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Tires That Won't Come Off The Rim


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#1 Tennblue59 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 02:18 PM

Front tires on the Ford LGT165 don't hold air - leak down to flat in less than 24 hours, and they were getting pretty dry rotted. So I got one of those Harbor Freight mini-tire changers (on sale and with coupons, was $30.00).

****Pause for a mini-review****
Actually not a bad item. You need to mount it STOUTLY to a stable surface - first set of lag bolts I used were too small and pulled out... The tire can spin on the changer (there is no pin to hold the tire still), so you have to hold the tire/rim with one hand (or a knee) while you work the tool with the other hand. The tire "spoon" seems to be well built and works well. The bead breaker is a 2 piece cast aluminum thing that looks a little frail -not sure if it will hold up.... But the tool has lasted through 5 tires so far - all 6-8" rims (figuring out how to work it with small stuff first....) with no signs of breakage. Advertised to work on rims up to 12 inch. Will see how it does with the Ford's rear tires 23x8.5x12..... Lube is critical with these things though (dont do it - leave it alone........). I experimented with Simply Green and undiluted dish soap (thumbs up!!!!!)

Anyway, I couldn't get the bead to break on one tire. Bead breaker on the tire changer (and my arm) wouldn't budge it. Hand sledge wouldn't work either... I even tried using the teeth from my excavator bucket to press the tire loose from the rim (worked on one tire but not the other). Finally put it in the hydraulic press and used a piece of bar and the ram against the sidewall to unseat it! Some rust had built up under/behind the lip of the tire seat and was holding it fast. Guess that tire had been on there a LONG time.....

So gonna sandblast and etch/paint the rims before putting the new tires on. But is nice to be able to change them myself wihtout making a couple trips in to town (one to remove, home to clean and paint the rims, and back to town to reinstall) to get them done at the tire place.

So what's your "secret" method for getting those stuborn tires to come off the rim - besides taking them to the tire store?
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#2 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 02:35 PM

I hook the trailer onto my truck, then place some blocks between the trailer frame and the rim, and crank the jack on the trailer down onto the sidewall near the rim to pop the bead off the rim.

Edited by Chuck_050382, May 17, 2012 - 02:36 PM.

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#3 DanP OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 03:09 PM

Handy Man jack up against something that won't move, put the foot of the jack right by the bead. Have done that for years.

#4 DanP OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 03:17 PM

I read the reviews on this and it sounds like the base is to small for bigger wheels. Let us know how it works on your 12" tires.

#5 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 03:29 PM

Spray penetrating oil around the bead, between the tire and the rim, and let it work down between the two for about ten minutes. Shouldn't have a problem getting it loose then.
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#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 06:51 PM

Spray penetrating oil around the bead, between the tire and the rim, and let it work down between the two for about ten minutes. Shouldn't have a problem getting it loose then.


You would think so Troy but I had a set of fronts on an MF8 that were pretty much welded to the rim. I ended up cutting the tire off the bead with a jig saw and then I was able to pry the bead off using an unreasonable amount of force. It seems that the fronts are the worst offenders. I think they are filled with air more often and collect moisture over the years that rusts the rims. I guess thats another good reason to have a dryer on your compressor!
I found a picture of one of those rims.
rusty wheel.jpg

#7 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 07:14 PM

I have an old sign post with a piece of angle iron on it. I put the tire on the step under the shed, position the post in the gap under the shed and make sure the angle is located where it needs to be.

6' of leverage works pretty well. It's a system developed in a desperation moment. :blush2:
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#8 Kurtee OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 07:18 PM

OK here are some tricks I have used on ATV tires, which may work for these too. First I try hot water around the bead, the hotter the better, I pour it around the bead and wait awhile. Then the slide hammer comes into play. If this doesn't work, I use a torch on the rim at the bead location, small propane usually works. Heat seems to be the key. If this doesn't do the trick, I build a big fire in the fire pit and throw the whole works in, works great, just take the rim out of the ashes and repaint, install new bearings and you are good to go. JUST KIDDING HERE, DO NOT BURN TIRES, no matter how frustrated you are. I have had to cut some off also.

KURTEE
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#9 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 07:20 PM

I have an old sign post with a piece of angle iron on it. I put the tire on the step under the shed, position the post in the gap under the shed and make sure the angle is located where it needs to be.

6' of leverage works pretty well. It's a system developed in a desperation moment. :blush2:




:wewantpics: :wewantvideo:
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#10 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 07:27 PM

You want pics of an out of shape, overweight guy hanging on an old signpost trying to break down a tire???

Okeedokee, next time I have to break on down, you got it...

Just remember Will, you asked for it... LOL

#11 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 07:37 PM

You never know, LAGT may pick up on it. LOL

#12 ckjakline OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 07:40 PM

I use 2 bigger screw drivers for front wheels,and the tire changer for the rears.For the stubborn rusted bead tires i use pb blaster penetrating oil.And as a last resort the sawzall.I only had to use it once the tire was beyond shot sidewall was torn and kept tearing so it was best to cut it off.

#13 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 08:02 PM

I pay the mechanic to fight with it. $10-$20 to keep me from breaking something is worth it.

#14 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 08:29 PM

I have had a few stubborn ones from time to time. I bought one of those tire "spoons" from TSC and have found that it's a good way to push the sidewall down far enough to work a large flat screwdriver (and then another one beside it) into where the bead seats. A little muscle and a lot of patience (a little PB Blaster can be your friend also) and I haven't had to cut one off...yet. The key I think is to get the screwdriver over the top of the bead where all the reinforcing wires are located. The one that I use has a nice wide blade and sometimes just twisting it while working the other one in does the trick.

#15 wawcub47 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2012 - 08:38 PM

I use my HF changer on fronts with lube. the back wheels is a different story. I try to break them down by driving my pick up around the edge of the rim. Seems to work ok for me.




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