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#31 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 07:12 PM

I no longer have a blacksmith shop, left it behind and sold off the handmade coal forge with the side draft flue.
While working on the fuel tank bracket i snaped some pictures of the pan forge and the American Eagle Anvil, the blower bracket was cut off and is currently being used along with the squirrel cage blower for heat on my uncle's wood stove.
I need to make a trip to the farm were the extra hand forged tools are stored.

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#32 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 11:21 PM

My 2nd forge i made from 2 milk cans, cast steel firepot from a 6 inch break drum lined with silica sand/fireclay mix, portable type with wheels for fairs and small jobs.

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Edited by trowel, March 07, 2012 - 11:32 PM.


#33 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2012 - 08:10 PM

Trowels,
First off before even thinking of hammering and tempering steel the grade has to be known, the blade of the trowel with the welded shank is HHS (high speed steel) or commonly known as tool steel, different from the carbon steel it can with stand high temp with out losing it's temper and can be sharpened repeatedly with a file when temper is drawn to bronze, very hard and wears well but soft enough to take a good hard file.
The shank or Tang as it called with these types of tools is of 1045 grade tool steel, it is my favoret grade of steel to use for around any high heat source along with 1060 grade, http://www.google.co...OBxMxVcGSHIEluA
http://www.google.co...iYWZ78XFq1xA9jg
When tempered to bronze the steel is sprung to a point befor it bends instead of snaping, in a digging tool flexing is very importaint but like any tool when used improperly it will bend or break.
Now to put the metal to the metal, first start with a two blanks cut out of tin or sheet steel, the first blank has to be cut out 3/4 of the blade size, the reason behind that is when the edges are tapor forged the steel is drawn out to second finished blade size, then the curl is hammered in at the tip. Cut out the blank blade from the saw blade with a angle grinder or plasma cutter and clean up the edges with a grinder, it helps to cut out several blades at once. Then cut out the shanks or tangs out of one inch 1045 bar stock 4 inches long. I always start with the blades first and hammer out the edges leaving the center thick, forged steel is very hard and strong so hammer the bar into something of 3/4 inch by 1 3/4 bar and hammer one end around the wider side of the bar to the top of the bar turning it into a trangle, if the end was simply flattened it would be a weak point and break off, draw out the other end (tang) into a square tapor around 3 inches long (handle is 4 1/4 inch long) then using a scroll bender bend into a swans neck shape.
Now to the other side of tool making,
Clamp the shank and blade into a jig and weld/braze together, fire up the tempering oven (doubles as propane forge) and heat to a low cherry red, dip into hydraulic oil, (hydraulic oil cools a little slower then water resulting in a tough metal but still sprung) then compleatly clean the tool with a twisted wire brush and then it's back to the tempering oven.
Tempering steel takes away the hardness, too hard and it will not be able to take the stresses of a digging tooland break, it is not a knife.
A common method most tool maker do is to case harden the tool by ''baking'' the tool at 400 to 600 degrees for a certain amout of time, usally an hour, i prefer to temper all my tools because im using 2 different grades of steel.
The shank is already ready but now to run the colors on the blade much like a knife, it's back to the tempering oven and holding on to the shank the blade is passed in and out of the oven wating for the colors to run, once it begains it will start at the thinest part of the blade and quickly begain to run to the center, carfully twisting the tool so the edges receive a even heat, bronze is the color im looking for and once it starts do not put the blade back into the oven or the edge will run to purple which is soft for this grade of steel, i will allow the bronze up to the welds around the shank which is now becoming case hardened. typically the very edge will purple but grinding carfully with an angle grinder with a flap disk and finishing with a file takes care of it.
Now for the handles,
I like to hand pick Hickory or Maple 4 1/4 inch or 6 inch file handles from a reputable company with the 2 inch long ferrule for strenght, (it cost too much for me to lathe a handle and fab a ferrule, but i have done a few customs) center the handle blank on a handle jig, check for straightness and drill out with a drill press starting with a small bit 3/4 of the way into the handle, i use the depth gauge on the drill press and have it marked for 3 steps, the tang is slightly tapored but not to a point or it will split the handle like a nail, the second bit is a little bigger and is a 1/4 of an inch above the first bit which has to match the end of the tang, then the final bit is 1/2 of an inch above the first. I would throw out some bit sizes but each tang is a hair different and i match the depth and bit to the tang for a snug fit. Then the handle is driven onto the tang (tang wipped with light coat of boiled linseed oil to keep from rusting) with a rubber face hammer keepig the grains of the wood perpendicular to the blade were it will be at it's strongest, the tang is marked to the depth of the bored hole as so not to split the handle, after the the handle is snug then it's back to the drill press to drill out a hole through the ferrule, handle, tang and a rivet hammered in and peened over, then it's to final sand and stain the handle and wipe the tool down with boiled linseed oil and set up to dry, then using a paper bag dampened in boiled linseed oil sand the handel untill a nice sheen is achieved.
Your done !, now go dig up some bulbs or till over a flower pot.

I hope this has helped, any questions please ask.

Edited by trowel, March 08, 2012 - 08:22 PM.


#34 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 08:34 AM

Good Morning,
Here's some pictures of my hand forged tool,
Some of my very first Tongs from the first forge (now in the 2nd forge),
A large tong,
Poker and shovel for the 2 nd forge (milk can forge)

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#35 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 08:38 AM

Here's some pictures of my Drifts, Handle is of Maple wood, shank of 1045 steel, tool head of Rail Road spikes.
One for round holes, one for square holes and one for Plow Bolt holes.

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#36 bgkid2966 ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 08:51 AM

Thank you very much for sharing your knowledge. Your talent is awesome.

Geno
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#37 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 09:07 AM

Wow,those look great. You sure did a nice job making those.
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#38 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 09:09 AM

Thanks for the pictures! Is that an old wheelbarrow pan? That ws a well written tutorial.
I have been a member of I Forge Iron.com for several years. I don't post much since I've never set up a forge, but it's such an interesting subject I log in and try to learn as much as I can.

Edited by JD DANNELS, March 09, 2012 - 09:12 AM.

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#39 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 12:16 PM

I agree with the others, stunning hand tools!
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#40 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 12:48 PM

Trowel you are a true craftsman.
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#41 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 04:40 PM

Thanks for the pictures! Is that an old wheelbarrow pan? That ws a well written tutorial.
I have been a member of I Forge Iron.com for several years. I don't post much since I've never set up a forge, but it's such an interesting subject I log in and try to learn as much as I can.


Yes, it is a old wheel borrow pan, perfet for what i needed to set the fire pot into.
Thanks so much for the coments guys, i still have many more pictures coming and to dig out all the tools.

I still check in with the forging and metal casting fourms along with the fab'in and machining fourms to stay up on the current, thanks for reminding me about I Forge Iron.com, have not checking in a while.

Edited by trowel, March 09, 2012 - 04:43 PM.


#42 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 06:25 PM

My Peter Wright Anvil and a 3 prong pitch fork i never finished, it is bent in such a way so i can forge it on the anvil without the prongs in the way.

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#43 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 06:29 PM

Some prototypes of garden hand tools and some bolt punches and more drifts.
The small claw hammer was hand forged by a blacksmith in Ohio and given to me.

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Edited by trowel, March 09, 2012 - 06:30 PM.

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#44 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 06:40 PM

Now for the S-grade steel,
A slitter and a Fuller, also shown is the start of a large axe eye slitter and a Flatter, all from S-7 grade jackhammer bits.

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#45 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 06:44 PM

Trowel, very nice work and write up. You shouldnt be suprised by the intrest in your toolsmithing here at GTT, we all prefer the older ways and equipment. People that are capable of taking raw stock and turning it into useful and unique items are always welcome to show and share here. Most of us would like to do some of those things and we may try to when life lets up. So please post away. I, for one, am glad you have decided to share your knowledge with us.

Thank you.
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