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59 Chevy/cummins-6


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#1 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted June 15, 2012 - 09:16 PM

Started working on closing in the firewall and decided that the fitting for the water temperature gauge is still going to be hard to reach so I have decided to move it.
The first thing to do is remove the gauge fitting an plug the hole.

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Most engines have other places in the head where you can hook up a temperature gauge or a hose fitting.
This engine does not have any other places to do that.
I removed the heater outlet fitting on the front of the engine and took a look down inside.
There is enough room in the water cavity so I'm going to move the gauge fitting to the front.
Here I'm starting to drill out the hole.

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Once the hole is drilled out to the correct size, I thread it with a 1/2 NPT tap.

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The gauge fitting is installed and the heater hose line is hooked back up.

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Now I can go back to work on the firewall.
I bolted a 1 inch wood spacer to the back of the block.

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Then I started making the cardboard template for the firewall and fastened it to the wood with thumb tacks.

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The side sections are fitted and held in place with tape.

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I use a piece of wood to mark where the cut needs to be for clearance above the bell housing.

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Once the template is finished, I trace it out on a piece of metal and cut it out.

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The metal is then formed and tack welded in place on the firewall.

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The front of the floor panel had to be trimmed back a little and then I fastened it back in place.

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A template is made up for the bell housing cover.
This piece is going to be riveted on instead of welding it so it is cut out of a piece of galvanized steel.

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The bell housing cover is fastened in place.
Both the floor panel and this bell housing cover were sealed with a bead of silicone sealant before they were fastened down.

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The rest of the metal pieces are fit on the firewall and everything is welded in place.
Then all the seams are sealed with sealant.
I know it looks nasty but this will all be covered with a rubberized firewall insulation so you won't be able to see any of these seams.

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#2 bowtiebutler956 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 15, 2012 - 09:44 PM

That is a very cool project, and you do fantastic work! :thumbs:

Matt
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#3 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted June 15, 2012 - 10:13 PM

Looking awesome Ray.
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#4 Kyocum OFFLINE  

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Posted June 15, 2012 - 10:59 PM

jdcrawler kewl project and your fabrication skills are fabulous. That's gonna be a sweet ride when you are done. Twin turbos maybe.
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#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2012 - 05:14 AM

Ray, that looks great! Glad you moved the temperature gauge fitting, that did look a bit hard to get to. Every post you make is like a mini tutorial. Awesome work!
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#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2012 - 06:01 AM

I'm enjoying this topic Ray. It's a great chance to see all the problems that come up when doing an engine swap and how to deal with them.
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#7 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2012 - 07:56 AM

Great job Ray, you make the sheet metal fab work look easy!! Keep the updates coming.
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#8 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2012 - 11:09 PM

You have to love cardboard when it comes to these projects. Another thing that I have found that is cheap (free) and works well is coroplast. This is the plastic cardboard material that political signs are made out of.
Your work looks very nice.
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#9 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted June 18, 2012 - 02:06 PM

The blower for the heater was mounted out under the fender and drew air from the cab and passed it over the heater core and back into the cab thru the firewall.
The new heat / air conditioning system is designed to fit completely inside the cab and has it's own blower so this one is no longer needed.
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The complete blower and housing was removed and the hole was sealed up with galvanized metal.
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The sheet metal on the inside was cleaned with enamel reducer and primed.
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The rough edges and welds were ground down around the cutout on the firewall.
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This was then cleaned and primed also and glazing putty was put around the edge to fill any nicks or scratches.
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#10 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted June 18, 2012 - 04:55 PM

That will be an awesome ride when you get it finished, Ray! The care and devotion to making it right are showing in each update! Bet your ready to take it for a spin!
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#11 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted June 18, 2012 - 08:30 PM

Looking great Ray, keep it up, appreciate the update.
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#12 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted June 20, 2012 - 10:34 AM

The stock heater on these trucks was a small box heater that sat inside under the dash.
The heater that I used when I first built this back in 95 was a larger heater and the heater core was on the outside of the firewall.
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I had to cut away some of the seam lip where the firewall joined the cowl.
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Because the heater will no longer be mounted on the outside of the firewall, I have restored that section of lip that was removed.
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The firewall really looks bad now with all the holes that have been cut into it so I'm going to make a cover panel to fit over it.
The indented areas are filled in with pieces of plywood that are glued to the metal.
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Once the glue has dried , the wood is sanded down so it is flush with the raised parts of the firewall and every thing is primed.
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Then I can start making a pattern of for the cover panel.
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The panel is made out of aluminum and temporarily mounted in place.
This panel is bolted to the firewall using the mounting holes that the stock heater was bolted to.
The new heat / air units also bolt to these same mounting holes.
The upper part fits tight to the firewall but the lower part has about a 1/2 inch air space between it and the floor.
This will help keep the heat from the exhaust pipe away from the floor.
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Edited by jdcrawler, June 20, 2012 - 10:37 AM.

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#13 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted June 20, 2012 - 04:07 PM

Nice progress Ray. I just don't understand why you needed the plywood if you were making a panel to cover those areas anyway...
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#14 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted June 20, 2012 - 04:50 PM

I just don't understand why you needed the plywood if you were making a panel to cover those areas anyway...


If i mount anything to that panel in the area that is indented it would buckle the panel in until it came up against the firewall.
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#15 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted June 20, 2012 - 06:14 PM

I have to say that the cover looks 500% better than just the wood. Looks great.
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