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Brinly, Agri-Fab Implements For Planting Food Plots & Pastures?


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#1 broken2 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 21, 2012 - 07:20 PM

My father and I have been plowing and discing plots for people, usually a couple times a year, we enjoy doing it. He has a Ford 8n and I have a Ford 2600. We each have dearborn 2 bottom plows and we have a 7ft dearborn disc. While we are able to prepare the ground, we don't have the knowledge or equipment necessary for planting. We currently have a request to plow, disc and plant 3 acres of orchard grass for Alpaca pasture. The research I have done on orchard grass mainly recommends two methods, one uses a grain drill (to expensive) and the other a broadcast spreader followed by a cultipacker. There has to be good seed to soil contact, preferably 1/4"-1/2" deep. My Father already has a Agri-fab 100 broadcast spreader http://www.agri-fab....ts/45-0215.aspx to tow behind a LT/GT and I have found a 4ft cultipacker I'm considering buying for $150. The cultipacker is in nasty shape but I think I can rebuild it if this method seems feasible. Another implement I'm considering is a 40" Aerator-Spreader (AS-40BH) http://www.brinly.com/AS_40BH.html Both of these implements seem to be light duty for home lawn use. Does anyone have any experience / advice with these or any other implement for a GT or the larger tractors that might get the job done. Keep in mind the soil will be plowed and disced before planting.

Here are some concerns that come to mind:

1. Will the implement be durable/reliable enough to do multiple acres?
2. Will the implement produce a consistent, controllable spread pattern?
3. Needs to be fairly low cost.
4. Can't be to bulky, space is limited on trailer.
5. I would like to be able to plant multiple crops for both pasture and game food plots.
6. Most important- has to produce good results, I don't want to waste anyone's time, money or seed.

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#2 Bud OFFLINE  

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Posted April 21, 2012 - 07:59 PM

I don't know the type of soil around your area but it is important to have a firm seed bed. I would lean towards the cultipacker over the aerator spreader.
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#3 broken2 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 21, 2012 - 08:16 PM

I don't know the type of soil around your area but it is important to have a firm seed bed. I would lean towards the cultipacker over the aerator spreader.


I forgot to add that I have a Agri-fab lawn roller to go behind the aerator-spreader. That's one reason I was considering it, so I wouldn't have to haul a heavy cultipacker. I could fill the roller when I get on site and empty it before loading it again.

#4 Bud OFFLINE  

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Posted April 21, 2012 - 08:25 PM

I think than I would try putting the aerator-spreader behind the roller. I don't know much about the aerator's.
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#5 broken2 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 21, 2012 - 08:50 PM

I only know what little I have read, but from what I understand cultipacking after broadcast spreading is so the ridges on the cultipacker "set in the seed" and compact the soil. My thought with the aerator-spreader is that the seed should fall into the holes left by the aerator so a flat roller would be sufficient to cover and compact after seeding. I really have no idea if this is plausible. If I can't be certain of the results I will simply pass on the job. I'm just curious and would like to be able to plant someday. Might have to wait until I can find the proper equipment- whatever it is.

#6 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted April 22, 2012 - 05:37 AM

You can't rent a drill ? When we did a few fields we cut for hay, that is just what we did.
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#7 broken2 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 22, 2012 - 11:03 AM

You can't rent a drill ? When we did a few fields we cut for hay, that is just what we did.


I never thought of that, I'll have to check into it.

#8 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2012 - 06:49 AM

Yeah, I'd really lean towards renting or borrowing a seed drill. Also, given the size of your tractors you might be able to find an old one in a bush somewhere and rebuild it, although I doubt that's feasible for your present project because finding/fabbing parts will take too much time.

I've used that very Agri-Fab broadcast spreader and it does a decent job, but to do 3 acres is going to take some time. If you do use it, or any broadcast machine, keep in mind that the seeds get thinner the closer they are to the edge of the spray pattern. That's easy to overcome with a bit of overlap, but you'll have to experiment a bit with speed and overlap to get an even application.
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#9 L.Fure OFFLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2016 - 11:11 AM

My father and I have been plowing and discing plots for people, usually a couple times a year, we enjoy doing it. He has a Ford 8n and I have a Ford 2600. We each have dearborn 2 bottom plows and we have a 7ft dearborn disc. While we are able to prepare the ground, we don't have the knowledge or equipment necessary for planting. We currently have a request to plow, disc and plant 3 acres of orchard grass for Alpaca pasture. The research I have done on orchard grass mainly recommends two methods, one uses a grain drill (to expensive) and the other a broadcast spreader followed by a cultipacker. There has to be good seed to soil contact, preferably 1/4"-1/2" deep. My Father already has a Agri-fab 100 broadcast spreader http://www.agri-fab....ts/45-0215.aspx to tow behind a LT/GT and I have found a 4ft cultipacker I'm considering buying for $150. The cultipacker is in nasty shape but I think I can rebuild it if this method seems feasible. Another implement I'm considering is a 40" Aerator-Spreader (AS-40BH) http://www.brinly.com/AS_40BH.html Both of these implements seem to be light duty for home lawn use. Does anyone have any experience / advice with these or any other implement for a GT or the larger tractors that might get the job done. Keep in mind the soil will be plowed and disced before planting.

Here are some concerns that come to mind:

1. Will the implement be durable/reliable enough to do multiple acres?
2. Will the implement produce a consistent, controllable spread pattern?
3. Needs to be fairly low cost.
4. Can't be to bulky, space is limited on trailer.
5. I would like to be able to plant multiple crops for both pasture and game food plots.
6. Most important- has to produce good results, I don't want to waste anyone's time, money or seed.

attachicon.gifDSC02400.JPGattachicon.gifDSC02429.JPG

 

I know this is an old post, but thought I would make a suggestion. Grass seed can be hand broadcast, or spread using a broadcast spreader. If you do this early in the spring a rain storm will most likely come along and water the seed into the soil. The seed could also lay on the ground until a rain does come. Some seed may get eaten by the birds, but you could spread it a little heavier if that is an issue.  I've done this in the past on a four acre plot of ground. Don't try spreading the seed on a windy day though. The seed is pretty light and will blow into areas you don't want it to.



#10 Delmar OFFLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2016 - 03:22 PM

I have used a chain link fence-drag to set grass seed before, and it worked good.  first used a broadcast seeder to plant, then went back over with the drag.  I have also used this method when planting my deer hunting food plots with clover, turnips, etc.  for breaking up the soil I have a tow behind 48" crank up/down  double disc.


Edited by Delmar, February 19, 2016 - 03:30 PM.


#11 Leonard VanCamp ONLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2016 - 06:31 PM

A lot of landscapers around me use Brillion Cultipacker/seeder set ups.

Edited by Leonard VanCamp, February 19, 2016 - 06:31 PM.





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