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Parts Of A Plow


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#1 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 24, 2012 - 02:38 PM

Being that it is time for people do do garden work, there is a lot of plow talk and I can follow conversations very well when I have no idea what part is what. Does anybody have a diagram with the parts labled? Or if the parts aren't very hard to describe you can just name them and what they do. I looked on google and came up with no new knowledge.

#2 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted April 24, 2012 - 03:17 PM

Ryan, heres a good place to start http://www.brinly.com/PP_51BH.html. You can download the manual which has most of the part names. I think the blade, so to speak, is referred to as the share. I'm new to these terms as well. Heres a simple explanation of how one works. http://www.farm-dire...ghing/howp.html I have the urge to buy one even though I don't have any ground to turn over. It just seems like a really satisfying task.
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#3 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted April 24, 2012 - 03:43 PM

Ryan, here is one I found that has great detail. Hope it helps.

Plough_detail.jpg
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#4 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted April 24, 2012 - 03:58 PM

Here's another with added descriptions:

ribbing-plow.jpg

Here's another pic of a landslide. The green steel plate sitting on the ground, coming back from the plow point is the "landslide".

landslide.jpg

And a rolling wheel landslide is like in Dave's pic....the wheel on the rear. When there is a rolling landslide, there won't be a stationary landslide.
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#5 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 24, 2012 - 04:19 PM

Thanks guys! It seems like the parts I thought were one thing, are actually different parts. I will take a better look at the diagrams later when I have a chance.

#6 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2012 - 08:40 PM

I think that one of the reasons for confusion is that not everyone calls the parts the same thing. I have heard the "share" called a shear, a point, a shoe etc... Most of the other parts folks agree on though. The one part that I'd love to know where the name comes from is the frog. Can anyone answer that one?

#7 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2012 - 09:24 PM

I think that one of the reasons for confusion is that not everyone calls the parts the same thing. I have heard the "share" called a shear, a point, a shoe etc... Most of the other parts folks agree on though. The one part that I'd love to know where the name comes from is the frog. Can anyone answer that one?


I was wondering that too, I have heard many different names as well. The frog seems like the most confusing.

#8 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2012 - 09:29 PM

The one part that I'd love to know where the name comes from is the frog. Can anyone answer that one?


Maybe cause it goes "kneedeep"? LOL I have no idea where they got that name.

#9 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2012 - 09:58 PM

The one part that I'd love to know where the name comes from is the frog. Can anyone answer that one?


I cannot, but I can add that on excavator buckets that have replaceable teeth, the knob welded to the bucket that the tooth slips over and is pinned to is also referred to as a 'frog'. Seems to be recurring, a piece that holds the ground-engaging part of the implement.

#10 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2012 - 01:07 AM

it will be hard to get the names right as lots of places and regions call stuff by differnt things. Not even all plows are made up of the same parts. Some have solid mould boards, some have slatted one. There are differnt names for a longer or short bottom. You can also have a roller coulter, or a jointer, or a courter. All those parts do basiclly the same things, but are not the same type of parts.

As far as i know the frog is the part that attaches the share, mould board and landside to the main leg or beam of the bottom. It is ussally a V shaped part you cant see well behind the outer ones.

You can also have a tail wheel, furrow wheel, a land wheel or land wheels in two differnt places.

Then there are the types of plows, like 3pt, semi-mounted, fully mounted, land hitched, and ibelieve for a time there was an IH one that pivited in the middle.

In horse plows, you can get right or left, breaking, stubble, reversible, ditching and one with a huge bottom for cutting roots after clearing trees. but i cant think of the name for it.
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#11 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2012 - 07:39 AM

OK my take on this.

Ever see a horse being shoed? The bottom of the hoof, after you clean all the mud and dirt out, looks like a frog. When the shoe is attached the nails go through on an angle and holds the shoe in place. The shoe is basically the same thing as a cutting-wear edge, so when the steel plow was invented the same term was used, because the bolts went through on an angle, to hold the cutting edge on.

Edited by Amigatec, April 26, 2012 - 07:41 AM.

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#12 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2012 - 10:17 AM

I found that the explanation of how the plow cuts and turns over the sod was enlightening for me. I've never really thought about how one works. It makes a lot more sense to me now and I can see why the adjustment of the various parts is critical.

#13 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2012 - 11:16 AM

IThe one part that I'd love to know where the name comes from is the frog. Can anyone answer that one?


In hand planes the part that holes the plane blade on an angle is also called a frog. I wonder if any part holding a cutting edge on an angle should be called a frog?

#14 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2012 - 08:16 PM

Sorry Ryan. I seem to have :hijacked: your topic...I hope that all of the great information that the guys put up has answered your question(s).

Here is a more detailed explanation of the hows and whys of a moldboard plow. Click here. This probably more information than you'll ever need, but I found it incredibly interesting so I thought I'd pass it along.

When dealing with railways, when 2 tracks cross, the angled piece (shown below) is also called a frog...but where did the terminology come from? I've been looking for quite a while and it seems that the word was used to describe the part as we know it in the early 1600's when plows were first being made with Iron parts incorporated in the design...but no info on why it was called that. Just for reference, the frog can also be made of wood in some cases.

rail frog.jpg
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#15 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2012 - 08:48 PM

Don't worry weather the thread was hijacked or not, I didn't think that you hijacked it until you posted that, and I still don't. Thanks for the file, that's very ingesting and it has a lot of good information beyond the part names.




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