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#61 DB1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2012 - 01:52 PM

I have never seen any Kinkades or early Standards at any shows that I have attended. I guess,I live a sheltered life.
It must be nice to have such a concentrated collection as yours Jdemaris. That way you get to see all of the progressional changes through the years.
Now, that is something to be cherished, indeed.

I'm always hopeful that I'll find a hidden treasure to reveal to the world. :bounce:

#62 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2012 - 03:49 PM

Jdemaris, Let me be the first to welcome you to the forum.


If i was paying attention which i was not so Welcome to GT Talk.
You do realize the rarity of these tractors ? you would have to judging by what you and have just announced a extensive collection of said tractors, your knowledge is welcomed and would be greatly benefited from and pictures of said tractors are a requirment.
This is not just a run of the mill tractor but of one of the first walk behinds ever made in the USA, a pronounced moment in walk behind GT history.
Or ?

#63 DB1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 29, 2012 - 06:48 PM

I've got a couple that look pretty much the same. I'd have to see a better photo. The first Standard tractors did NOT us Standard engines. They use a Kinkade engine built by American Farm Machinery Company of one-wheel tractor fame (engine in wheel). I've got many Kinkades, early Standard tractors, Walsh, Monarchs, Standard Twins and Viking Twins. Spiiked metal wheels, flat-lug-cleat metal wheels, rubber tired, wood handled and metal handled.



Hi Jdemaris,

My catalog never even mentioned the Kinkade engine or the American Farm Machinery Company as an earilier tractor. I'm a novice to the Standard line of garden tractors. So, thanks for the clarification. The picture I have is the best quality I can do with my photoshop program. It is difficult to make out the details because of the original size of the image.

Thanks for your contribution,
DB1

#64 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2012 - 10:53 AM

Candy, since you can't download the whole manual I posted the other day, I'll at least tease you with a centerfold. This is the tractor that started this whole thread. Notice how the engine has a smooth flywheel. Up in the front is a squirrel cage fan friction driving off the rim for cooling. This is the same engine that was used in the second generation Kinkaid.


earlystandard..jpg
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#65 DB1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2012 - 11:36 AM

Wow, that is really a different looking engine. The illustration does the engine justice.
Thanks for digging that one out Doug.
Candy

#66 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2012 - 06:36 AM

DougT, Candy, regarding the cooling fan, is that a cast aluminum or iron housing with a rotor much like you would an exhaust-driven turbo compressor and is the buzz-coil liken that to one used on the Ford Model T or Fairbanks Morse Hit~n~Miss ?

Edited by trowel, March 31, 2012 - 06:37 AM.


#67 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2012 - 08:17 AM

I just wanted to say thanks to all of the contributors of this thread. I'm not the biggest walk behind fan, but I do understand their importance in the progression to what I do collect! There is some invaluable information in this thread and some very useful discussion as well! Thanks again and please keep it going!
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#68 DB1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2012 - 02:55 PM

DougT, Candy, regarding the cooling fan, is that a cast aluminum or iron housing with a rotor much like you would an exhaust-driven turbo compressor and is the buzz-coil liken that to one used on the Ford Model T or Fairbanks Morse Hit~n~Miss ?


The Walsh has the Sirocco type of fan that forces the air around the fins on the head and cylinder for cooling.
The fan shroud on our "Monarch" is made of tin.
The Walsh coil box has a timer and dry cells with postive gear drive.
Magneto can be added without change to the engine.

When I take the pictures, I'll make sure to take pictures of the buzz box.
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#69 DB1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2012 - 05:07 PM

"Monarch"

This Monarch has a Hercules 6 volt dry cell battery and the coil in the box.
A Zenith carb. and a Tilloston bowl cover.
It uses an Auto-Lite F-11 sparkplug.
Each steel wheel had 24 pyramid lugs with steel wheel extensions.
Wooden handles with green paint.
There was no tag was on this unit.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Buzz1.jpg
  • DSC03461.jpg


#70 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2012 - 05:27 PM

Candy, the tag on the Monarch would have been on the inside of the handle. The serial number is also stamped in the front of the oil fill plug.
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#71 DB1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2012 - 05:31 PM

I just wanted to give Jesse the information he requested first before the big introduction.
Our flywheel on the Monarch is cast iron or steel but not aluminum with short cooling fins on it. The motor turns, but we have never ran it.

Here is the Monarch...TaDa!
Barn Fresh!

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  • DSC03525.jpg


#72 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2012 - 05:42 PM

There is an owner's manual for the Monarch here:

http://gardentractor...andard-monarch/

There is an oil pump in the crankcase that pumps oil up into a trough to feed the rod bearing and splash lube. If the oil pump doesn't work, no lube! The oil pump is the big bolt headed thing on the bottom of the crankcase. It can be removed and cleaned without dissassembling the engine.
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#73 DB1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2012 - 05:45 PM

Candy, the tag on the Monarch would have been on the inside of the handle. The serial number is also stamped in the front of the oil fill plug.


Thanks Doug we found it. 46257
The only other number was a number 20 by the bolt the bolt that holds the cylinder head down.

#74 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted April 02, 2012 - 11:28 AM

"Monarch"
A Zenith carb. and a Tilloston bowl cover.


Candy, this statement is a little confusing. Can you take some pictures of the carb and maybe get some numbers from it? Congrats on findng the serial number but unfortunately there isn't a verified way to tell the build dates from the early numbering system. The 20 around the jug is interesting. I'm wondering if it means the jug is 20 thousandths oversize?

#75 Lauber1 ONLINE  

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Posted April 02, 2012 - 11:57 AM

I just wanted to say thanks to all of the contributors of this thread. I'm not the biggest walk behind fan, but I do understand their importance in the progression to what I do collect! There is some invaluable information in this thread and some very useful discussion as well! Thanks again and please keep it going!


Well you could be a walk behind fan, i beleive we still have a few openings left.

Many people fail to understand the impact of the walkers. Early models , although crude, gave the commerical and market garden people the same type of power that the large farms had. Tractors like the Sears Handiman, and the Standard Twins werent built to work in the back yard, but in fields up to several acres. There are many other models out there, like Utilitor, Shaws, Beemans, that are back bone of GT's today. Sadly most of them get little notice, as everyone wants to ride.




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