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Life On & Off My Farm - Life Changes


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#3376 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 12:29 PM

Just got back from taking off the cull cows & picking up my steel I-beam.  Stopped for more nails & some truss reinforcement plates.  Trusses will be here end of next week.  Took 4 cows instead of just 3.  One has a bad foot, and she was laying down in the holding pen, plus she's never been much count...so off she goes.  I guess what upsets me the most is now that milk prices are at a price we can make money at, now we get this mastitis storm & only have 2/3 or less of the milk we would have had.  Guess I should look at it this way....never a better time for low production, as low prices coupled with low production would be a disaster.

  Trust me Al.....you're not alone!


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#3377 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 01:25 PM

Just got back from taking off the cull cows & picking up my steel I-beam.  Stopped for more nails & some truss reinforcement plates.  Trusses will be here end of next week.  Took 4 cows instead of just 3.  One has a bad foot, and she was laying down in the holding pen, plus she's never been much count...so off she goes.  I guess what upsets me the most is now that milk prices are at a price we can make money at, now we get this mastitis storm & only have 2/3 or less of the milk we would have had.  Guess I should look at it this way....never a better time for low production, as low prices coupled with low production would be a disaster.

  Trust me Al.....you're not alone!

That's why we pulled out of freezer beef, want to say just in time, both Patty Rose and April would not calf and the price of a breeder was sky hih, time and money was running out.

In time Daniel, it will bump up, it is good you are looking at the positive sides of things, remember the glass is always half full :D


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#3378 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 03:14 PM

fingers crossed.gif   Decent chance of rain Sunday night 50% and Monday 60%.  Dry as a bone here.....yard brown, corn twisted up.  Need rain BAD!


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#3379 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 04:53 PM

:wtf: the grass requires mowing 2 x a week from the rain here, we don't need any more, sending it your way.


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#3380 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 04:58 PM

:wtf: the grass requires mowing 2 x a week from the rain here, we don't need any more, sending it your way.

 

PLEASE DO!!!!   Haven't mowed in over a week, and hated to do it then.  Just tops to whack off here & there, and DUSTY!


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#3381 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 05:21 PM

Tonight when I finished milking, I got a sweet surprise when I removed the milk filter from the line.  Almost no mastitis at all!  In fact, the cleanest it's been in months!   Maybe we will see our somatic cell count start dropping finally!  It will take several days to know, as they are slow posting the numbers.  From what I seen (or didn't see) on the filter tonight, we may finally be getting somewhat of a "handle" on the mastitis.  I will still be selling more cows, but maybe not as many as I thought.  All depends on the samples & cultures the lab runs next week.   Now if I could just get some rain from the heavens!


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#3382 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 05:50 PM

Danil,

Up here potatoes and soy beans are the big crops.  The big farmers have 160 acre and larger fields and seem to be constantly irrigating.  Many have 10" and 12" wells for a single large field.  Is the corn crop profit too low to irrigate in Kentucky?


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#3383 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 05:59 PM

Glad you are getting a handle on that titty rot. Too bad you couldn't have gotten the rain we got yesterday.



#3384 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 06:01 PM

Danil,

Up here potatoes and soy beans are the big crops.  The big farmers have 160 acre and larger fields and seem to be constantly irrigating.  Many have 10" and 12" wells for a single large field.  Is the corn crop profit too low to irrigate in Kentucky?

 

No wells around these parts to support irrigation.  Unless one lives next to a river, then irrigation isn't an option here.


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#3385 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 06:42 PM

Glad things are easing a bit.Maybe you hauled off the main culprits for the mastitis!



#3386 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 07:34 PM

Glad things are easing a bit.Maybe you hauled off the main culprits for the mastitis!

 

ONE of them was for sure a large contributor.  And she gave a lot of milk still, so she was like 2 average cows with high counts.  Then another was a large contributor also, but she gave half what the other did.  It will help.


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#3387 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2014 - 07:35 PM

This has been a farm for over 200 years, i live in the third house that was built in this location.

 

You would figure being almost right on top of the mount wells would be deep, ours is only 70 feet, the stream is another few hundred feet below us, natural springs that never run dry seep from the east slope and fills the small swamp the farmers dug in the valley.

 

To the right of were i was trying to mow is the old buggy road that connected this farm to a settlement that is now Conway founded in the 1780's, the driveway that runs by the house is a part of the road and lead to the next farm on the other mount, the Culvers, then to the small town of Ashfield founded in the 1750's.

DSCF1269.JPG

 

About mid way looking down the field it curves to the right towards the swamp.

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Looking back, i am on the south slope.

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A part of the swamp on the left, very overgrown now.

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Ground is always wet here, swamp is below me to the right, this is one of the seepage springs on the north east slope.

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Another one of the springs.

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This mountain top and the one behind me and to the right of me was cleared after the civil war in the 1870's. my granfather bought the DT 680 Hesston, skidder wench and begain selective logging most of the trees picked were 150 years old, it has been 15 years since the last tree was cut.

DSCF1275.JPG

 

Looking towards Goshen which is around 12 miles, the farm is over the crest.

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There is a settlement that pre-dates all these towns in this area around 2 miles from me to the south west right above Peter's farm, his property butts right up to it on the peak of the mountain, Briar Hill Road leads to it from Williamsburg and is a dirt road that was a bypasses, the main town road is hard to find now but the north end is still there, leads to a small settlement straight down the center of around 12 celler holes on each side, each property is surrounded by high stone walls and is around 2 narrow acres with the properties streching down the mountain on both sides, root cellers are dug into the side of the mount not far from the celler holes, the east side towards Briar Hill Road  and the south side is gone, damaged by skidders and bull dozers from logging. The town is around 1/8 of a mile or less long spanning the crest of that mountain peak. The road that runs through my field to conway splits and lead to that town which is now a part of Williamsburg township.

The name was never known and no history was ever passed, after the British invaded Skinnerville which is now Williamsburg, it never was resettled.

 

This part of Ma is very old and parts of it still remains the same dating back to the early 1700's.

We are a blink of an eye, lots of water will come to you someday and the corn will grow strong.


Edited by trowel, July 11, 2014 - 07:40 PM.

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#3388 alleyyooper OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 07:14 AM

People near Saginaw are raising cane about the farmers drilling wells to irrigate the soy beans, sugar beets and wheat. their home wells are going dry and many new wells are in the 300' range very costly.

 

I have been mowing about every 3 to 4 days and then still have a lot of clippings on top when finished and I have the mower set at 3.750 inches too.

 

I also had a stroke of luck yesterday, See my squatters post.

 

My brother sent a E Mail and said he got 38 round bales off 25 acres of hay field. He lives south of Cadillac Mich. and has had a whole bunch of rain too.

 

:D   Al


Edited by alleyyooper, July 12, 2014 - 07:15 AM.

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#3389 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 09:42 AM

My well is 540 feet deep and has 490 feet of water in it. Pulling the well pump is an all day ordeal. A neighbor said they drilled this well for a week and hit nothing then when they hit water they hit it big time. 


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#3390 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2014 - 11:52 AM

My well is 540 feet deep and has 490 feet of water in it. Pulling the well pump is an all day ordeal. A neighbor said they drilled this well for a week and hit nothing then when they hit water they hit it big time. 

 

WOW, and I thought mine was deep at 160'! Not too hard to pull mine when it's a faulty foot valve, but when the twin lines are full, it's a beast!  Is yours a submersible Willie, or a deep well jet type like mine?  With your water table, I suspect yours is submersible....much easier to pull.


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