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#1 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 11:31 AM

Yesterday Brad and myself when to Wisconsin Tractor Parts which with All State tractor Parts here in the Midwest.
We where looking for a planter unit of a 7000 series JD or a Kinze Planter unit. Everything is still frozen so I priced a complete unit that would need a lot of work because they have been laying out side for so long. This option prove to be over my budget I could get a complete ready to plant Cat 1 3 Point 2 row Allis Chalmers 98 air planter for about double what they wanted for a single unit that would require a lot of work. But we did find a serviceable corn finger unit complete and a soybeans, edible beans, sorghum, cotton, and sunflowers unit for a decent price.
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So I figured we could build it cheaper with the seed units.

We want to build a 3 point cat 0 planter unit. out of the finger unit for corn, peas and pumpkins and plan to make it convertible to the bean unit for some other seeds.

Have a few other jobs to get out of the way and I will update when we get started. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. If anybody has some insite as to what the bean unit my be good for please chime in? They are not common around here.
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#2 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 01:12 PM

Maybe you should have looked for a 71 or 33 unit as the 7000's needs a transmission to run right. The first two where deere answer to the vegetable planter and they are ground driven. There was a plateless ground drive call #80 but there not common. When i did truck crops i built my own 5400 series white air unit, as it was ground drive, just needed 12V for the fan and would mount on any 2" sq tool bar. We planted acorn squash bythe acre, and could change over to corn in 10mins on the two row 3 pt unit. all you really needed was the seed disc and to calulate the spacing and set the gearing speed.
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#3 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 01:23 PM

Will be watching this one for sure!! I've been thinking on this, but like Lauber1 said I've pretty much only considered the JD 71 adaption.

#4 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 02:10 PM

Lauber1
There was nothing l like a 71 or 33 in the yard. Vege planters are not common around here. I understand I will have to provide a drive system. Thought of having a packer wheel drive. If I can find another serviceable finger setup and cut some off I will be covered for pumpkins as well. Besides corn that is the other main crop right know. I am finding to many cracked corn kennels with IH plate planter is the reason I am looking for a new planter option. I bench tested the finger unit and it seems to handle the sweet corn very well.
Thanks.
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#5 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 02:37 PM

yes the 7000 seies will plant sweet corn real well. I made a two row out of a 1240 planter once. Those were the early plateless unit before the 7000. The draw back there is again you need a transmission to drive the seed rate. What you need is one that ground drive off the press wheel. Might see if they have any 7200 series as i beleive some of those used a ground drive.
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#6 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 04:05 PM

This is going to be a very interesting topic with a lot of information for me to learn as I know nothing about planters but I would love to have or build one at one point or another. Thanks for the great topic.

#7 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 04:36 PM

I am going to be following this thread.

#8 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 04:38 PM

yes the 7000 seies will plant sweet corn real well. I made a two row out of a 1240 planter once. Those were the early plateless unit before the 7000. The draw back there is again you need a transmission to drive the seed rate. What you need is one that ground drive off the press wheel. Might see if they have any 7200 series as i beleive some of those used a ground drive.


I was hoping to find just what you suggested but the only press wheel drive was an older white air planter which was in really sorry shape. I will be looking at both a press drive and a separate drive wheel setup. I am kind of leaning toward a couple of drive wheels that will follow the tractor tracks and drive when the 3 point is lowered. I will have to put together a drive system with multiple sprocket to vary planting rates with this setup. They wanted nearly $400 for a bare planter unit and I can build one myself for much less. I should be able to get this done for less than that.

#9 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 04:39 PM

This is going to be a very interesting topic with a lot of information for me to learn as I know nothing about planters but I would love to have or build one at one point or another. Thanks for the great topic.

I am going to be following this thread.


I will do my best to make this as informative as possible.

#10 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 09:52 PM

I tried putting all of that into Google translate...all that came back was "??? I don't know either!" :bigrofl: I will be paying attention too Ducky and I'm gonna just get the apology out of the way right now for all the stupid questions I'm likely to ask! Thanks for starting this thread!

#11 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 10:03 PM

I tried putting all of that into Google translate...all that came back was "??? I don't know either!" :bigrofl: I will be paying attention too Ducky and I'm gonna just get the apology out of the way right now for all the stupid questions I'm likely to ask! Thanks for starting this thread!


Steve ask away. This has been on my mind for a while now and seed is getting so expensive that you need to get every seed into the ground and grow.

#12 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 10:07 PM

Have you looked at Cole Corn planters 12 Multiflex. ? http://www.google.co...DYqs-FDZpkaJ-nw
The market garden i worked at used one with very good results, very durable units but requires a grunt or two from the tractor to pull it.

Edited by trowel, March 07, 2012 - 10:08 PM.

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#13 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 10:14 PM

Thanks and Yes Jesse, all this stuff is very pricey for what it is. I am in the set that I can build better and howler at me if I go off track.

Regards...........Ducky

#14 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 11:52 PM

On the East coast we see many of those Planet Jr. drill seeders and the Cole Corn planters with the market gardeners abound, could have one for a few hunderd dollers or spend the next year slowly collecting all the parts from older units untill a rebuilt one is ready, i do that with my Planet Jr.s.
Would you like to me to ask around ?
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#15 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2012 - 02:42 AM

Steve ask away. This has been on my mind for a while now and seed is getting so expensive that you need to get every seed into the ground and grow.


This is excatly the trouble i fought for yrs, you only have one shot at a perfect stand. By the time you relized you hada placement problem it was over and you looked at how to correct it next yr.

Buying a seeder is a special thing and is all about what you want to seed, as not many units do all grains well. The Planet jrs are the kings of planting drilled rows of peas and beans. nobody has ever done it bigger, better or faster. You can get there unit just like the orginal ones new for around $500 a row. Corn is where most machine fall flat on there butt. It take a careful handling of the seed not to crack, chip or scuff the seed coat and make it worthless. You have to have the perfect delivery system, the right depth and the excatly the right covering and pressure over the seed, and it has to be able to be adjusted quickly for the differnt ground conditions. In corn planting the best units out there are John Deere and IH ones in the plateless type. If you want to use plates then you could go with an older AC ground drive(i think it was a model 68). Stay away from the 290, 490 JD ones as there werent all that good new and are now about worn out. I went with the 5400 White air unit because it was easy to get parts for(back then), it used a combo of a plastic plate and air to hold the seed to the plate, it was ground driven, and you could drive any speed and still plant the same rate. I knew of a guy once that mounted one to the back of a bolens walker and used it to fill in skips left by his bigger machine. Another nice thing about the White air was it used roller chains and you could make up whatever tooth sprocket you want just by going to the hardware place and getting a hub and weld a teeth wheel to it. They had an excellant manual that told you excatly what the spacing would be drive to driven and it was to two sprockets. When I planted squash, we needed to be at 2' spacings, so i took clear silicon and filled every other hole in the plate, let it dry, then shaved it down with a razor blade, and it was perfect down to the inch. We managed to grow 33,000 lbs of acorns on 3 acres, because the planter put the seed in the ground just right the first time. If you go with an older plate unit you will have to find graded seed thats all flats and rounds and sized properly to fit the plates. I dont know that any companys sell it that way now as everyone uses an air or plateless unit.

In the garden now i use a 3pt Sears/DB seeder. It works pretty well for corn and not really much else. At one time i had one of everystyle DB seeder produced, walking, walk-behind, and 3pt. They came with 7 plates of 12 holes and one with 2 holes and a chart to tell you the spacing of the seed at the drive and driven sprockets. Never use it with the fert attachment as it will lift the unit for the ground if you hit a harder spot and stop planting. I have a pair of the 3pt ones, each differnt, one with the fert only and the other to seed with. I have about 20 other types of seeders here also that i play around with to seed small stuff like radishes and spinch. I even have one that almost all made of wood.

If your going to ground drive with a trailing wheel, you should just have one in the center between the rows so if you drive a little crooked like i do it wont try to make the units run faster on one side to keep up with the other. I'll be interested in seeing what you decide to use and if your shocked at what the ending cost per row is. A modern plateless or air one is about 3 grand a row.
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