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Life On & Off My Farm - Life Changes


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#196 Tencubed OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2012 - 09:34 PM

Strange isn't it. You're happy the weather is predicted to cool down and give a bit of rain. Here we're happy to hear the weather is going to heat up into the mid to high 90's for the next week or more. It'll give the second cutting alfalfa an opportunity to grow well and take advantage of the moisture in the ground. The second cutting, not an every year thing around here, may surpass the first cutting this year. I've been on this place all my life, I'm 70 now, and have never seen this happen.

The hotter weather will also set the wheat which is starting to go from green to golden and get things ready for harvest.

Hope the rain shows up for you and the heat for us.

Mike
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#197 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2012 - 09:42 PM

Our 2nd cutting of Alfalfa out done the 1st. We sometimes get 5 cuttings, but this year 3 for sure (if rains come soon), and a possible 4th. I'm not so concerned about the alfalfa as I am the corn. I hope you get some warmer weather Mike!

#198 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2012 - 10:16 PM

...Where's that "hats off to you" smiley? ;)


Here you are sir...One hat's off smiley! hat's off smiley.jpg This goes for me too fellas!
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#199 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2012 - 09:27 AM

I bought a springer heifer about 3 months back. She looked at the time to be within 3 weeks or so of calving, due to the size & looks of the udder. Well, the weeks passed by & the udder kept getting bigger & bigger. She didn't calve till 4 days ago & her udder was so huge she couldn't stand on wet concrete, as her legs were spread so wide she would slide out. Had tio put her in the sick pen where it's nothing but sawdust on dirt. I've milked her some by hand, but this morning decided the udder swelling had receded enough that she might be able to make it in the parlor. I set extra gates up to direct her into the parlor from the front of the holding pen, & built a skinny alley that would force her straight into the one side of the parlor so she wouldn't have a larger area to start circling & acting nutty. It also kept her from walking a lot longer distance on wet/slick concrete. After sweating about a quart, I finally got her into the parlor & got her milked out good for the 1st time. She has mastitis, but I expected that & treated her for it, then put her back into her sawdust pen. Paid $1400 for her and sure hope she'll make it to the milking herd. So far, so good! :thumbs:

#200 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2012 - 11:14 AM

I actually like the smell of cow poo. As long as its fresh.


Some new neighbors were throwing a fit last year when the poo spreading began in earnest around here. They said they didn't know how anyone could stand the smell. I told them it was the smell of money in these parts. They haven't complained since.

#201 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2012 - 01:07 PM

Some new neighbors were throwing a fit last year when the poo spreading began in earnest around here. They said they didn't know how anyone could stand the smell. I told them it was the smell of money in these parts. They haven't complained since.


Dont you just love the people that move out to the country for that rural life, then complain about everything thats not like the metropolitan life style they left behind.

#202 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2012 - 07:25 PM

After milking tonight Teresa spotted a small heifer on the loose. Had to go round it up & noticed a dry cow down by itself. After I got the heifer in, I went to check on her thinking she was looking to calve tonight. I was a day late. In this heat it's easy to overlook things. She had the calf sometime yesterday & the calf was dead. Got her put in with the milking herd. She looks to be fine. Sure don't need to lose any cows, as we're down to an all time low number as it is. Have to hook up the trailer tomorrow to take a dud cow to market Tuesday morning.

#203 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2012 - 07:26 PM

Dont you just love the people that move out to the country for that rural life, then complain about everything thats not like the metropolitan life style they left behind.


Ought to be illegal! :mad2:

#204 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2012 - 08:49 AM

Getting ready to load a cull cow & the milking herd's breed bull. She is a crappy milker, and he's gone lame on a rear foot. I have a 3 more bulls of varied size, so I have another to take his place. But I have to fit him with a nose ring & 4' of chain before I'll trust him. They sure don't like me putting in the nose ring!!!!!!!! The ring alone won't stop them from coming after you, but if they get you down, grabbing the ring & pulling is like an emergency brake....they freeze. Adding the length of chain prevents them from chasing you down, as the chain will get around & under their feet, stopping them in their tracks.

#205 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2012 - 09:18 AM

I don't think I would be to happy if someone put a nose ring on me. :laughingteeth: I am married, hmmm!

When you put the nose ring in how do you keep them from charging you? Do you have a fenced shoot to put them in?

#206 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2012 - 11:12 AM

I don't think I would be to happy if someone put a nose ring on me. :laughingteeth: I am married, hmmm!

When you put the nose ring in how do you keep them from charging you? Do you have a fenced shoot to put them in?


We have automatic locking headgates in the feeders, plus I have a locking headgate in a chute where I trim their feet.
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#207 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2012 - 12:24 PM

... But I have to fit him with a nose ring & 4' of chain before I'll trust him.


Yeah, those Holstein bull are danged unpredictable.

Back in the days when you could make a living on a small 'family farm', my step-dad was milking 12-15 head of Holsteins, he always left his bull in the pasture with the cows. He would put a chain around the bull's neck with a length of chain that hung down to about a foot off the ground and had a piece of 2x4 on the end. The bull could walk, graze and and take care of his 'responsibilities', but if he tried to run, it would trip him. Worked great.
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#208 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2012 - 04:16 PM

Here is an update on our 2nd silage pit re-do. We've done gone & got our concrete ramp dirty! You can see how we also formed up to the end of the end blocks, so the plastic will lay down without being ripped on the corners. We may do the 1st pit like this sometime.

DSC00127.JPG

This is the dirt between the two pits. Dad & I brought dirt in with the payloader, but today I had to finish pushing it up to the top of the block wall with the MF 1855's FEL. It's handier than a pair of pliers, I'll tell ya that! Then I back dragged the center when I finished. We will be laying down thick plastic to cover this dirt completely. This will keep all rainwater from getting between/behind these 2 walls. The water will run down to the end & away. We built a berm at this end to prevent heavy rains from flooding into this area, as our farm druiveway becomes a river when it comes a gully washer. Yeah, I know...it never rains now, but we have to plan ahead! :smilewink:

DSC00126.JPG

Like I said in an earlier post, the new concrete floor will have to wait. You can see the patch in the far end we put in. This floor should hold up another year or two.
The 3rd pit is beyond this one. When/if we ever get to re-do it, we'll only go 4 blocks high instead of 5 like these we've done. It only gets haylage, and we don't need as much storage capacity for that.

DSC00128.JPG
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#209 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2012 - 04:52 PM

Dan, sorry the concrete got dirty. Can you power wash it and make it look new again? LOL Those pits haven't looked that good since ? Great job, like the 'tween part, should help a lot when the monsoons hit.

#210 JDGuy445 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2012 - 07:51 PM

Yeah, those Holstein bull are danged unpredictable.

Back in the days when you could make a living on a small 'family farm', my step-dad was milking 12-15 head of Holsteins, he always left his bull in the pasture with the cows. He would put a chain around the bull's neck with a length of chain that hung down to about a foot off the ground and had a piece of 2x4 on the end. The bull could walk, graze and and take care of his 'responsibilities', but if he tried to run, it would trip him. Worked great.

The Jersey bull we had on the farm was a wild one. Darn thing would charge the gate, the first one was wood and he demolished it to pieces. After that we had metal ones, he hated that even more. Eventually we would have to replace it again. :rolleyes:




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