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Life On & Off My Farm - Life Changes


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#346 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 08:30 AM

Dan was this your second cut? Do you wrap them if stored outside?


Believe it or not, the 4th cutting! But the 2nd & 3rd were not much at all. Being Alfalfa is part of the mix, when it begins to bloom, you need to cut it whether a good stand or not. Even though we finally started getting good rains, we never expected to get 100 rolls out of this cutting, so we're pleasantly surprised!
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#347 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 09:46 AM

Thanks for the info I know just enough to be dangerous, here in northern New England we don't often get/do a 3rd cut, unless they are chopping haylage.

#348 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 10:18 AM

I just help a local farmer take off some of there 5th crop yesterday. 160 acres merged into 40 foot windrows with a Krone 650 and 4 Semis. Took about 7 hours. The hay started early this year so we were able to get 5 crops. 4 is a normal year. We cut about every 28 day up here for haylage.

#349 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 01:48 PM

Official roll bale count is 103! Just finished getting all the rolls in. About 40 acres of corn to shell, then the 2012 harvest will be over.

#350 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 01:49 PM

I just help a local farmer take off some of there 5th crop yesterday. 160 acres merged into 40 foot windrows with a Krone 650 and 4 Semis. Took about 7 hours. The hay started early this year so we were able to get 5 crops. 4 is a normal year. We cut about every 28 day up here for haylage.


Ducky....40' windrows?

#351 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 09:01 PM

Ducky....40' windrows?


That's right Daniel. They use a merger that picks up 20' of hay and brings it one way and than they run down the other side and put another 20' into that. The hay was cut with a Knone disk mower. It cuts about 30' in a pass.

#352 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2012 - 10:07 PM

That's right Daniel. They use a merger that picks up 20' of hay and brings it one way and than they run down the other side and put another 20' into that. The hay was cut with a Knone disk mower. It cuts about 30' in a pass.

Wow! Bet that's a very flat field.

#353 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 08:06 AM

We are fairly flat up here to gentle rolling. I believe he has about a 1000 acres of hay this year. That same farmer has 1700 acres of corn to chop this year that we will be starting in the next few days. That will make some long days for me. We run the equipment pretty much 24/7 when the corn is ready for the pits. Just hope it stays dry so we don't have haul to the road with dump carts. I'll get some pics of this when we start.
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#354 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 08:45 AM

When we were grinding the corn in Western Kansas, our short days were like 18 hours. Most times, you got off, ate supper/breakfast, got a shower, and maybe 3 hours sleep. Back at it at sunrise. This went on for nearly the whole month of September. Everyone was a bit on the short tempered side by the end!

#355 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 08:57 AM

Ya when that stuff is ready it is time to go and go long.

#356 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 09:00 AM

When we were grinding the corn in Western Kansas, our short days were like 18 hours. Most times, you got off, ate supper/breakfast, got a shower, and maybe 3 hours sleep. Back at it at sunrise. This went on for nearly the whole month of September. Everyone was a bit on the short tempered side by the end!


I'd just bet you were! Glad I don't have but a few days each year that long.
Ducky..,..how large was the windrow from 40' swath?

#357 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 10:05 AM

I'd just bet you were! Glad I don't have but a few days each year that long.
Ducky..,..how large was the windrow from 40' swath?


About 4 feet wide by a foot or a little better high. We were able to run about 6-7 MPH which is pretty good hay. They are mixing a grass, I forget the name, in with the alfalfa that really does well.

#358 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 03:14 PM

About 4 feet wide by a foot or a little better high. We were able to run about 6-7 MPH which is pretty good hay. They are mixing a grass, I forget the name, in with the alfalfa that really does well.


Down this way "Orchard Grass" is the common blend with Alfalfa.

#359 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 09:48 PM

Down this way "Orchard Grass" is the common blend with Alfalfa.


That may be it Daniel. I will check with them and get back.

#360 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2012 - 10:09 PM

Just took a ride this afternoon to find out where the 12" hose was coming from and it is about 10 -12 mile long and goes all the way back to Tidey View farms. They are one of the largest dairy operations "6500 head" in our area, next to the farm I work for. I will give you 3 guesses as to what's in that hose and the first two do not count. Tide View also has another dairy operation down in the Rosendale area where they are milking around 8000 head and expanding to 10,000 by next spring. You just can not imagine the size of their silage piles. When I traced the hose back to there farm I was amazed to see a corn silage pile that grow from nothing several days back to around 100' tall and growing. Right now it is a peak but when done the peak is usually about 100' long as well. Tonight there was a D7 Cat, 3 four wheel articulated John Deeres and several 2 wheel drive front assist on that pile and the feed was still coming in. There are 2 custom operator doing the chopping and between the 2 they are running 6 choppers.




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