Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo

55 Gal Electrolysis Tank


  • Please log in to reply
41 replies to this topic

#16 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,269 Thanks
  • 28,606 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted March 16, 2012 - 08:20 PM

What do you put in the water & how much? Grnd to the part being cleaned & hot to the rods in the water at what amperage? I'm going to build one of these just want to get it right. Thanks guys, great info.


Member Olcowhand put together a very nice article on the topic, It can be reviewed HERE
  • metalwiz and larryd have said thanks

#17 Masseyman OFFLINE  

Masseyman
  • Member
  • Member No: 8947
  • 4 Thanks
  • 16 posts

Posted March 16, 2012 - 10:50 PM

Thanks, I had seen it but didn't remember where. Very good & informative.
  • larryd said thank you

#18 Amigatec OFFLINE  

Amigatec

    Collector of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5899
  • 2,023 Thanks
  • 3,172 posts
  • Location: Haskell Oklahoma

Posted March 17, 2012 - 09:48 AM

I just filled it to the top with water and added a whole of washing soda. My charger is a 6 amp, it's putting a full charge now.

  • larryd said thank you

#19 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted March 17, 2012 - 12:57 PM

Keeping the anodes clean seems to help. I used 1/8" x 1/2" stock to make my anodes. I have 4 in the barrel and since they were 4ft. long I bent them at right angles so they overlapped in the centre of the bottom of the barrel and bolted them together. This keeps the anodes out against the wall of the barrel allowing more room for the workpiece. I hang the stuff to be de rusted from a 2x4 that is across the top. I bolt the workpiece to a ring terminal on the end of some 10g wire that connects to a bolt on top of the 2x4. I then just connect the clamp from the charger to the bolt. I have different lengths of wire to hang large and small items so they are suspended and don't touch bottom. I thought the anodes on the bottom would give better coverage and they do but tend to get covered with paint and rust very quickly.
I think this year I'll try larger anodes and not have them along the bottom. That way you can rest large items on the bottom. It would be a better idea to add an anode near the top of the barrel after your workpiece was submerged. I'm working on a better power supply as well to get a little more voltage applied and amps flowing to speed things up.
  • larryd said thank you

#20 redcarkids OFFLINE  

redcarkids

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7555
  • 242 Thanks
  • 464 posts
  • Location: warren indiana

Posted March 17, 2012 - 04:24 PM

Keeping the anodes clean seems to help. I used 1/8" x 1/2" stock to make my anodes. I have 4 in the barrel and since they were 4ft. long I bent them at right angles so they overlapped in the centre of the bottom of the barrel and bolted them together. This keeps the anodes out against the wall of the barrel allowing more room for the workpiece. I hang the stuff to be de rusted from a 2x4 that is across the top. I bolt the workpiece to a ring terminal on the end of some 10g wire that connects to a bolt on top of the 2x4. I then just connect the clamp from the charger to the bolt. I have different lengths of wire to hang large and small items so they are suspended and don't touch bottom. I thought the anodes on the bottom would give better coverage and they do but tend to get covered with paint and rust very quickly.
I think this year I'll try larger anodes and not have them along the bottom. That way you can rest large items on the bottom. It would be a better idea to add an anode near the top of the barrel after your workpiece was submerged. I'm working on a better power supply as well to get a little more voltage applied and amps flowing to speed things up.

What is the lenght of time for say a hood or a deck to get them rust free? Are we talking weeks? or days? or hours?
  • larryd said thank you

#21 redcarkids OFFLINE  

redcarkids

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7555
  • 242 Thanks
  • 464 posts
  • Location: warren indiana

Posted March 17, 2012 - 04:26 PM

This is what we used for our electrolysis tank but we did learn one thing. It needs more anodes and I want to use flat bar stock next time for easier clean up. Let me see if I have the pics:

Ill ask you also NUTNDUN How long to clean a hood like the one in the photo and can you add more than 1 item to the barrel?

#22 Amigatec OFFLINE  

Amigatec

    Collector of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5899
  • 2,023 Thanks
  • 3,172 posts
  • Location: Haskell Oklahoma

Posted March 17, 2012 - 05:19 PM

I have several items in the tank at the same time, as far as how long, as long as it takes.. Sometimes a couple of hours, sometimes over night.

Edited by Amigatec, March 17, 2012 - 06:56 PM.

  • larryd said thank you

#23 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted March 17, 2012 - 05:31 PM

I think 24hours is the standard time that most people allow. If you leave it in longer it doesn't seem to hurt anything. The quality of the results depends a lot on the shape of what you are working on. It is line of sight so if the anode cannot see the rust on the inside surface of a hood for instance then it won't remove that rust. You may have to move things around to assure good coverage. Try it, it's cheap and easy and can be a big help if you don't have access to sand blasting gear.
  • larryd said thank you

#24 sacsr OFFLINE  

sacsr

    Bush Hog Addict

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 4776
  • 3,268 Thanks
  • 3,283 posts
  • Location: Eastern NC

Posted June 28, 2012 - 07:34 AM

I was thinking about trying to use metal strapping as the annode.....that way .....it would be a throwaway and not have to clean them each time....anybody tried this??
  • larryd said thank you

#25 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

NUTNDUN

    Lost in Cyber Space

  • Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 3
  • 10,266 Thanks
  • 15,618 posts
  • Location: Pennsylvania

Posted June 28, 2012 - 08:14 AM

I was thinking about trying to use metal strapping as the annode.....that way .....it would be a throwaway and not have to clean them each time....anybody tried this??


I don't see why it wouldn't work as long as it doesn't have a coating on it. I know some metal strapping has that black coating almost like a gun bluing on it. The wider and flatter the better.
  • larryd said thank you

#26 olcowhand ONLINE  

olcowhand

    Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Sponsor
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 20
  • 35,603 Thanks
  • 29,833 posts
  • Location: South Central Kentucky

Posted June 28, 2012 - 01:18 PM

I've had large items come out great in 24hrs, then had to leave some large items 2 to 3 days. On larger items, being it is line of sight, I like to either move anodes, or reposition the part every 12hrs or so to ensure reaching all areas of the part.
  • Texas Deere and Horse and larryd have said thanks

#27 sacsr OFFLINE  

sacsr

    Bush Hog Addict

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 4776
  • 3,268 Thanks
  • 3,283 posts
  • Location: Eastern NC

Posted June 29, 2012 - 06:34 AM

Just a fyi.....when I first started using electrolysis I used rebar in my tank......but it was a pain to clean up and took forever .....I went to the scrap yard yesterday and picked up flat 8" by 2-3ft steel sheets.......just ran my tank for about 12 hours........when I pulled the sheets out to clean them......took me less than about 1 minute to clean each sheet..........no wire brush...just a quick scrap and then rinsed it off......this is the only way to go. I too am using wire to connect my annodes (currently have vise grips holding the wire to the annodes)......will go purchase more tonight since I have a rather large tank I am using and need a few more annodes working. So like others have said after they have used rebar or other smaller surface metal,.....use as large sheets as you can....much easier to work with......just got to make sure no contact with the object you are cleaning..
  • KennyP, HDWildBill and larryd have said thanks

#28 MFGray OFFLINE  

MFGray

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 154
  • 129 Thanks
  • 122 posts
  • Location: Cambridge, Ontario

Posted July 20, 2012 - 07:58 PM

Almost any piece of scrap steel will do as an anode, although some people have reservations about stainless steel, but they seem more hypothetical than proven. I have used old rusty baking trays, barbeque grills, garden forks, rebar - almost anything can go into the tank and get eaten up. The higher the current, the more aggressively rust is converted to black ferric iron, but the current will drop rapidly once the anode gets covered in deposits and I think that regular cleaning of the anodes is probably more important than the amperage that the system will initially draw. Archaeologists prefer to use the process at lower currents with less bubbles since these bubbles can cause some pitting on fine artifacts but I guess that doesn't matter for what we are doing
  • olcowhand, metalwiz, JDBrian and 1 other said thanks

#29 whst400 OFFLINE  

whst400
  • Member
  • Member No: 10929
  • 25 Thanks
  • 29 posts
  • Location: Crestwood, Ky

Posted November 06, 2012 - 01:16 AM

This process is far less "line of sight" than it is "electricity follows the path of least resistance. Once all the rust is removed from the parts of the wrok piece closest to the anodes it WILL continue to remove rust from the next closest areas and so on until ALL the rust, even that "hidden from sight" is gone. The reason it appears to only work line of sight is that the water/sodium carbonte solution is a semi conductor. That means the more distance the current has to travel between work pice and anode the less current will make that journey and the less rust will be removed. There comes a point when that distance is greater than the current can travel and the electrical connection is effectively lost, meaning the process stop.
I've seen a lot of posts about adding more anodes and jacking up input currents to speed things up. Remember that the solution is a semi conductor. Placing the anodes as close as possible to the work piece will get more of the input current to flow between the work piece and the anode, resulting in a faster process. Just don't get them so close they touch and short out! I normally use an old, Shauer 10 amp battery charger and can get current flows of 8-9 amps with a cup of swimming pool PH increaser (pure sodium carbonate) per 40 gallons of water using flat sheet steel scraps for anodes.
Another thing. The caution against using stainless is NOT an unproven opinion. Using it in this way releases hexavalent chromaium/chromiate that is considered a VERY hazardous material. The EPA requires it to be disposed of as a hazardous material (Tyvek suits, respirators and all) that cannot just be dumped.
  • metalwiz, sacsr, Amigatec and 3 others have said thanks

#30 Titus OFFLINE  

Titus

    Bush Hog Hoarder

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4216
  • 1,728 Thanks
  • 2,245 posts
  • Location: Coventry RI

Posted November 06, 2012 - 07:41 AM

Great thread with info, following this one, as I've been wanting to do this too.




Top