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Electrolysis Rust Removal System


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#31 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2010 - 07:35 PM

Many thanks to Chuck and Dan for answering most of my questions.

I'm thinking about making my own tank for this project to conserve space. If I proceed with this, then the tank would be long enough and deep enough and wide enough to allow me to totally submerse the complete frame of any Case tractor I am restoring. That would also allow me to dip hoods and fenders totally, as well.

My thoughts are to make the tank from 3/4" fir plywood and then line the tank with plastic sheeting that is sealed with silicone at the joints. I'd put a large drain in the bottom of it that is controlled by a plastic ball valve to make it easy to empty it and then flush it clean with fresh water. Let me run this by you guys.

Is there any reason why I could not place a series of rebar rods about six inches part on the bottom of the tank and just weld one piece of rebar to each of the rods at one end along with a single rod that would be vertical and stick above the waterline by six inches? Would such a placement cause the action to take place only on the side of the frame facing the rods? I'm thinking about the fact that my tank would be very rectangular and I'd like to be able to just drop the frame or hood in the tank, leave it for a day and find it mostly stripped but for the tougher spots Dan spoke about.

Case frames are a bit of PITA to strip because the dash support is integral with the frame. Rust on a frame is nearly non-existent. Any rust is usually surface rust and not crusty, flakey rust.

Media blasting these frames is time consuming and expensive. I was going to make my own, large blast cabinet so that I could recover the blasting media many times until it would cut any more. Open air blasting means you use the media once and the cost rises quickly. On top of that, it's hot, dirty, sweaty work and you are running your compressor full out for whatever time it takes.


If that does not sound like a good idea, then please feel free to make suggestions. It's better to discuss options then to build something that doesn't work the way you want it to.

#32 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2010 - 08:04 PM

The only problem with your design hydriv, is that this is "line of sight" action, so if you only have rods on the bottom, it will mainly get only the bottom portions & some of the sides. None of top areas would be gotten. What you would need is to do as you said on the bottom, then go up all sides also. Then maybe you could have a few bars welded in a frame that you could have hinged on the top edge of tank to hinge over & into the top of the solution to get the top areas. You need all angles covered for complete coverage of removal action. Inside my frame I didn't have good line of sight, so I had one portable anode I suspended inside the frame sides. It got the job done, but took a bit more scraping to get all the paint off. Still, much better than sandblasting in my book.
When I blast outside with my pot blaster, I do it on a large tarp to catch most of my media. When I use all my media, I pull the tarp & gather it back up, run through a screen, then re-use till finished. Like you said...very labor/money intensive & no fun at all. I like electrolysis much better.

#33 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2010 - 09:28 PM

Interesting. I'll have to think on this for a bit. The rebar should last for quite some time, don't you think? I can't image the rods dissipating and needing replacement after even 10 frames.

#34 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2010 - 09:42 PM

They would last a long time I'd say. The more rods you use, the longer they will last. After doing my entire frame, front axle & tie rods, my rods just have a thin rusty coat on them, no sign at all of erosion.

#35 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted July 07, 2010 - 09:20 AM

Do you believe that proximity of the rods to the item being cleaned matters to any great degree? There must be some point where the electricity won't cause the boiling action you witnessed. If so, then my logic would indicate that the boiling action would be increased as a result of the rods being closer to the item.

What diameter of rod are you using? Just curious.

#36 jdslednut ONLINE  

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Posted July 07, 2010 - 08:06 PM

Any idea about things like axles that may have bronze bushings in them? Will this cause a toxic reaction or ruin the bearings?

#37 jdslednut ONLINE  

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Posted July 07, 2010 - 10:40 PM

Picked up some rebar and baking soda tonght. Now just to find some time to set it up.

#38 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2010 - 08:24 AM

Picked up some rebar and baking soda tonght. Now just to find some time to set it up.


You need washing soda, not baking soda. baking soda is sodium bicarbonate, you need sodium carbonate.

Washing soda if found with the laundry detergent.

#39 joe OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2010 - 10:39 AM

olcowhand you can also use one gallon of vinegar in this, It amplify the time it take to clean the paint and rust off the frame

#40 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2010 - 10:55 AM

Joe, Please clarify. Are you saying to use just vinegar? Or are you saying that by adding vinegar to the washing soda solution that paint removal is faster?

If it is the latter, then what is the ratio of vinegar to the washing soda/water combo needed to get the desired results?

And is that.... white vinegar, malt vinegar, apple cider vinegar, balsamic vinegar, cane vinegar, red wine vinegar, coconut vinegar, white wine vinegar, sherry vinegar, rice vinegar or one that I don't know about? :D:D:D:D:bigrofl:


We need a little precision here.

#41 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2010 - 11:13 AM


And is that.... white vinegar, malt vinegar, apple cider vinegar, balsamic vinegar, cane vinegar, red wine vinegar, coconut vinegar, white wine vinegar, sherry vinegar, rice vinegar or one that I don't know about? :D:D:D:D:bigrofl:


We need a little precision here.


hydriv,
Sometimes you slay me.:bigrofl::bigrofl::bigrofl:

#42 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2010 - 04:38 PM

Baking soda IS what I am using. Sodium bicarb work fine, just that sodium carbonate works a tick better. I believe washing soda is still bicarb though. To get straight sodium carbonate, you find that at swinning pool supply centers.

#43 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2010 - 10:01 PM

If washing soda works better than baking soda then all you would have to do is wash it off!!!! Baking soda has worked great in my bucket to strip paint off 2 fenders,

#44 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 09, 2010 - 07:46 AM

Washing soda is sodium carbonate

In chemistry, it is often used as an electrolyte. This is because electrolytes are usually salt-based, and sodium carbonate acts as a very good conductor in the process of electrolysis. Additionally, unlike chloride ions which form chlorine gas, carbonate ions are not corrosive to the anodes.



#45 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2010 - 10:34 AM

Well, the frame is ready for paint prep work.


Posted Image

Edited by olcowhand, July 10, 2010 - 10:40 AM.





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