Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Lawn & Garden Batteries Are Crap


  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#16 TUDOR OFFLINE  

TUDOR

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 915
  • 543 Thanks
  • 497 posts
  • Location: Sault Ste Marie, Ontario

Posted May 05, 2012 - 07:37 PM

Yes, you're 100% right. They are poor quality. They just don't last.
Deep cycle batteries are not meant to be used as starting batteries. They can't withstand
that shock load. They are meant to be slowly drained to half, an then slowly recharged.
They'll do the job, but won't last.


Will, the Nautilus deep cycle marine group 27 batteries last 10 - 11 years in my 1655, and sometimes sit for months without starting or using a charger, then lights off the engine with no problem. Kinda pricey at CTC, though. The last time I started the 1655 was in the winter, it had sat for 14 months with an 9 year old battery. The battery finally froze last winter after sitting another year without being recharged. At 10 years. I'm happy.
  • wvbuzzmaster and IamSherwood have said thanks

#17 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

johndeereelfman

    Elfin Majic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 3761
  • 5,479 Thanks
  • 2,535 posts
  • Location: Lititz, PA

Posted May 05, 2012 - 08:08 PM

Casey, I'll buy your 10 batteries if you'll buy my 25. LOL

I get my L & G tractor batteries at Advanced Auto. They usually put them on sale right around the middle of summer, and they usually have three different types to choose from, as far as cold cranking amps. I usually buy the 1200 cca battteries, and they run around $32.00 each. In most cases, the adverage life span is between 4-5 years for my batteries, but then again, I'm not using mine everyday, or as ofter as you guys are. When I put a tractor away, that I know won't be run again for some time, I disconnect the battery cables, as a way of keeping the terminals from corroding. I bought eight batteries last year, four in 2010, and plan on needing at least four this year.

What ever you do, make sure you don't sit them on a metal surface when being used or when not being used. The metal sucks the life right out of them. Maybe this is one of the reasons, why some of you guys aren't keeping a charged battery. Try putting a thick rubber pad between your mounting base and the bottom of you battery, and see if your batteries will last a little longer. I found this out from my Mechanic, after complaining to him, that I can't afford to keep buying batteries all of the time.

Edited by johndeereelfman, May 05, 2012 - 08:43 PM.

  • dstaggs, daytime dave, josh deaven and 2 others have said thanks

#18 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

wvbuzzmaster

    Squeaky Wheel

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1792
  • 4,492 Thanks
  • 7,341 posts
  • Location: West Virginia

Posted May 05, 2012 - 08:27 PM

Troy... the batteries sit directly on the chassis... which is metal. Guess I will be cutting some 1/4" plywood for in between.

#19 caseguy OFFLINE  

caseguy

    Connoisseur of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 906
  • 1,624 Thanks
  • 5,600 posts
  • Location: Edinburg, PA

Posted May 05, 2012 - 09:36 PM

I get my L & G tractor batteries at Advanced Auto. They usually put them on sale right around the middle of summer, and they usually have three different types to choose from, as far as cold cranking amps. I usually buy the 1200 cca batteries, and they run around $32.00 each...


The most CCA's I've ever seen in a L&G battery is 425. I'd like to find some at 1200!

What ever you do, make sure you don't sit them on a metal surface when being used or when not being used. The metal sucks the life right out of them...


Thanks for the info Troy! Concrete will do the same thing! Always sit them on a chunk of wood in the garage or your basement when you store them! This applies to rechargeable batteries for your drills etc... Something to think about.
  • wvbuzzmaster and johndeereelfman have said thanks

#20 bgkid2966 OFFLINE  

bgkid2966

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8254
  • 1,407 Thanks
  • 1,327 posts
  • Location: Aurora, Illinois

Posted May 05, 2012 - 09:37 PM

I run a deep cycle in my Cub. I have had it for 5 years now and have no problem with it. It is not used in the summer at all. Just in the winter for snow removal. The l&g batteries did not have the cca to crank the engine. The electric winch also draws a lot of juice raising the plow. Just my two cents.

Geno
  • wvbuzzmaster said thank you

#21 Cvans OFFLINE  

Cvans

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 5412
  • 4,477 Thanks
  • 5,009 posts
  • Location: Eastern SD.

Posted May 05, 2012 - 10:10 PM

This year I installed a gel cell in one of my tractors just to see how long it would last. The starter for my plane came with two inexpensive batteries and I only needed one so the other went into the CC129.

I'm not sure that the piece of wood under the battery is needed. This practice started years ago when battery cases were not plastic and they tended to leach voltage into anything that was grounded. Today's batteries with the plastic cases are insulated well enough that this is no longer a problem. Take a look at the battery racks the next time your in the store and you will see they are metal and more than likely provided by the manufacturers. Batteries set in these racks for months without discharging. Another thing about wood is that once wet it holds the moisture for long periods of time which will promote rusting of the metal tray the battery is setting on. Also the wood tends to compress over time relieving the tension from the battery hold down so the battery can start to shake and vibrate which is damaging to the battery.
Your thoughts would be appreciated.
  • IamSherwood said thank you

#22 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,254 Thanks
  • 28,603 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted May 06, 2012 - 07:14 AM

I picked up a couple of 425 ca batteries over the last few years. They're labeled Briggs and Stratton, but sold thru TSC. Seem to be good batteries. Only one we have had problems with was Ryan's, and it was a bad ground at the regulator. Not it's fault, operator not watching his gauges.
  • wvbuzzmaster said thank you

#23 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

IamSherwood

    Elf guardian

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2066
  • 8,379 Thanks
  • 7,696 posts
  • Location: Northern Ontario

Posted May 06, 2012 - 07:29 AM

Will, the Nautilus deep cycle marine group 27 batteries last 10 - 11 years in my 1655, and sometimes sit for months without starting or using a charger, then lights off the engine with no problem. Kinda pricey at CTC, though. The last time I started the 1655 was in the winter, it had sat for 14 months with an 9 year old battery. The battery finally froze last winter after sitting another year without being recharged. At 10 years. I'm happy.


We see Deep Cycle battery failure all the time, in boats, were people have used them as a starting battery. I guess
the lower amperage draw on a GT starter, compared to turning over a 6 or 8 cyl engine is the difference. That's great, that
you're getting that kind of life out of any battery. Any idea what a GT starter draws?
  • wvbuzzmaster said thank you

#24 TUDOR OFFLINE  

TUDOR

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 915
  • 543 Thanks
  • 497 posts
  • Location: Sault Ste Marie, Ontario

Posted May 06, 2012 - 09:27 AM

I'm not sure. I recall something about 60 - 100 amps, but I'm not positive.

I do know that this was the 2nd Nautilus since the car battery died about '88 or '89.

I also know that L&G batteries don't have the reserve to crank over small engines at -25 or -30*F. About 60% of my tractor hours are in the winter.
  • wvbuzzmaster and IamSherwood have said thanks

#25 maxedout OFFLINE  

maxedout
  • Member
  • Member No: 9548
  • 37 Thanks
  • 90 posts
  • Location: Hays, North Carolina

Posted May 06, 2012 - 12:17 PM

I use and laugh if you will but I use an ATV battery in my 210, 172, 2146 and I just switched my 214 over to run the same. About 40 bucks up at the Cycle shop but they last longer than the L&G batteries.

The thing is, the batteries, any batteries need to be charged at least once a month. During the Winter Months for tractors I do not use, I remove them and put them in the work shop on a wooden shelf. I use a trickle charger I picked up at flea market on each, got them plugged into a breaker bar and flip goes the switch each battery gets some juice.

Another note, the charging systems in tractors need to be in good shape, alternators need to be in good working order, battery connections kept clean and the cables need to be clean and good quality.

I've got two batteries right now that are over 5 years old, they had 3 month warranty's on them 5 years ago. They're not made to last but if you take care of your battery they will last enough to get that 2 years or 3 or better.

Almost forgot, a couple of the worse things you can do is leave a battery in a GT for the winter months without cranking the tractor every couple of weeks.

Old tale around here to is Never store a battery sitting on cement as it will kill a battery dead. Why I have no idea and it maybe just a myth but I am not taking the chance, I am too cheap!

Edited by maxedout, May 06, 2012 - 12:20 PM.

  • wvbuzzmaster said thank you

#26 olcowhand OFFLINE  

olcowhand

    Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Sponsor
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 20
  • 35,589 Thanks
  • 29,831 posts
  • Location: South Central Kentucky

Posted May 06, 2012 - 01:41 PM

As I understand, the idea that batteries drain if left sitting on concrete is no longer applicable. That was in the day of rubber cases & today's battery cases will not allow current to trickle through, no matter what they are sitting on. The only real thing to worry about now is keeping the top of the battery clean. A dirty battery top can hold moisture, which can cause a current drain between the battery posts. Below is a link to the subject at "Interstate Battery Corp."

http://www.thebatter...on_Concrete.htm
  • caseguy, Texas Deere and Horse, wvbuzzmaster and 5 others have said thanks

#27 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

wvbuzzmaster

    Squeaky Wheel

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1792
  • 4,492 Thanks
  • 7,341 posts
  • Location: West Virginia

Posted May 07, 2012 - 09:26 PM

I might start using ATV batteries, and quit leaving them on the tractors. Thanks all.

#28 TUDOR OFFLINE  

TUDOR

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 915
  • 543 Thanks
  • 497 posts
  • Location: Sault Ste Marie, Ontario

Posted May 07, 2012 - 09:36 PM

The thing is, the batteries, any batteries need to be charged at least once a month. During the Winter Months for tractors I do not use, I remove them and put them in the work shop on a wooden shelf. I use a trickle charger I picked up at flea market on each, got them plugged into a breaker bar and flip goes the switch each battery gets some juice.

Another note, the charging systems in tractors need to be in good shape, alternators need to be in good working order, battery connections kept clean and the cables need to be clean and good quality.

I've got two batteries right now that are over 5 years old, they had 3 month warranty's on them 5 years ago. They're not made to last but if you take care of your battery they will last enough to get that 2 years or 3 or better.

Almost forgot, a couple of the worse things you can do is leave a battery in a GT for the winter months without cranking the tractor every couple of weeks.

Old tale around here to is Never store a battery sitting on cement as it will kill a battery dead. Why I have no idea and it maybe just a myth but I am not taking the chance, I am too cheap!


I bought a Husqvarna YTH20 grasscutter in the summer of '06. The last it ran was pulling the trailer full of leaves last October before it was parked for the winter. Started it just 2 weeks ago for the first time since. That's over 6 months, and it started the same as it did all last summer. That's the original 6 year old battery which stayed in the tractor all winter without any charger or any exercising over the winter,

There is a reason why they are called storage batteries!

It's too bad the aftermarket L&G batteries aren't as well made. I've had enough duds that I now cram the largest auto or deep cycle battery into the tractor that I can make fit..

Edited by TUDOR, May 07, 2012 - 09:39 PM.


#29 caseguy OFFLINE  

caseguy

    Connoisseur of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 906
  • 1,624 Thanks
  • 5,600 posts
  • Location: Edinburg, PA

Posted May 07, 2012 - 09:40 PM

As I understand, the idea that batteries drain if left sitting on concrete is no longer applicable...Below is a link to the subject at "Interstate Battery Corp."

http://www.thebatter...on_Concrete.htm


Now that is some information that I can use! Thanks a million Dan! I like the fact that the article doesn't dismiss the theory out of hand, but gives the reasons why it was true at one time (and the old timers who taught it to us are not mentally feeble or superstitious) but that current technology has identified the reason and corrected it!

#30 Cvans OFFLINE  

Cvans

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 5412
  • 4,477 Thanks
  • 5,009 posts
  • Location: Eastern SD.

Posted May 07, 2012 - 09:42 PM

That's the original 6 year old battery which stayed in the tractor all winter without any charger or any exercising over the winter,


That is outstanding service out of a battery. Even if it died tomorrow you should be happy.
What is the brand name on the battery?




Top