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Tomato Blossom Rot?


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#1 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 08:04 AM

The wife and I used to have a large garden when the kids were growing up (free labor) but haven't had one in several years. This year we planted a few tomato and pepper plants in one of the old flower beds in front of the house. Some of the tomatoes are starting to ripen but as soon as they get close the bottom of the tomato will turn black.

An online search showed similar photos that was called blossom rot. The site said it was caused by calcium deficiency and possibly over watering. The over watering is possible since the sprinkler is being used frequently since we reseeded the front lawn and have been watering at least daily. I have adjusted the sprinkler to keep the water off the tomatoes. The cherry tomatoes are fine but the "early girls" are all coming out bad.

My stupid question is can I buy a coup[le of gallons of milk and pour it around the plants to help add calcium?

Thanks,
Bill

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  • 2012-06-21 Blossom rot.JPG

Edited by GTTinkerer, June 21, 2012 - 08:05 AM.


#2 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 08:14 AM

I think egg shells add calcium.
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#3 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 08:54 AM

Egg shells, or pick up some crushed oyster shells that you feed to chickens.
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#4 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 09:18 AM

I found this looking around. Of course lime will be too slow to help this year but the dry wall mud sounds like it would go right to work.

Liming the soil with calcium carbonate [crushed limestone.] Best in the winter or off season, or before planting.
--There are commercial sprays available [calcium nitrate & calcium chloride] that you can spray on or around the plants themselves during the growing season.

Calcium may be present in abundance and still not taken up by the plant; uptake can be supressed by a number of causes [water deficiencies or irregularities; magnesium/nitrogen/potassium excess in soil; high humidity or excessive transpiration in the plant; high acidic soil, etcetera.

Sheet rock mud works great to prevent blossom end rot. Get a large hand full of sheet rock mud and stir it into 5 gallons of water. After planting your tomatoes plants give them a quart jar of water. I guarantee you won't have blossom end rot.

If you don't have sheet rock mud dissolve some sheet rock scraps in 5 gallons of water.
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#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 09:40 AM

My stupid question is can I buy a couple of gallons of milk and pour it around the plants to help add calcium?

Thanks,
Bill

:bigrofl: I don't think that would have enough in it to help. But you can try. Daniel would be very happy to sell you some!
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#6 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 11:00 AM

:bigrofl: I don't think that would have enough in it to help. But you can try. Daniel would be very happy to sell you some!


Probably not. The smell of spoiled milk is something I have not grown used to even though I spent my early years on dairy farms. Not saying your milk is spoiled Daniel but it would probably do so laying on the ground at 80*+.

Bill

Edited by GTTinkerer, June 21, 2012 - 11:01 AM.


#7 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 11:07 AM

Within a couple hours, you'd likely not have any deer problem from the stink! Milk wouldn't give much calcium relief I wouldn't think, unless the plant would drink 8oz a day, and eat a 1/2 pint of yogurt too! LOL Sounds like sheet rock solution is the best. But then the foreign sheet rock may have melomine in it!

#8 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 11:30 AM

Bone meal is a ready source of calcium for gardening and is readily absorbed by the plant. I learned this from a soil analyst who works with local farmers.

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#9 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 02:53 PM

Bone meal is a ready source of calcium for gardening and is readily absorbed by the plant. I learned this from a soil analyst who works with local farmers.

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I forgot about bone meal! Haven't used that in years.

#10 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 05:14 PM

Good discussion guys. I have had that problem in the past so I'm going to get some bone meal on them.

#11 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 05:21 PM

I forgot to mention why I haven't used bone meal for years. Used to be used as a cattle feed ingredient, but was outlawed due to the "Mad Cow" disease. Some speak against using it for plants, but most scientists say it is perfectly safe. I found that ground oyster shells are up to 39% calcium, where bone meal is more phosphorous than calcium.

#12 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 06:50 PM

Hmm, my tomatoes have not yet got to the point of blossom rot popping up, but it seems to be worse some years over others.
The Bone meal seems to be the ticket. I read a lot on organic gardening and it is an ingredient in most home blended fertilizers.
I can probably get it at the Earl May Store(that's a gardening supply chain in Iowa,minnesota,Nebraska & Missouri.
Or is this something a farm supply store like TSC would have?

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 21, 2012 - 06:52 PM.


#13 HALFSCALE ONLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2012 - 09:34 PM

Blossum rot on tomatoes and peppers comes from being too dry, with a nitrogen and pottassium deficeincy. when it gets dry it locks up nitrogen and pottassium in the ground. and the plant can't get it. there are sprays that you can apply ,but once it starts it won't stop until it has cleaned off all fruit that is now on. spread some fertilizer around will help and keep watered, and what is coming in blossum now can be saved
Black spot comes from over watering, that shows anywhere on the fruit and even after picked ,where ever it sits against it leaves a black spot and doesn't keep very long.
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