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#1 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 06:56 AM

Kennys Memorial post has reminded me of a wonderfull History Lesson I've found and that I'd like to share. And encourage others to do the same.
School Textbooks tell us little of the real history of our Republic. The best lesson is Her people. I was led by the discovery of an old family (1821) letter I discovered that led me to an interest in the genealogy of my forefathers and in particular their day-to-day lives. Pretty much by accident, I found a great deal about them and in their contemporaries. They settled in Northern Kentucky in 1792-yep 1792. The best lesson was about all the families of those times.

We can't imagine -today-how difficult life was. Folks died from practically any minor ailment. They were fiercely independant-fiercely patriotic.Whenever and wherever a fight or war broke out-they showed up musket in hand. You would be hard-pressed to find a non-voter once the time came.

Neighbor helped neighbor. A brother of my great-great grandfather fought and died in a duel held because his honor was questioned. Cheaters and liers had a pretty short life span. I encourage anyone and the younger generations in particular, to look at the value of those times and how good it would be if just a little of it was still with us today.
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#2 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 07:12 AM

Adversity breeds growth and self reliance, adversities of the past are forgotten and breed complacency.

I hope we don't have to learn those lessons again the hard way, reading history is much less painful and time consuming than making the same mistakes again.
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#3 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 07:17 AM

Adversity breeds growth and self reliance, adversities of the past are forgotten and breed complacency.

I hope we don't have to learn those lessons again the hard way, reading history is much less painful and time consuming than making the same mistakes again.

Absolutely

#4 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 07:42 AM

Wow, Lee! That's a long ways back there. And that was wayyyyyyyy out in the sticks, back then!
Alan, I couldn't agree more!

#5 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 07:53 AM

I had hoped to point out that there are thousands or stories of patriotism, and heroism that are about obscure, forgotten people from cities and towns that THEY built. Few of us know of the Spanish American War or the Blackhawk War or other tribal wars. James Taylor was a brother to my GGG grandmother and a prominent ,wealthy citizen. He died on election day in 1848, but not before an election official traveled by wagon to his home to record his vote. He voted Whig for his cousin Zach Taylor. After which he is quoted as saying "I have fired one last shot for my country". Yet, few know of this man. And few know that the same Ohio River that brought many from Virginia to Kentucky, soon brought floods and The plague and Typhoid. When prime Ohio River bottomland was $1 an acre (from pounds-sterling to todays $) a slave would sell from $100-$400. Its sad to me that its these tiny obscure stories that are mostly absent from schoolbooks and they tell important facts about who were are.

#6 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 07:54 AM

Wow, Lee! That's a long ways back there. And that was wayyyyyyyy out in the sticks, back then!
Alan, I couldn't agree more!


Sticks are about all that was there Kenny.
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#7 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 07:58 AM

Wow, Lee! That's a long ways back there. And that was wayyyyyyyy out in the sticks, back then!
Alan, I couldn't agree more!


No kidding Kenny-Where you and I are sitting , everyone wore moccasins. :bounce:
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#8 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 08:07 AM

Thanks for sharing those details of your families history with us Lee! Despite the adversities that they faced, Honor and integrity were more important than living a dishonorable life. People were of a stronger character back then for sure!
There's a book called "Lies my Teacher told me" by James W. Loewen that tells some of the fallacies that are perpetuated in today's textbooks. It's a good read.
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#9 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 08:27 AM

Thanks for sharing those details of your families history with us Lee! Despite the adversities that they faced, Honor and integrity were more important than living a dishonorable life. People were of a stronger character back then for sure!
There's a book called "Lies my Teacher told me" by James W. Loewen that tells some of the fallacies that are perpetuated in today's textbooks. It's a good read.

Sounds like a heavy lesson on "trust but verify"

#10 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 08:37 AM

Sounds like a heavy lesson on "trust but verify"


To be fair, we learn the same un-truths that they have learned. It's not the Teacher's fault. In most cases the ones that do know the truth would be severely reprimanded for deviating from the accepted norm of the textbook. I'm not trying to put our Teachers down at all. They are for the most part a worthy bunch who take joy in educating our young.
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#11 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 09:37 AM

To be fair, we learn the same un-truths that they have learned. It's not the Teacher's fault. In most cases the ones that do know the truth would be severely reprimanded for deviating from the accepted norm of the textbook. I'm not trying to put our Teachers down at all. They are for the most part a worthy bunch who take joy in educating our young.


I agree. Whether we learn any subject, the path from fact to learning is much like the old parlor game where something is whispered to a person sitting at the table and whispered/repeated again and again around to the last player. Only to find out that what he heard was far different from the original story. Accuracy is dependant on the dillegence and motive of each person in the link. We have the same issue today with the news, politics etc. The few stories I've related from the dozens I've learned thus far wouldn't make a good movie or book and have little life away from the local towns where they occured, but they are a genuine glimpse of our land. The best thing of all is that they are from simple court house records absent of any ulterior motive to alter fabricate the record.

#12 Kurtee OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 09:45 AM

Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. There is lots of stuff that gets ignored in the history books. One thing pointed out to me a coupla years back is that history is written by the victors. Think about it, what is the history of the Native American, the Confederate States and you can think of others. How about WW2? How many know that we had invasion troops shipboard bound for Japan when the bombs were dropped? These became occupation troops when the Japanese surrendered. How do I know this? One of these GIs was my neighbor in another town. Just some things to think about. KURTEE

Edited by Kurtee, May 27, 2012 - 09:46 AM.

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#13 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 09:58 AM

Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. There is lots of stuff that gets ignored in the history books. One thing pointed out to me a coupla years back is that history is written by the victors. Think about it, what is the history of the Native American, the Confederate States and you can think of others. How about WW2? How many know that we had invasion troops shipboard bound for Japan when the bombs were dropped? These became occupation troops when the Japanese surrendered. How do I know this? One of these GIs was my neighbor in another town. Just some things to think about. KURTEE


Maybe the best lesson of all is that we should have enough interest in any subject, to make the effort to dig out the truth.If not, then we become part of the falsehood.

#14 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2012 - 01:45 PM

History is always more interesting when personalized, in my opinion. Too often it's taught as a series of dates and events along with pictures of famous dead people, but to me that means little. Real history is made up the lives of ordinary people and how successful those famous guys were can really be judged by whether they managed the lives of the ordinary people.

I don't care much about the Pharoahs for instance, but I am very interested in seeing shows or reading about how the ordinary people lived. That goes for wars too. I'm not too interested in what the generals and politicians said or did, but I am interested in the effect they had on ordinary soldiers and the civilians caught in the middle.
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