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Engine Of The Future?


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#16 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2012 - 08:27 PM

The other downsides that I see are that fuel injection is complicated enough as it is, now you have the injector and it's electrical and fuel connections moving, same with the spark plug for the "gas" fuel alternative. It's electrical connection would also have to be made via rotating contacts. It is hard enough to troubleshoot electrical connections that are not moving let alone ones that are.

#17 TUDOR OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2012 - 03:27 AM

Did you ever notice that all of these alternative engines are w - i - d - e . It would be hard to fit any of them in a normal sized engine bay, in either direction.

As far as the number of parts and their delicacy, anybody ever blow a timing belt on a regular engine? Bent valves and broken pistons have happened, and the engine usually stops pretty quick.

I'd be more concerned about belt stretch and its effect on timing than gear failure. Way too many timing belts involved, sevice intervals would have to be maintained religiously! As has been said, spark and fuel delivery will be problematical.

#18 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2012 - 09:32 AM

Concept cool, reality probably not, especially if this is a scam as Daniel has said. I agree with the too many parts/timing/wear/maint, etc, etc,.
What ever happened to the Wankel(sp) engine??

#19 tinner OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2012 - 12:31 AM

I think the same company may be selling a bridge in New York.

#20 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2012 - 05:42 AM

All that being said, that is a very interesting concept though.

#21 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2012 - 05:47 AM

Forget the timing belts. Every time I've put an engine together I've had to compress the rings to get them into the cylinder. That kind of friction fit is needed for good compression. These guys have pistons moving in and out of cylinders constantly. How do they get compression?

#22 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2012 - 08:08 AM

Forget the timing belts. Every time I've put an engine together I've had to compress the rings to get them into the cylinder. That kind of friction fit is needed for good compression. These guys have pistons moving in and out of cylinders constantly. How do they get compression?


There is supposed a floating ring on the cylinder which also provides some tolerance for alignment for the piston. This is why I want to see it run on duration test, 1,000 hours minimum and see if it is still going.

#23 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2012 - 09:30 AM

What ever happened to the Wankel(sp) engine??


The Wankel is still in production by Mazda, I think it is the R series of cars.

For Dans friends investment that is one huge 5HP engine. I cant beleive on that Prototype they did not add a cooling system (water or air) a starter (not the 220v motor) or a pulley to drive the oil pump (it was run by a drill!). All of that is usually done on the proof of concept model not the prototype.
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#24 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2012 - 10:26 AM

I'm not seeing the connections between the site I posted and the one Dan posted other than they are both concept designs. The design of the 2 engines are totally different. The CC engine site has a section that states they are trying to sell the design but doesn't say anyting about investors. They are also looking for someone to run more extensive tests on their design and appears they are wiling to pay. They are also showing pictures of completed engines, not just an engine sprawled on a test bench. The website Dan posted does give the impression they are trying to appease their investors. If we go far enough back in history, all engines were a prototype design. Can you imagine what they must have thought about James Watt back in the 1860s trying to design an engine to run on steam? Rudolph Diesel about blew himself up trying to prove his design. His first attempts used coal dust. Today we don't doubt the diesel engine at all. I think the CC design is a little far fetched with the pistons coming out of the cylinders but it is solving some of the drawbacks of the engine as we know today. From what I'm understanding, they are using that as the intake and exhaust but I'm not seeing how they keep them seperate. they do talk about having a vacuum to draw the exhaust as well as an EGR system. I think it would be fun to be associated with and work on some of these things. Oh Well....... Back to fixing stuff in the real world.

#25 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2012 - 10:35 AM

My apologies for partly hi-jacking your thread....not my intention at all.
No doubt they are 2 totally different animals, but your post reminded me of this one I posted of. My only reason for posting was because of my personal opinion of neither being something that will make it to real life use. If the CC engine has a chance of becoming a true marketed engine, it will likely be totally different from what it is now. It's a matter of "engine evolution". The "Dyno-Rev" has absolutely no chance at all!

#26 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2012 - 10:37 AM

I have to say that the website you posted was very interesting Doug! I also agree that if we are ever to move forward, designs must be dreamed up, prototypes built, and testing done. It's the way we move forward. I don't understand why they did what they did with the pistons and cylinders coming completely apart, but there are things we use every day that I don't understand! Part of what makes our hobby enjoyable to me is seeing the progression of the engine designs that are being used today. As we go back through the decades, we can see how today's engines evolved from the designs of the past. It's also interesting to see the designs that worked, but are dead ends evolutionarily speaking. We learn more from our failures than we do from our successes! We then know how NOT to do things and why! Thanks for posting the info Doug!

#27 brokenfeather OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2012 - 09:38 PM

Yea right. I guess you got to have something to do to keep you up late a night. Not overy impressed. But there were a few other things that went that I wasn't impressed with.

#28 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 08:05 AM

Very interesting read.--My assessment at first read.
1) This non-reciprocating engine is CLEARLY reciprocating.
2) The constant loading/unloading of the cylinder seal will be problematic
3) The entire gear assembly to hold this all together raises the issue of lube and wear.
4) Connecting this apparatus to a final drive may possibly be a major cost.
5) Re: the Dyno-Rev: No Engineer or physicist on the Board?
6) It took Felix Wankel 30 years to produce his rotary and although a good simple design, required years to stop oil leaks
at the output shaft. Today its still a good engine-If I'm designing the next greatest engine, I'll start there.
7) Also re: the Dyno-Rev "Variable power with constant input speed?" Sundstrand invented that and built the first in 1936 and called it a hydro-transmission.--------- just IMO

Edited by Toolpartzman, February 28, 2012 - 08:06 AM.

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#29 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 29, 2012 - 07:06 AM

I did not intend my post to sound so negative, but good design results always relies on addressing the problems. Our land is great because of people who think outside the box. Sadly most great inventions go begging when its comes to marketing the product. We've had electric cars for 200 years, and although the new ones are universally applauded, in the real world, we want our neighbors to buy them, not ourselves. We love the big V8s too much.




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