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Advice On Adding Fluid


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#1 robby1276 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 02:04 PM

So I never added fluid to tires before I got new tires the old ones had fluid in them they was turf tires they was old as well been sitting for years I made chains for the tires and let air out of the tires put chains on and added air back to get them snug which I'm pretty sure played a big part why one split out on the sidewall So I went and bought new tires. Bar tread
Got them mounted just air and while they perform pretty good I still need the weight because I climb some steep hills and today was the first run with the new tires they had some trouble getting traction on the hills

So I'm going to get the fluid adaptor for the valve stems tomorrow and add fluid back. My question is how much air pressure should I add back I know it not going to the full amount any advice would be great

#2 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 02:22 PM

You can run the tires at the recommended air pressure with or without fluid. Are you running these new tires tubeless? There are different thoughts on this, but I always use tubes when running fluid.

#3 robby1276 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 02:44 PM

Well as if now tubeless I was thinking about adding some tubes but the thought of breaking them down to put tubes in isn't appealing

#4 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 03:31 PM

I always run tubes with fluid, I don't like having fluid in contact with my rims.

#5 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 07:10 PM

As has been said you still run the same air pressure in the tires with or without fluid. What type of fluid are you going to use? Calcium chloride mixed with water had been the standard fluid used for many years. The only problem is that it is very corosive and will eat your rims up. There was short time when farmers were told they could use fluid tubeless as long as they kept enough fluid in the tires to completely cover the rim but that didn't pan out very well. So if you are using calcium chloride I would strongly advise to put in tubes first. There are other liguids that you can use that are not corosive. I use winter grade windshield washer fluid in my tires. Not quite as heavy but cheap and doesn't eat your rims up. I still use tubes, my preferance. Some have used RV antifreeze. Some have used car radiator antifreeze but that stuff is very toxic and sweet tasting so any animals ( pets) are attracted to any leak of car antifreeze with very bad results. (they die)
Something new is using what is called RIM GUARD. It is basicly beet juice, heavy, non toxic and doesn't freeze.
This is just a quick rundown of some of what is available.

#6 robby1276 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 08:54 PM

I was going to use windshield washer fluid but curious to where I can get beet juice though

#7 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 10:15 PM

You could check with any local tire center that works on farm tractor tires or maybe a farm tractor dealer.Rim Guard is the products name so maybe do a search for a dealer. It is a somewhat new item and may not be readily available in all areas.

#8 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 11:49 PM

As Mike stated check local farm tire dealers. Rim Guard aka beet juice is getting quite popular due to its lack of corrosion. A lot of your counties are mixing it with road salt because it is a liquid and works faster than salt by it self.

#9 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted February 29, 2012 - 05:01 AM

I recently had Rim Guard put in the rear tires on my Bolens 1886. They are 26-12-12 tubeless ATV tires without tubes in them. At 11#/Gal, it added 110# per tire.

I highly recommend it.

The best way to find a dealer that can install it would be to go to the Rim Guard site. There is a phone number to call and they can tell you where the closest dealer to you is.
http://www.rimguard.biz/

One BIG thing to know about Rim Guard is that if you don't have them now, you WILL need to change the valve stems to METAL ones. Seems that something in it will attack the ADHESIVE that is used in the ribber valve stems, and they will start leaking.

I was impressed with how little it cost me. At my local John Deere dealer, they installed it for $3.60/Gal., which included the labor. All things considered that's VERY competitive with washer fluid.

Edited by OldBuzzard, February 29, 2012 - 05:08 AM.

  • JDBrian said thank you

#10 robby1276 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 29, 2012 - 11:30 AM

So I called rim guard got the local place that sells it which happens to be a John Deere dealer I'm not to find of them as it is anyways more so now The price per gal is $3.55 and that's with me putting it in if I want them to do it then they said they clock in whatever that means and the rate is $67 a hr plus the cost of the rim guard and they couldn't give me a average time it took to do it.

Now one other question I have when I spoke to rim guard they said it holds 7 gal and will add approx 72 pounds per tire my question is with that much weight will it put a strain on the transmission or possibly cause any harm I'm thinking about just adding four gal to each tire I would think that would be plenty enough weight I use this tractor to haul firewood so the weight of the wood and the fluid in tires would in my mind be a lot for it to haul

FYI I'm going to be doing it myself

Edited by robby1276, February 29, 2012 - 11:31 AM.


#11 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted February 29, 2012 - 12:17 PM

I had them put in the full amount on my 1886.

I also have a 1256 that has Ags that were filled by a PO.

Now I have no idea how long they have been filled, but the tires have a lot of wear on them, and it doesn't seem to have hurt the Hydro any.

I'd say go with the full amount.

ETA:

Filling them 'full' doesn't fill the whole tire though. You only fill the tire to around 75% or so. You need the airspace to let the tire flex,

If you fill the whole tire it will be like riding on steel wheels.

Edited by OldBuzzard, February 29, 2012 - 12:20 PM.


#12 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 07:32 AM

We ran the Rim Guard in many pieces of equipment for several years at the golf courses I worked at. Did not install tubes and used the original valve stems with no issues. I also have it in a pair of 26-12-12 and in a pair of 23-10,50-12 at home. Great product.

#13 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 11:53 AM

Interesting.

I was just going by what the guy at Rim Guard told me about rubber vs. metal valve stems.

Since I was putting a new set of tires on the 1886, I figured that it was worth putting the metal ones in since the ones in the rims were probably the original ones from 1971.

#14 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 12:11 PM

Will they sell the Rim Guard to you without installing it. I put in the manual section a rig you can build at home for filling tires with fluid. I'll look for it.


Here is the link...

http://gardentractor...e-filling-tank/

#15 robby1276 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 12:21 PM

Will they sell the Rim Guard to you without installing it. I put in the manual section a rig you can build at home for filling tires with fluid. I'll look for it.


Here is the link...

http://gardentractor...e-filling-tank/


Yeah they sell it for $3.55 a gal which I don't mind buying but I just put the new tires on with new valve stems so now I would have to change out the rubber ones for the metal ones which means taking it somewhere and getting tire broke down and I just don't feel like going through all that
I'm just going to get wwf and do it my self I just think $60 to get it done is high maybe I'm wrong




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