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#1 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 07:37 PM

Ok, time to start thinking about painting. With Spring right around the corner, and the temperatures starting to rise, we are all getting the itch to start painting all the parts that we have been stripping, filling, and priming over the Winter months. I know there are some new guys out there, that may have never painted before, and are looking for ideas, as to what kind of paint to buy, should they use automotive type paint or spray cans, how many coats are applied, and just what is wet sanding?

I know there will be numerous ideas, recommendations, solutions and techniques, but please remember, that every individual giving these methods, are different and these methods are what works best for them. For you first timers, try some of the methods, experiment different ways, and eventually you'll find which one works for you, or maybe even find one that hasn't been shared.

I know I'm not perfect, and I'll be the first to admit that. Some of my ways and methods aren't acceptable by some, but for others, they are very helpful. I just ask that, with each method or recommendation that is submitted, that others don't be judgemental, or criticizing. This is not intended to show right from wrong, but simply to find useful ways and techniques, that others can learn from. I think this will be a very useful thread, and many people have been looking for these type of answers for a long time, so with that said, let's get started, and post away!
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After all of the primed parts have been fully cured, I like to go over them one last time with a piece of brown paper bag, like you get at the grocery store. It isn't rough enough to remove the paint, but yet it's enough to smooth out the texture. After I'm done with the paper bag sanding, I wipe all parts down with a little rubbing alcohol, to make sure all dust is removed. I paint all my parts with standard John Deere spray cans, so I make sure my paint is fully mixed by shaking them for at least a minute and a half, minimum.

Before I do any outside painting, the first thing I do, is spray some Listerine Mouth Wash around the area I'm painting. The Listerine helps with bug control, as bugs don't like the smell, especially nats, so less chance of bug legs getting on the parts.

First coat is alway a light coat, just enough to let a little primer show through, constantly moving and never stopping in one place too long. Always start spraying off the part being painted, work your way across the part, and finish spraying off the part on the other side. Don't start or finish spraying on a part, as this will cause build up and possible runs. Always finish a part that was started, as even just the slightest little cure, will show overspray, if you have to go back and finish an unfinished area. I like to wait at least a day before applying the second coat.

When applying the second coat, which will be heavier than the first, I like to stand next to the part, on the opposite side of the sun (facing the sun). This allows me to use the suns reflection, so that I can see just how much paint is being applied. While applying this coat, I like to apply as much paint as needed, in order to see my reflection. Again, finish each part, and be constantly moving.

I allow the second coat to cure for at least three days. After the third day, I wet each individual part down, and start wet sanding them with 800 grit sandpaper. After sanding, rinse each part, and wipe down with a lint free towel or other material of preference. Let the parts dry at least over night, before applying another coat.

I'll apply another two coats, letting them cure at least a day between coats, and then follow up again with wet sanding, this time with 1100 grit sandpaper. Another coat of paint will be applied a day after the wet sanding, and this time, I will let cure for a week before wet sanding the last time. After cured, I give a final wet sanding using 1600 grit sandpaper. I'll apply one last coat of paint, and put the parts away to cure for a week.

Undercarriage parts, interior dash tower parts, and other parts that won't be seen, will be assembled to the tractor, usual after a week of curing. Visable parts, like the dash tower, motor sheet metal, hood, fenders, top of frame, and other miscellaneous parts, will only get assembled after at least two to three weeks of cure time, but not before getting one coat of Maguires Deep Shine wax, where decals won't be apllied. Decals will get applied after the tractor is completely assembled, and then I'll apply three more coats of wax.

When the tractor is completely assembled, and all the finished items are installed, I will then go back and grease all my fittings, and lube what is needed.

For my wheels, I prime the rims, and then mount the tires. After the tires are all aired up, and show no signs of leakage, I'll let the air out, and start taping off the tires. I tape the complete tire, so that there is no chance of overspray getting on them. I use the same procedures on the rims as I do on the tractors parts, including wet sanding and wax.

That's some of my methods, and I hope you guys will share some of your's. Remember, all methods are just techniques that we use, and should not be judged as right or wrong!

Edited by johndeereelfman, April 09, 2012 - 08:41 PM.

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#2 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 07:51 PM

Thanks for the tips and tricks Troy! The one suggestion that I would give in addition to what you have is to read the label on the paint you plan to use. This will provide invaluable information regarding flash time, re-coat intervals, and compatible primer and top coat suggestions. It will also provide proper safety precautions to be followed which should never be overlooked.
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#3 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 08:08 PM

Thanks for a great write up Troy! I know this will help numerous people, myself included!
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#4 bgkid2966 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 08:14 PM

I am glad you posted this! I have never taken on a painting project. Now, I just might!
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#5 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 11:11 PM

I have access to some good equipment, but this year for grins I'd like to try this ...

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#6 ckjakline OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 03:27 PM

The paint that i have been using on the ones that i restored so far are from the dealership. I use rustoleum auto primer/filler.That stuff is great.I also buy spray cans of the paint color i need,and usually i buy a quart can also.I havn't had to get any colors mixed yet.

I use alot of the same techniques that Troy uses.I also use spray cans and also spray gun to paint my tractors.First after primer has set up i go over the hard to reach spots(mostly on the frame)with the spray cans.next i'll go over it with the spray gun.Usually at least 2 coats.Next i give it a coat of clear.The areas that are out in the open i wet sand after clear.After cleaning frame and allowing to dry i shoot it with another coat of clear.polish and waxing to follow.

Another technique that i found works very well for spraying vinyl seats.Everybody might get a laugh out of this but i started doing this on vinyl car seats when i worked in an automotive detail shop.I call it finger painting.the seats were worn and cracked but not torn yet.I would spray seat with dye and alot of times it would run,even if you barly sprayed it.I take my finger and rub the excess paint in the cracks of the seat that i'm dying.Let that dry and spray over it with a second coat while it's still tacky.The second coat doesn't run and looks like a professional job.Funny thing is that a coworker that has been doing that profession for 20 + years laughed about it,and turns out they started doing this method and we both got a thumbs up on the nice dye jobs we were doing.
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#7 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 06:20 PM

Jim,

Thanks for sharing the video. I've never seen a finish come out looking like that from a roller applications. I'm very impressed! Sure would help stop overspray on larger pieces. I may just have to give this idea a whirl.

Craig,

The paint you use for your seats, is it standard paint, like you use on your tractors, or is it speciallly made for painting vinyl? How well does it hold up, while sitting on the seats, or while sitting in the hot sun at tractor shows? I'd like to find out more, if you're willing to share.

Edited by johndeereelfman, April 09, 2012 - 08:46 PM.

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#8 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 06:31 PM

The paint you use for your seats, is it standard paint, like you use on your tractors, or is specailly made for painting vinyl? How well does it hold up, while sitting on the seats, or while sitting in the hot sun at tractor shows? I'd like to find out more, if you're willing to share.


I don't know about different colored seats, but there's a product called "Back to black" by "Mothers" that works pretty good on vinyl seats. I used it on one of mine that had a lot of oxidation and sun bleaching. It looks pretty good now. Of course I don't have any pics... :wallbanging: :wallbanging: :wallbanging:
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#9 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 07:36 PM

Thank you, Now I know why my paint jobs are no good. LOL
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#10 Trent Thomson OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 08:02 PM

I don't know about different colored seats, but there's a product called "Back to black" by "Mothers" that works pretty good on vinyl seats. I used it on one of mine that had a lot of oxidation and sun bleaching. It looks pretty good now. Of course I don't have any pics... :wallbanging: :wallbanging: :wallbanging:

You can get it in some colors. My father used it on an old Harley Davidson golf cart seat he fixed up. Painted it white 2 years ago and it looks like it was done yesterday. Not sure where he got it or the brand, but it amazed me
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#11 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 08:21 PM

Jim,

Thanks for sharing the video. I've never seen a finish come out looking like from a roller applications. I'm very impressed! Sure would help stop overspray on larger pieces. I may just have to give this idea a whirl.

Craig,

The paint you use for your seats, is it standard paint, like you use on your tractors, or is it speciallly made for painting vinyl? How well does it hold up, while sitting on the seats, or while sitting in the hot sun at tractor shows? I'd like to find out more, if you're willing to share
.


there are vinyl paints, you can get them through auto suppliers. I've not used it yet, there is also a vinyl repair kit that is available through eastwood and they have an almost identical blue to the ford blue and that is what I am going to give a whirl. I was told that the vinyl paint is good though...so you may want to give that a go.

The mothers back to black and there is another called 'forever black' both automotive products made to restore vinyl trim back to the original color...black of course. As well miller tire sells a 'tire black' that you may want to try...

I would paint the wheels before you remount the tires that way you can get the lip real well and it won't stand out as such... And they look great when you do it that way...Plus I alwys coat the inside of the wheels with POR15 to resolve any corrosion issues and gives the tube something nice to ride on...just an Idea...
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#12 Billygoat OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 08:21 PM

Never thought about "brown bag" de-glossing but seems like a neat idea. Something I do different is use R-M Pre Kleeno instead of alcohol, and I also use tack rags. I have used vinyl spray in the past with great success. It's been a long while but I think it was Dupli-Color vinyl spray. If mixing paint for spraying, follow the manufacturer's directions no matter what else the "expert" down the street says. I'm a firm believer that the guys that made the stuff know more about what works with it than the rest of us. Just my opinion on that though. Take extra effort on prepping, because no matter how well it's sprayed poor prep will eventually rear it's ugly head.
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#13 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 10:35 PM



Tractor Pictures 137.JPG Tractor Pictures 138.JPG Tractor Pictures 140.JPG Tractor Pictures 143.JPG

 

Here is one of my spray painted tractors, that I restored for a guy about two years ago. It's a 1984 John Deere 212, and it was basically brought to me in pieces. The gentlemans grandson inherited the tractor from his other grandfather, who died two weeks later. As a momento to his deceased grandfather, the grandson wanted to restore this tractor himself, but after taking the tractor apart, he quickly lost interest, and gave up. So the other grandfather brought it to me to restore, and wanted to present the finished tractor to the grandson, without the grandson knowing, at an area tractor show. It took about four and a half months to complete, but we made the tractor show deadline by three days.

Some guys say you can't get a nice finish out of spray painting from rattle cans, or by rolling the paint on, but between the pictures I have attached above, and the video that Jim provided, just goes to show, that you can get just as good of finish, as you can from any of the best spraying equipment and high dollar automotive paint. The main thing is, taking your time, being patient, and knowing that anything can be fixed if you make a mistake.


Edited by johndeereelfman, March 08, 2013 - 05:04 PM.

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#14 ckjakline OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2012 - 06:11 PM

Jim,



Craig,

The paint you use for your seats, is it standard paint, like you use on your tractors, or is it speciallly made for painting vinyl? How well does it hold up, while sitting on the seats, or while sitting in the hot sun at tractor shows? I'd like to find out more, if you're willing to share.


Troy ,
The paints that we used were specialty plastic and vinyl automotive spray cans.The brand was Sem.It comes in around 50 colors(give or take).I used a lot of this paint to paint automotive bumpers,fender flares and interior seats vinyl and cloth,carpet if it was stained,rubber floor mats.(alot of jeep cherokees )that had faded and we wanted to make them good as new.As far as seats holding up i'm not sure they got sold at auction at the end of the week.I know the paint held up pretty well on my floor mats in my old truck.I would think it held up for a fair amount of time depending on use.
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#15 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2012 - 06:38 PM

Great write ups and tips.

Anybody got any tips for having the patience to do a good paint job? I just dont have it yet.
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