old, decrepit, dry-rotted fuel line that was routed around the front of the engine. As I had mentioned in another thread (here: http://gardentractor...oo-darned-cold/) when the mercury started dipping down low, I noticed I had troubles with the engine starting and running properly when it was cold. I found out that part of it was the old fuel line seemed to be leaking and wasn't really supplying the fuel that the engine needed (plus, maybe some water got into the line and froze up preventing me from starting it until some carb cleaner broke it up? Who really knows...). Well, here is what the old fuel line I pulled out looked like:

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Not too good, right? I also love how the fuel line end that attached to the carburetor inlet was held on with a ZIP TIE!!! :wallbanging:


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Well, once all the "fluff" was removed from around the engine and I had clear access to the head, I pulled it off expecting to find a ton of carbon build-up inside the engine, which might be causing my worrisome knocking noise when running the engine at high RPMs. However, this is what I found:

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I mean, yes there is a little bit of carbon build-up on the piston and a bit on the valves, as one would expect from a working engine. However, nothing screamed excessive about the carbon inside the engine. The head gasket also looked to be in decent shape and I don't think was leaking or anything. It looked like I could probably have even reused it, but to be on the safe side (and since I had already purchased one from Brian a while ago...), I replaced it with a new head gasket.

After using my Dremel tool with a fine sanding wheel on it to clean off the head gasket mounting area as well as the piston and valve surfaces and the inside of the head, it looked a bit like this. Notice that the piston has "+.020" stamped into it? I'm wondering if this engine was rebuilt at some point (maybe even fairly recently?) and has an oversized piston in it than stock? Can anyone else confirm this?

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Once I finished re-assembling the engine with the new head gasket and new fuel line (which I had cut twice at the parts store because the first time they cut it it looked too short, so I had them make it longer and even with the longer piece it barely reached and was a pain to try and slip over the shut-off valve on the gas tank, but I digress...), I fired it up to make sure it still ran, which it did very well as a matter of fact. Started right up after just touching the ignition key.

My next step after getting the engine all squared away was to finish up the hood and get it ready to install on the tractor. I had decided on a slightly different than stock paint scheme for my 850 in the end, in part because I was upset with the quality of the paint job. The other part of it was I really liked the look of the shiny bare metal of the hood once I scraped all of the old paint off of it and wanted to keep it like that, except for the fact that it would have instantly rusted and looked like hell. But, I thought I'd try to capture at least some of that effect by painting the grille part of my hood chrome with some Krylon fake ghetto chrome spray paint I bought. So, once I finished painting the hood and fenders white, I masked off around the grille to protect the newly painted white surface and threw on 3-4 coats of chrome paint on the grille. I was actually really surprised at how much faster the Krylon paint dries vs. the Majic paint. The Majic paint takes overnight for one coat to cure, but the Krylon was dry to the touch in a couple of hours. I finished painting it in only 2 days including a clear coat top coat. Here is what it looked like before I took the masking off:

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Here is the finished hood before I put the vinyl decals on that I bought from Vintage Reproductions / ClickItandStickIt:


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Here is the finished hood after painstakingly applying the new reproduction decals wrong. I was kinda surprised at how difficult it was to apply the new decals to the hood. The biggest problem actually wasn't worrying about the decals sticking to the surface so that I couldn't reposition them to make final adjustments before applying them completely, but rather just the opposite. I couldn't seem to get the decals to stick fully and they kept peeling up on me, especially when trying to remove the top transparent protective layer after applying the decals. After trying to spray a light misting of slightly soapy water to the surface before applying a decal on the first attempt, only to have the decal refuse to stick at all, I scrapped that idea and just started applying the decals directly to the hood. The trickiest decal to apply was of course the Husky Man decal on the front in between the headlights. It is recessed, has complex rounded corners, and has two big cutouts for where the headlights go, so there is not much for the decal to stick to around the headlights. Of course, I also made it worse by spraying it with soapy water so the decal wouldn't stick. So, that decal got all sorts of messed up. Still, I managed to get it on there fairly well considering all the difficulty I encountered. The other decals went on fairly well by comparison, but I still had a few issues that I'll highlight in a minute. The biggest issue, as I said, was that once I had the decals perfectly positioned and pressed on, once I tried to remove the clear protective top layer to permanently affix the decals, it was pulling up the vinyl on me so I had to try to press them back down and that is where I ended up with problems.

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Now that you have a good overview of the hood overall, time to show you all of the nitpicky areas that bothered me when applying the decals. The Husky Man decal got worse when I tried to cut out the headlight holes and I tried to patch it up by applying some strategically cut out pieces of black vinyl to the worst areas, but I don't think it made it look all that much better in the end:

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A few spots of the red stripe decal got crinkled up when trying to go around the front corners of the hood:


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One part of the stripe on the left side of the hood got folded over a tad when trying to apply the decal, so I had to leave it as it was to avoid destroying the decal any further by trying to "fix it" and making a bigger mess out of it. It really isn't all that noticeable unless you look at it closely:


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The "BOLENS 850" decal on the left side fo the hood also got a bit crinkled in the corner when trying to permanently apply it and the corner of the decal lifted up when removing the top protective layer:


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But, from 50 feet, it looks pretty darned good and a heck of a lot better than it was (see the beginning of this post for reference...) The next step after applying decals was to install my not-so-factory new headlights. Yes, my 850 originally came without headlights and instead had the stupid dummy headlight lens inserts. However, especially for snow blowing, it might come in handy to shed some light on the subject (since snow doesn't know what time of day it is and frequently can snow when it is dark outside). Fortunately, I had bought some headlights, a taillight, and some wire from Brian earlier, so I got busy installing those in my freshly painted and decaled hood:

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How do you like my nice wiring work? I put crimp-on wire connectors at the ends of all my freshly cut wire lengths and wrapped them with electrical tape to keep them (more or less) waterproof and to protect them from the elements that would corrode the connections. I even used the factory wiring color scheme with the headlights.


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A close up of the headlight retainers. I thought this was kind of flimsy myself to hold in a heavy headlight, but it seems to hold alright for now:


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After wiring up the new headlights, I installed the hood onto the tractor using new Grade 8 bolts, nuts, and washers. I tested out the headlights by touching the green wire that was already included in the wiring harness (but was never attached to anything before) to the battery terminal and they work great! Now I just need to wire up a switch for the dash tower to control the lights. Here is how the hood looks on the tractor:

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Plus, an obligatory "artistic shot" of the hood:


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The next steps are to install the fender, wire up the taillight, and install a headlight switch to control the lights. Actually, I SAY that, but all that stuff has already been done as I am writing this! So much for trying to do this following any sort of timeline, lol. In honesty, I was running out of daylight to take good pictures with when finishing up the rest of the things I had mentioned above. Plus, it has been rather rainy and cold and nasty out since I have finished the tractor, so I'm kind of out of good pictures of the finished product. I do have a few other pictures left that I snapped on my cell phone in the dark just after I finished wiring up the taillight and the headlight switch. They're not the best, but they should give you an idea of what it looks like at least:

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So, I guess that's about it for now! I know, that was quite the update, but I had a lot of ground to cover in one post. At lot has happened since the last time I posted in this thread! I look forward to hearing your comments on how my 850 project turned out. At least I feel good that it is finally all back together again after only a few short... er, uh... 6 months or so I've been working on this now? Now I'm ready for the snow (once I swap the mower deck for a plow blade or snow blower that is...) and I won't have to worry about having an unprotected engine out in the elements without the hood any longer.



Let's see... now all I have left to do is work on a little EK-10 to get that in working order. Posted Image It never ends, does it? lol...

Edited by MailmAn, December 17, 2012 - 10:33 PM.

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#81 1967bolens collector OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2012 - 11:26 PM

You are correct , the pulley is cast iron but it can be repaired.
I would follow what others have said and file down the end of the shaft as there is a good chance the end has mushroomed out from someone hitting it. You probably will be better off to use a metal hand file to take some material off the end of the shaft as you will be there forever if you are using sand paper.



mine was broke in 2 an welded back together an vibrated like crazy so the doner 850 had a good one

#82 1967bolens collector OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2012 - 11:30 PM

looks great i cant wait to get paint on mine and lay new decals on it
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#83 Newpaws493 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2012 - 07:20 AM

I'd say 'much improved!' Anything that you're not completely satisfied with at this point, can be addressed in the spring, IMO.
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#84 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2012 - 07:27 AM

Looking good from Tulsa! Glad to see it all prettied up!
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#85 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2012 - 07:32 AM

That turned out pretty good .Looks alright.
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#86 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2012 - 08:08 AM

Looks Good :thumbs:
Its always a good feeling to get a tractor finally back together

The +0.20 does mean that it was re-bored at some point and fitted with an over size piston and rings. Its probably too late now but did you check the valve clearances and seating when you had it all apart? Would have probably helped to get a bit more compression with a good lapping of the valves.
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#87 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2012 - 08:22 AM

WOW ! ....It doesn't look like the same tractor I saw !

You asked: "Notice that the piston has "+.020" stamped into it? I'm wondering if this engine was rebuilt at some point (maybe even fairly recently?) and has an oversized piston in it than stock? Can anyone else confirm this?"

Yes, the engine had to have been rebuilt at some point in time, as the the factory did not ship engines which were over-bored .010" or .020".

Did you use rattle-cans, or a spray gun for the brown paint?


edit: (Brian's post did not show until after I posted this.)

Edited by Bruce Dorsi, December 18, 2012 - 08:25 AM.

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#88 MailmAn OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2012 - 09:05 AM

WOW ! ....It doesn't look like the same tractor I saw !


Thanks! :D (I'm assuming you mean that in a GOOD way? lol...)

Yes, the engine had to have been rebuilt at some point in time, as the the factory did not ship engines which were over-bored .010" or .020".


Well, that is cool then. At least I know that the engine *SHOULD* be in pretty decent shape then if it has been rebuilt and should last a long time. If it is over-bored .020", I wonder how much HP that might give me out of this engine? I'm assuming it should be more than 8.25 HP after that and maybe close to 9HP now? IDK if there is any way of finding out as you don't exactly dyno a tractor, although I might pay to see that! lol...

Did you use rattle-cans, or a spray gun for the brown paint?


Rattle-cans for the entire paint job. I don't have an air compressor or a HVLP spray gun. The white paint I used was the Majic IH White from TSC and the wheels are Majic MF Red and the brown was Rust-Oleum Dark Brown in the Industrial size large spray can from Lowe's. I think that color brown matches the OEM color better than the Rust-Oleum Brown Leather color that Tom painted the pulleys I bought from him. If you look closely at the pictures, the pulleys are a different color than the parts of the tractor that I painted brown...

Looks Good :thumbs:


Thanks! Even though it doesn't look quite as good as any of YOUR tractors...

Its probably too late now but did you check the valve clearances and seating when you had it all apart? Would have probably helped to get a bit more compression with a good lapping of the valves.


Not really. I mean, I checked the valves opening and closing as I rotated the flywheel around and they looked pretty good to me. I don't have a feeler gauge for adjusting valve clearances anyways, so I didn't want to bother messing about with it. Also, I didn't pull the carburetor or the exhaust or any of the side of the engine apart to get at where the valve springs and guides and keepers are to check or adjust them anyways. Plus, I figured if it had already been rebuilt, it *SHOULD* be within tollerances still... I know that is no guarantee that it is perfect, but I don't have any issues with it running really. It just knocks a bit at high RPMs and some of that could be the carburetor needs a good rebuild. The engine internals all looked pretty good to me. The cylinder walls looked nice and smooth and not gouged or anything. I originally thought that maybe the governor wasn't working properly, but it does look like the governor arm is moving when you give it the beans to control the engine RPM, so I'm assuming that is all okay. The only weak links could be the actual throttle cable itself and/or the governor/throttle linkages on the side of the engine not being exactly right. Not sure if any of this is actually affecting the engine operation or not though.



(EDIT: Oh, and one other little annoyance I found is there still seems to be a minor gas leak. I thought it was just leaking around the cracked and dry-rotted fuel line, which I'm sure it was. However, after replacing the fuel line, I still find it very, very slowly leaking from the shut-off valve on the gas tank. :wallbanging: IDK if it has always leaked here and I just didn't notice it or if I made it leak by messing around with the fuel line. It is not a big leak though and it obvieusly stops leaking when it is running since the carburetor is sucking though the gas. It only starts to leak when the engine is off and cold and I haven't noticed any big puddles of gas where the tractor is parked or any major loss of gas from the tank.)

Edited by MailmAn, December 18, 2012 - 09:14 AM.


#89 1967bolens collector OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2012 - 11:02 AM

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Wow! I can't believe it has been this long since I've updated this thread! (Almost 2 and a half months!) A lot has happened since then (including finally finding a complete snow caster for my tractor! Yeah!) Still, I figured it was time to dust off this old relic of a thread for an update and a question...

The update on this is I'm finally on my way to having some decent looking (not excellent, but not too bad either) paint on the hood and fenders. For some reason (probably due to my incessant nit-picking of the paint on the hood and constantly trying to touch it up and fix it) right now the fender is actually looking better than the hood for the moment. I spent this past weekend painting since it was so nice out and the temperature was in the 60's Sunday and Monday. I'm hoping (before the temperature starts to drop off again, which is bad for trying to paint in) to get this thing done. But I also don't want to rush it and end up with a mediocre at best paint job.

To that end, here is the question: Is there any way to "clean up" the paint that is on the hood now without ruining it? By which I mean that if I sand it with even 400 or higher grit sandpaper, it will still "ruin" the shiny finish of the paint and I will have to respray the whole thing after I'm done sanding it down. The paint itself actually doesn't look too bad right now and I hate to have to sand it back down and start over again. However, the last coat of paint I put on the hood did some weird things for some reason. Like I said, it looks good from about 10-15 feet or so, but if you look closely, you can see (and feel) some tiny bumps on the paint surface. I'm not sure what caused it, but it almost seems like the paint layer underneath started to bubble up when the top layer of paint was drying or something. Could it have been that I put the last coat on too soon and the layer underneath wasn't dry yet, especially since it has been colder out lately? I waited at least 14-16 hours or so, although it wasn't a full 24 hours...

So, basically, I'm wondering if there is any way I can buff the paint smooth without sanding it down so that I need to re-coat it again when I'm done smoothing out the rough spots and bumps on my paint job? Does anyone have any suggestions? Like I said, I don't want to ruin my shiny paint surface with whatever method I use to try and clean up the paint. If it helps at all too, I'm using the Majic Tractor and Implement paint in the spray cans from Tractor Supply Center (TSC) as well as a top coat of Majic Clear Coat over that. I have to say that this point does go on a bit weird compared with other paints I have used (like Rust Oleum) as it sprays in large dropplets onto the surface which eventually flatten and smooth out as it starts to dry to make a nice continuous surface. The first time I used it, I thought the nozzle was plugged or something since it was spraying weird and I was worried I ruined my paint job, but after it dried it looks much better.



when i paint my tractors in the cold i will warm the metal and paint uo for a few minutes near a heater or woodstove like i have

#90 1967bolens collector OFFLINE  

1967bolens collector

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Posted December 18, 2012 - 11:07 AM

wwhat happened cant get her to run now?





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: bolens, 850, 191-02, tube frame, wisconsin, s8d, tractor, restoration, 1969

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