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These Kids Today


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#16 IHCubGuy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 10, 2012 - 09:49 PM

I like that "trick"! I'm not sure I've ever seen it expressed that way, though I have had cashiers count the change into my hands, more or less as you described. I typically use credit as much as possible since my card "rewards" me. But I have had cashiers look at me strangely when I thow in extra change so I can get a quarter or a dime back and get rid of some pennies.


Have had strange looks at the drive thru doing that get rid of the pennies and small change trick. Problem there is they don't have to think cause they just type it in the register and it spits back a change number at them.

#17 middleageddeere OFFLINE  

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Posted June 11, 2012 - 04:42 AM

Well, I know I am asking for it with this post but here goes....
I have to disagree with you guys on this one. I agree with the point that it is annoying when young adults (?) don't know how to give change back and if that is part of your job you should know it hands down...However, as a certified teacher I do not think that they should be drilling it in school like we did. The fact is that by the time these kids are in the work force, they are gonna be using touchscreens and have a personal robot to give the change back. It is not a valuable use of our time to teach these basic skills anymore, there just isn't enough time in school to accomplish that and teach using computers/technology and higher level skills. If we want to compete in the world market this has to be the model for schools.
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#18 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 11, 2012 - 06:13 AM

I agree with the premise of competition in a global society, and understand the problem with only so many hours in a day to do the best you can with brains full of video game, hormones, and teenage angst, but still believe that basic math skills (counting to 100 being one of them...) is important.

I didn't mean any slight to good teachers who try, and reading back thru my post, I see too many generalities. My Father was in public education and I understand more than some what you go thru daily. My beef is more with our particular elementary schools here. The math they teach is only to get them into the next grade with no practical applications given. Lessons become dissociated with reality for the kids and learning math becomes more of a chore than it needs to be. As for the specifics of counting change, I had a confab with a teacher once over a homework assignment. They were to add up the coins pictured on the paper. Downfall was, the images were so poor, that I had difficulty figuring out what was what. Obvious lack of caring on the part of the teacher.

As for the higher math skills, I think that Practical applications are a valuable tool in anything. If you make me try to learn something new, one of the questions I ask mentally is "Do I need to learn this, how will it help me in my job/life/etc?".
My attention span is determined by the answer.

#19 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 11, 2012 - 11:32 AM

Let us not forget that the human brain is an amazing tool that constantly compares new information to what it already has experienced, that is a very loose explanation of how it "learns". So when we short change the process by not building a proper foundation we tend to create "technical expertise" that doesn't adapt well to changing input because there is nothing to compare to. So, granted many of my students will not use Algebra in their everyday life, (welders, carpenters, engineers, machinists, etc. please don't be offended), however the step by step logical process of taking larger complex problems and breaking them down into simpler and manageable steps in a orderly and definable sequence trains the brain how to think through other complex problems in life very well.
Many of our schools are removing the long honored skill set of cursive writing from the curriculum as to "involved and tedious" (not necessary) for today's society, but once again they have forgotten that it takes numerous eye hand and brain interactions (fine motor skills) to do cursive writing. Typing on a key board takes many less connections between the brain and the body. The question becomes "if we are no longer developing those portions of the brain then what other skills might we be loosing along the way?"
Absolutely, technical skills are needed in today's society but lets quit shortchanging the foundation until it is ready to accept the structure.
Another thought, the comment was made that as adults we always consider what is the usefulness of this "new" information to my everyday life? That is one of the basic premises of adult education (andragogy) vs. pedagogy (education for children) this is another reason why learning the application is vital to true understanding of concepts.
And finally, the comment of "I never learned this until I was 30", I'm with you my friend....The Brain Research Institute has clearly determined that many males never start to leave "two dimensional thinking" for "three dimensional thinking" until sometime in their 20's. Remember the old saying "I can't believe how smart the old-man got while I was away in the Army?"

#20 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted June 11, 2012 - 12:07 PM

Interesting thread but it is also a little bit of dejavu.
I can remember my dad and his friends voicing some of the same complaints way back in the 60's when I was one of those "dumb kids".
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#21 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted June 12, 2012 - 05:29 AM

Well, I know I am asking for it with this post but here goes....
I have to disagree with you guys on this one. I agree with the point that it is annoying when young adults (?) don't know how to give change back and if that is part of your job you should know it hands down...However, as a certified teacher I do not think that they should be drilling it in school like we did. The fact is that by the time these kids are in the work force, they are gonna be using touchscreens and have a personal robot to give the change back. It is not a valuable use of our time to teach these basic skills anymore, there just isn't enough time in school to accomplish that and teach using computers/technology and higher level skills. If we want to compete in the world market this has to be the model for schools.


I don't think it requires much drilling or much time. I taught the kid in my original post how to count change in just a few short minutes.

My other concern about not teaching the basics is that who is going to engineer the robots and touch screens if nobody knows the basics. Sure they can arrive at the standard answers using lesser machines to build more complex machines, but those "aha! moments" and happy mistakes that have traditionally fuelled the creative process tend to happen in the shower or while half asleep etc., when the technology isn't at hand. A lot of the creative process tends to be related to knowing the subject matter intuitively.

Perhaps we need more class time, at least for older kids, since there is more subject matter now. Perhaps we need to evaluate things differently and give more credit for self-learning, freeing up valuable class time.

#22 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted June 12, 2012 - 05:33 AM

Interesting thread but it is also a little bit of dejavu.
I can remember my dad and his friends voicing some of the same complaints way back in the 60's when I was one of those "dumb kids".


Very true, jdcrawler. Like I said, it was my parents who taught us. By the time I hit school it was already gone from the curriculum. So now we have two or three generations who never learned it.

#23 Canawler OFFLINE  

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Posted June 12, 2012 - 01:07 PM

If you really want to mess up a kid at the cash register, pay with "foreign" currency, the two dollar bill. :laughingteeth:




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