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Advice On Adding Fluid


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#16 tinner OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 11:39 PM

I'm with some of the others here, I put tubes in my tires before filling with water to protect the wheels. When I contacted Rim Guard they told me they didn't have a dealer this far south because the weather wasn't cold enough. That's fine with me, I don't like cold unless it's in a 12oz. can. I also have some tires filled with some kind of run flat stuff.

#17 robby1276 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2012 - 06:56 AM

I spoke to guy last night who said he uses used motor oil in his. Don't think I want to go that route I'm not a environmentalist but I do believe in trying to do my part and could see that as being a issue if I got a hole in the tire On the other hand I guess it would prevent rust on the rims. However I wouldn't think it would be good for the tires themselves I would think it may cause the the tires to break down over time

#18 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 07:56 AM

Not sure what motor oil would do to the tires, but a largish leak would certainly damage any soil you were working in and you sure don't want it finding its way into your water supply. Given the purposes GTs get used for, I'd say that motor oil would be a poor choice.

I know it's expensive, but the best tire filler has got to be foam. Heavy, doesn't leak out, and protects you from nail and screw holes.

#19 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 08:09 AM

You could also go with wheel weights. One thing to note is that if you need to handle the wheels during maintenance a 26/12x12 would weigh 150+ lbs. I use easily removable wheel weights on my 2320 because I can handle the 70lb wheels but with fluid they would be close to 250 which means it's a 2 man job.

#20 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 09:00 AM

You could also go with wheel weights. One thing to note is that if you need to handle the wheels during maintenance a 26/12x12 would weigh 150+ lbs. I use easily removable wheel weights on my 2320 because I can handle the 70lb wheels but with fluid they would be close to 250 which means it's a 2 man job.


See, that's when you go buy another tractor with a loader and pallet forks so you do maintenance on your existing tractor. It's the ultimate excuse. "Sorry, honey, but I needed a tractor to fix this tractor so I could do that project you wanted done."
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#21 OldBuzzard OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2012 - 09:11 AM

... I know it's expensive, but the best tire filler has got to be foam. Heavy, doesn't leak out, and protects you from nail and screw holes.


Foam filled tires do have their advantages, but here is one HUGE disadvantage. They don't flex. That means that unless you have a REALLY good seat with it's own suspension, a GT with foam filled tires would be so uncomfortable to ride that you wouldn't want to use it.

You could also go with wheel weights. One thing to note is that if you need to handle the wheels during maintenance a 26/12x12 would weigh 150+ lbs. I use easily removable wheel weights on my 2320 because I can handle the 70lb wheels but with fluid they would be close to 250 which means it's a 2 man job.


I know that Rim Guard added #110 to my 26-12-12 tires, but don't know what they weighed with just air. I know that they were easier to get mounted than I expected, and this was in a rain soaked, muddy yard. Danged 1886 was stuck and the original turf tires weren't letting it move. I had to but down some 1/2" x 6" pieces of plywood to rest the jack on just to get it jacked up. I used another piece in to 'walk/wiggle' the wheel/tire onto the tractor. It did take two of us to get the tires lifted up into the bed of my F-150, but they weren't all that hard to unload and mount. I'll note that I'm not exactly a big guy either, as I weigh in at about #160 with a brick in each pocket

Edited by OldBuzzard, March 04, 2012 - 09:12 AM.

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#22 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted August 20, 2013 - 01:11 AM

. I'll note that I'm not exactly a big guy either, as I weigh in at about #160 with a brick in each pocket


You have me beat by 30 pounds lol. I have to run rediculas amounts of weight on the caterpillar which is a craftsman gt18 to compensate for my light weight and the fact that the transaxle is aluminum.... Stupid lol.

Should be getting the rears loaded this week with RimGuard, 7 gallons each, and going to run the same wheel weights I was this spring. So about 180 pounds on each rear tire. And I may throw 40 pounds extra on the left. I have a strange feeling that bad things will finally happen to the Caterpillar down at Ball Hollow plow day. I only been trying for 5 years, so Mabey this year is the year. I predict a cast aluminum hub will absolutely shatter lol.




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