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Caution, Work Safely Please.


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#1 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 04:15 PM

Please keep by standers away from machining equipment when your working unless they have the proper safety equipment on.
I was drilling a 15/64ths hole (just under a 1/4") through a 3/4" pin. The bit caught, broke, and and the photos below show the results. The door is 5' from the drill press. This is a double pane window and the inside pain is broken. The second photo is taken from the outside and you can see the drill press
through the window. The last photo shows the broken bit and the pin that I was drilling. The pin is not hardened and and was drilling easily. This happened so fast the I didn't feel the pin move nor did I hear the bit break. Just a pop when it hit the glass. When I took the wife out to see it 20 minutes later the glass was still breaking and you could see new cracks forming in the glass. An hour later the cracking had slowed quite a bit but the cracks were still forming.
Please be careful .

Attached Thumbnails

  • Broken window 001.JPG
  • Broken window 003.JPG
  • Broken window 002.JPG

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#2 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 04:33 PM

Thanks for posting this. Its always good to post these reminders. When I'm grinding, cutting or doing something like that I don't even in the garage.
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#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 05:00 PM

Safety reminders are always good. Even hearing protection (which we all tend to forget about).

Glad your OK, thanks for the reminder.
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#4 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 05:53 PM

Chris, glad you weren't hurt. Safety reminders are very good, I know for my self I constantly have to think about it or I will take a short cut which we all know could lead to something like this or worse.
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#5 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 05:59 PM

That's kinda scary Chris! I always wear safety goggles when drilling but I've never seen a drill bit fracture with that much force. I've seen that glass cracking happen before. It makes a sort of sizzling sound as the cracks break the glass into small and smaller pieces. At least it did on a patio door I had.

#6 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 06:06 PM

Yes, Thanks for the reminder! And please, all of you that are just starting out restoring old GT's. Take the time to learn the proper safety procedures for the process you are doing or the equipment you will be using! Just because you saw some Pro or expert on Youtube doing something unsafe doesn't mean it is the right way. I have been in Industrial Maintenance for over 20 years. Trust me I have seen many Pro's hurt and or killed because they did the job so many times and figured nothing bad would ever happen to them cause" I've done it a million times this way" Remember it only takes one mistake to change yours or your Family's life forever. I've done it myself so trust me on this one!
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#7 Kyocum OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 07:30 PM

Cvans I am glad all that was hurt was the window, which is replaceable. It looks to me like the pin was just sitting on top of the vise jaws as you were drilling and not clamped in the vise. I am glad you are allright.
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#8 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 07:42 PM

Yes, Thanks for the reminder! And please, all of you that are just starting out restoring old GT's. Take the time to learn the proper safety procedures for the process you are doing or the equipment you will be using! Just because you saw some Pro or expert on Youtube doing something unsafe doesn't mean it is the right way. I have been in Industrial Maintenance for over 20 years. Trust me I have seen many Pro's hurt and or killed because they did the job so many times and figured nothing bad would ever happen to them cause" I've done it a million times this way" Remember it only takes one mistake to change yours or your Family's life forever. I've done it myself so trust me on this one!


Very well said Chris. Thanks
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#9 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 07:50 PM

Thanks for the reminder, it always happens when least expected. From personal experience I know it is when you are doing normal ordinary things. Working in construction I have pulled nails out of hands, seen fingertips cut off, always with tools used every day.
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#10 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 08:04 PM

Thanks for the heads up Chris! You too Chris! This is a subject that surfaces periodically, especially when someone has a close call. I'm very glad that you weren't injured when the bit broke.
Chris M., you mentioned our hobby and the things that we do in the pursuit of it. As it relates to our hobby, one of the issues that can be overlooked is the fact that your tractor project could have originally been painted with Lead based paint. Proper safety precautions should be observed when removing paint that is suspect. It just popped into my head when I read this topic, and I wanted to share it.
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#11 Bud OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 08:12 PM

Glade no one was hurt. In addition to using safety quipment and protection, also for me I need to remember not to be in too big of a hurry, take your time and pay attention to the task at hand.
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#12 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 08:16 PM

Thanks for the heads up Chris! You too Chris! This is a subject that surfaces periodically, especially when someone has a close call. I'm very glad that you weren't injured when the bit broke.
Chris M., you mentioned our hobby and the things that we do in the pursuit of it. As it relates to our hobby, one of the issues that can be overlooked is the fact that your tractor project could have originally been painted with Lead based paint. Proper safety precautions should be observed when removing paint that is suspect. It just popped into my head when I read this topic, and I wanted to share it.

Another reason I love this site. I really like it that people will jump in and add other important things. That's a great point you raised! :thumbs:
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#13 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 09:04 PM

First of all, Thanks for your concerns. I as much as anyone needs to be reminded on occasion to slow down and think twice about what I'm about to do. I know when it comes to flying I always tell people that "if you haven't got time to do a good pre-flight, you haven't got time to fly". I should work harder to carry this over to everyday activities also.
JDBrian you are correct about the glass continuing to break. Later I was standing at the drill press again and I could hear this crinkling sound and walked over by the door and I could see more and more cracks showing up. My wife was just amazed that it kept going on and on. It was over an hour later before it stopped. I've opened and closed that door numerous times since and the glass is still in there. Doesn't seem to be layered safety glass. Feels spongy and I wish I could think of something to put over it to preserve it as reminder.
There has been some other good points brought up here and I hope it continues.

#14 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 09:15 PM

I had never, and would have never thought about lead based paint. Thanks for bringing that up, Steve.

Chris, you could get laminate and put it over the glass. I don't now how hard it is to take out the one pane but you could at least put it on one side. Lol.
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#15 lyall OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2012 - 10:40 PM

that is why I like using my old post drill. it only goes slow ( by hand) so no broken bit flying around and it can drill a hole in just about any metal I use.




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