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1967 Bolens 1050 Tra-10D Rebuild


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#1 jmcdona OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 10:28 AM

In the process of preparing to do a refresh on my trusty TRA-10D I stumbled onto this forum. Seems like a great site with lots of knowlegeble folks.

I have a 1967 1050 / TRA-10d that is starting to burn oil/ smoke a bit. I use it to blow snow in the winter, and cut grass and occasionally rototill in the summer, - so it's my workhorse. The engine has never been rebuilt. It still runs strong, starts consistantly, etc.. - but it's starting to burn oil. I plan on replacing rings at a minimum. I contacted a well established Bolens parts dealer, and they told me that rings should be all that is needed. The piston does not have movement in the cylinder.

The cylinder is smooth to the touch, but I do see some visible scratching. But I cannot feel the scratch with my finger. My questions are:

- Can I just cleanup the cylinder, put a new set of rings in, and get back to work?

- Or is it recommended to replace more parts while I have it apart?

- Given the cylinder photos, should I have it bored .030, etc.. Or can I get away with a honing and new ring set?

Any info is greatly appreciated?

Thanks,
John

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#2 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 10:48 AM

jmcdona,welcome to the forum.Glad to have you with us.

If you can not feel the scratches,then I would run cylinder hone through it and put a good cross-hatch pattern on it.

#3 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 11:52 AM

If it were mine (but I'm cheap lol). I'd give it a hone & see how it looks then. More depends on how much ring groove you have at the top once the ridge is clean of carbon.

#4 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 12:16 PM

If it were mine (but I'm cheap lol). I'd give it a hone & see how it looks then. More depends on how much ring groove you have at the top once the ridge is clean of carbon.


:ditto:

These wisconsins are extremely durable and in most cases a simple Honing and a new set of rings will usually do the trick.
Most of the engines that I have, only required a set of rings, Lapping the valves and replacing a couple valve guides.
If your ring gap is within the specs you should be good to go.

#5 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 01:13 PM

Those Wisconsin engines were great, and well worth the time & expense to repair or rebuild.

As has already been mentioned, a slight hone & new rings will probably be sufficient, but you'll know much more once the engine is disassembled.

Using one of those "brush" hones will probably be enough to deglaze the cylinder walls without removing too much material. ....If you can't feel any of the scratches with a fingernail, you will be OK.

As Brian mentioned, valve guides may be worn, as that is another contributor to burning oil. ....His suggestion to check the ring end-gap is valid.

Once the piston is out, check the piston for signs of scoring or galling. ....Scratches (recesses) in the piston skirt should not be a problem, but "high spots" should be polished off.

Exhaust valves on Wisconsin engines were also prone to burning. .....Once the valves are cleaned, you can get an indication of if they can be reused or need refacing or replacement. .....Wisconsin valves are quite expensive, so if you can get them refaced, you may save some money.

If the valves are refaced or the valve guides are replaced, the valve seats may need to be re-ground to ensure concentricity and proper valve seating.

When you open the crankcase, be careful not to lose the ball bearing and spring which is in the end of the camshaft. ....While reassembling the engine, a slight dab of grease will hold the ball in the crankcase cover (spring goes in the camshaft) to aid assembly.

As long as you will be opening the engine to change the rings, check the bearing surfaces of the connecting rod and crankshaft. ....Wisconsin rods were an aluminum alloy, so wear would occur on the rod before wearing the crankshaft. ....Plastigauge (from most auto parts stores) can be used to check rod-to-crank clearance for wear.

I also suggest replacing the front and rear crankshaft oil seals while you have things apart.
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#6 jmcdona OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2012 - 07:21 AM

Thanks for the info and great tips.

It seems that it would be best if I replace the valve guides too while I'm at it. The valves and seat surfaces "look" okay. Should I have them lapped? Or do they typically keep their integrity?

Thanks,
John

#7 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2012 - 07:52 AM

Yes,I would definitely lap the valves.

#8 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2012 - 09:48 AM

Yes,I would definitely lap the valves.


Most definitely as Maynard said. Feel those valve stems closely, and if you can feel a ridge line where wear begins on them, then you should replace the valves as well as the guides.

#9 jmcdona OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2012 - 10:44 AM

UPDATE:

I eneded up boring it .010, replacing piston, rings, turning crank down .020, replacing rod with .020 under, recutting valves/ seats, and replacing valve guides. The cost is MUCH more than I originally anticipated, but I'll be happy in the end.

I'm doing the assembly now and I have a quick question regarding crank/ cam timing marks. I just want to make sure that the crank timing mark is what I think it is. There is a "bevel" between two teeth, as seen in the pic. Is this the timing mark, or am I missing it? I just want to be sure.

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#10 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2012 - 03:54 PM

It will be well worth what you put into it as you cant buy anything better than a Wisconsin engine IMO.

You are correct with the timing mark.
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#11 jmcdona OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2012 - 04:23 PM

Thank you Sir

It will be well worth what you put into it as you cant buy anything better than a Wisconsin engine IMO.

You are correct with the timing mark.






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