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#16 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2012 - 06:49 PM

Cool stuff, trowel. Thanks for sharing with us.
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#17 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2012 - 06:59 PM

Stuff like this is always a good read....and welcomed! I've only seen one blacksmith in-person at a pioneer village. It was VERY mind grabbing!
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#18 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2012 - 07:18 PM

Nice tools you've made there trowel. Do i dare ask if you had training from a blacksmith or self taught. Many yrs. ago when i was young i was lucky to work for a old blacksmith in my home town. Learned alot from that old boy. :thumbs:
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#19 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2012 - 11:43 PM

Most if not all blacksmiths you see at fairs and engine shows are ornamental, hooks, nails, odds and ends, im a tool maker, the proper terminology is Toolsmith but everyone called it the general name ''blacksmith''.
my first forging was at 8 years old using my mother's oil funace for heat and a Sears SS12 rear weight as an anvil (oil bill was high lol), been forging off and on for years, mainly tools and parts for GT tractors and farm equipment, trade school during my teen years was for Metal fab and welding, also studied foundry and metal casting work, my father is a retired machinist, my grandfather a farmer, my older brother studied Auto mechanics, now into alternative energy, my younger brother is currently studing Machining at the Smith and Wesson collage in West Springfield to be a gunsmith, he also spent his teen years studing maching at a trade school, i have several friends that are welder, fabricators, GT and engine collectors and as Jeff Lauber knows, my uncle is a small engine/GT and LT mechanic.
I apprenticed under a very kind Mennonite by the name of J.R. for a year, he rebuilt and modified walk behind plows, sulky plows, shod horses and forged shoes, i was fortunate to watch and learn how to re-share a plow point, work on 1800's and 1900's horse drawn equipment and hone my skills on tool making.
Im not a expert, there are plenty of Blacksmiths that are ten times better then me and live and breathe this and im not as good as JDcrawler who's craftsmanship is mind blowing.
Like i said earlier, i use to do this, there is no money in it in this state, Coal is very high and low in quality, can't forge weld with it, scrap yards won't sell steel to me, just to china, the new steel is extremely high per lb and everyone just wants wall hangers, im a toolsmith, not a trinketsmith.
Let me see what else i have laying around.

Edited by trowel, March 03, 2012 - 11:47 PM.

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#20 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 05:12 AM

Hey ,those are pretty neat.Nice job on them.
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#21 tractorman604 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 08:55 AM

Who knew under the name "trowel" that you would have all that talent.I'm envious of guy's like you trowel,you really have the gift when it comes to your hands.....AWESOME!! :smiley-score010:

Edited by pchili4, March 04, 2012 - 08:55 AM.

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#22 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 09:10 AM

Apprenticing under someone who uses the trade daily is better than any trade school education IMHO! There's a lot of knowledge and skill that will pass away from disuse when the next several generations take the helm. It does my heart good to know that some younger folks take an interest in the crafts of old and are willing to keep the skill alive! We'd love to see what you've got Jesse!
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#23 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 03:08 PM

Impressive background you have trowel as well as your whole family. As caseguy said, its a pity that most of the younger generation are not interested in the old ways. Any chance i'v had to teach younger people welding, mechanical or fabrication i have done it with sure joy just to be able to pass it on. I bet when your whole family gets together you all have plenty to talk about. :thumbs:
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#24 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 11:47 PM

I have to confess i was not expecting such an intrest in this subject seeing as this is a GT fourm, this is just a touch of what i have tried, someday i will get into the metal casting side, and horse drawn tools. I have been very busy with the retail store working mad hours including a double shift on Sun, worked all morning unloading a 53 feet trailer all lose load of products all this morning, slept most of the afternoon and is getting ready for the 3am shift tommorow stocking shelfs.
I come from a mechanically inclined working class family with ties to the machine shops and casting shops surrounding Bethlehem Steel Co. with Farm Estates here in Ma, Al, Ga, Nc and Ky. Was working Middle class before the Reagan and Bush Amin. beat us down with their wars, and got a lot of my family members killed.
As an example my grandmother helped her father (my great granfather ''Daddy Doctor'') rebuild and restore antique cars and truck and a few Stanley steam cars, Ford model Ts, As, Bs, TT trucks, Fordson tractors, Chevy Deluxes, etc.., she also built and raced stock cars on dirt track in the south with her cousins, someday i will finish what she and Grampa started, a 1918 Ford Model T Touring.
The last of the great Nicholls, uncle Bill we buried last summer held 6 patent for numerous things. He joined the Navy after my Grandfather Joined the army and both served in the Forgotten war.
When i get more time i will upload more pictures explaining the procedure.
Sorry for rambling.

#25 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2012 - 12:02 AM

Will be waiting for your next posts. Randy.
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#26 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2012 - 12:04 AM

Great Work. I have played with it for years but I'm not very good compared to you're work. Most of what I do is Horse drawn wagon tongues and single trees. Today the coal is soft and gas is to high to play. Have made fireplace sets with the handles to look like longhorn heads.
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#27 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2012 - 12:11 AM

I have'nt been around any coal in yrs. What does a ton of coal cost a guy these days if you can find it?

#28 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2012 - 12:26 AM

In Ma it's $30 doller per 50 lb of good anthracite nut coal from Ky, forty 50 lb bags in one ton,....30 x 40 = $1,200 per ton.

I load the bags with a shovel from a gravity fed coal bin, i won't even touch the junk coal from retail stores, clinkers up the tuyere within 20 min of touch off.

#29 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2012 - 01:09 AM

Wow!!!! Had no idea it was that high per ton. I live in a small town here which has a hugh coal dome that can handle 2 - 100 + car coal trains per week that get trucked down 30 miles to Iowa State University. Thats alot of bucks.

#30 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 11:00 AM

This is one of my hidden interests. I got the wanna but never have gotten to it. Since I moved onto the acreage I have even omre reason to set up a small blacksmith shop. . It is a lost art and we will never know the secrets that have been lost and forgotten.
There are a few who keep it alive.
I am very impressed with you work Trowel. Pictures of your blacksmithing shop woulld be very much apreciated.

Fabman, I have a friend who dabbles in blacksmithing and he gets his coal from a supplier in Ames. He showed me a reciept and the price was $35 for 50 lbs and he usually buys 3 bags at a time..

Edited by JD DANNELS, March 07, 2012 - 11:03 AM.

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