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Par For The Course


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#1 Enginerd OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 11:13 PM

A couple of weeks ago I picked up a 42" tiller for my GT20. In the past I've been tilling with a 22" tiller on my 7.25hp gear driven Bolens, so I've been looking forward to having a wider path and a hydrostatic drive so I can till slower.

The new (to me) attachment It was a little neglected, so when I got it home I cleaned and regreased the gearbox, lubed the chains, got new belts, etc. The night before I needed to turn in the garden I hooked it up, fired up the tractor, pulled the rear PTO switch, and the tractor died.

The wiring on my GT20 is a little wonky, and I thought I had tested the rear PTO in the past, but apparently I was thinking of a different tractor.

So I've spent the last week and a half pouring over electrical schematics, swapping switches and relays,etc. Last night I figured out how to jump the safety and get the rear PTO to engage without messing up any of the other operations. Woohoo!

I was itching to test it out, but of course I've already tilled the garden with the Bolens, and now it's all planted. However, my kids wanted to plant some popping corn, and since there was no room left in the garden my wife suggested I till a small patch just outside the fence this afternoon.

I got the GT over to the planned location, engaged the PTO, throttled up the engine, and slowly lowered the tiller until it was chopping about two inches of sod. I then slowly crept forward and immediatly snagged a rock and snapped the drive chain on the tiller...

Time to get out a shovel and a hoe.

#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2012 - 04:13 AM

Boy, that thing is challenging you. Good luck with it!

#3 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2012 - 05:47 AM

Must have been quite the rock! I was thinking those chains are fairly heavy built. That would be frustrating to have a new attachment and the season almost over before you get to use it.

#4 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2012 - 07:50 AM

I feel your pain. Hope the repair isn't too bad.

Do you have sweet corn planted anywhere near the spot where you are planning on planting the popcorn?

You may get some cross pollination if you do. Sweet corn with hard outsides and popcorn that doesn't. Just keep it in mind.

#5 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2012 - 09:08 AM

That sounds like one of my projects. I know it doesn't help much but I feel your pain, but usually, at least for me, once I go through and get everything working correctly then what ever the piece of equipment is will be OK and work as advertised. Hang in there and you'll get it all fixed up as good as new.

#6 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2012 - 10:20 AM

Are you sure that we're not related? That sure sounds like the kind of luck that I have too! That's a real downer when that stuff happens! Just as a suggestion, maybe you could pick up a moldboard plow and run a few passes through the sod before tilling next time. It will show you where the rocks are and as long as they're not too big it should bring them up where you can get them out. I'm sure that you'll get it fixed up soon and be back in business!

#7 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2012 - 01:30 PM

I feel your pain. Hope the repair isn't too bad.

Do you have sweet corn planted anywhere near the spot where you are planning on planting the popcorn?

You may get some cross pollination if you do. Sweet corn with hard outsides and popcorn that doesn't. Just keep it in mind.


Cross pollination won't affect this years crop, but it will affect future crops from the cross pollinated seeds.
  • MH81 said thank you

#8 Enginerd OFFLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2012 - 08:50 PM

Thanks for all the well wishes. It's nice to know I'm not the only one with bad luck :-)

Just as a suggestion, maybe you could pick up a moldboard plow and run a few passes through the sod before tilling next time. It will show you where the rocks are and as long as they're not too big it should bring them up where you can get them out.


Excellent idea. I like having something to search for on craigslist.

Do you have sweet corn planted anywhere near the spot where you are planning on planting the popcorn? You may get some cross pollination if you do.

Cross pollination won't affect this years crop, but it will affect future crops from the cross pollinated seeds.

Thanks for "planting that seed". I'm not the gardener, the Mrs. is. I just use her hobby as an excuse to buy toys. That said, we've decided to stagger the planting by 4 weeks just to make sure there are no cross polination issues.
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