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59 Chevy / Cummins -1


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#1 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2012 - 03:18 PM

When I pulled the engine and transmission, the bottom of the flywheel housing and transmission was caked with grease so I knew that the rear engine seal or the front transmission seal ( or both ) were leaking.

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So the first thing to do was to separate the transmission from the engine.

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After pulling the flywheel ring gear, I could see the the rear engine seal had been leaking.

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I've replace a lot of rear engine seals but this one is different from anything that I've ever worked on.
For one thing, it's huge ( 5 inch diameter ).
I've always used a light lubricant on rear seals to help them slide up over the crank.
However, this one is very insistent that it be installed completely dry.
I cleaned the area with lacquer thinner so the cleaner didn't leave any film and dried it off with paper towel.

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Then the new seal was installed according to the instructions.

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The new seal came with a plastic inner sleeve that fit on the end of the crank so the lip of the seal would slide onto the crank without any scuffing.
Then you use the steel ring and a plastic hammer and tap the seal in until the steel ring is seated all the way around.
This makes sure the seal is square in the bore and set to the right depth.

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Last thing to do is bolt the flywheel back on.

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Edited by jdcrawler, May 08, 2012 - 03:21 PM.

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#2 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2012 - 03:35 PM

lookin good
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#3 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2012 - 03:46 PM

Dang, that's a big seal. How many ATM's did you rob to buy it? LOL Glad that is out of you way. I'm looking forward to when you get this beast installed and go for a drive.
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#4 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2012 - 04:51 PM

The reason the seal goes in dry is because after you start the engine the shaft will slightly burn the seal, and make it seal. If you lube the seal then the edge of the seal doesn't burn and it will leak. Cummins always recommends that their seals go in dry.
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#5 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2012 - 05:17 PM

Great progress Ray.
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#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2012 - 07:25 PM

Thanks fo posting this Ray. That's good info. to know. It's a lot easier to do that now then to have to pull the engine later!
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#7 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2012 - 07:36 PM

If you look at the old seal, you should see that the lip of the seal is a darker color. This is where the seal has burned and created the sealing surface. Cummins has used this type of seal for years.
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#8 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2012 - 09:00 PM

If you look at the old seal, you should see that the lip of the seal is a darker color. This is where the seal has burned and created the sealing surface. Cummins has used this type of seal for years.

That's interesting to know.
Hopefully, I got it clean and dry enough so it won't leak.

#9 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2012 - 04:10 AM

I worked as a truck/diesel/heavy equipment mechanic for 25 years. I've never had one of those B-Series motors apart, but I have rebuilt quite a few of the bigger N-Series motors. It would interesting to see how similar it is to the bigger motors. I know the injection system is different.
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#10 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2012 - 04:44 AM

Are you going to use the aftercooler as well?
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#11 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2012 - 06:29 AM

This has an aluminum cross over pipe from the turbo to the intake manafold so I'm not sure what the aftercooler is ?

Question ...
I'm using the aluminum radiator for the GM 6.2 and it has a cooler built into it to run the engine oil lines too.
Would it benefit me to run oil lines from the Cummins thru the radiator cooler ?
If so .. where do I tap into the block for an oil line out and a return oil line ?

#12 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2012 - 06:33 AM

I just went back and looked, it doesn't have an aftercooler, if it did it would be mounted in front of the radiator. Also the motor should have an oil cooler on the side of the block, it looks like it has one behind the oil filter.

Edited by Amigatec, May 09, 2012 - 06:34 AM.

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#13 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2012 - 07:03 AM

I just went back and looked, it doesn't have an aftercooler, if it did it would be mounted in front of the radiator. Also the motor should have an oil cooler on the side of the block, it looks like it has one behind the oil filter.

Thanks for the input.
I did an internet search for "Cummins oil cooler" so I could see what you're talking about so running additional oil lines up to the radiator probably wouldn't make any difference.

I'm using the stock Dodge transmission cooler in front the radiator and I'm putting an aluminum oil pan on the transmission to help cool the transmission fluid.

I'll just cap the holes in my radiator for the oil lines and transmission lines so nothing gets in them.

Edited by jdcrawler, May 09, 2012 - 07:05 AM.


#14 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2012 - 07:16 AM

That round unit behind the turbo should be the cooler, it may have oil lines running to it. On the bigger motors it has the oil filter mounted to it as well.
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#15 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2012 - 12:50 PM

Pulled the torque converter and put in a new front pump seal on the transmission.
Then I stood it up and pulled the pan off to change the filter.
The old filter doesn't look bad at all with just a small sludge spot on it.
I couldn't see any metal grit in the pan so I was happy with that.

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I'm using a deeper aluminum pan so the new filter has a spacer so it sits down farther into the pan.

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The new pan is all bolted in place.

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The transmission is then mounted back up to the engine.

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The last thing left to do is to fix that dowel pin inside the timing gear case.
I'll probably start on that tomorrow.




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