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Things To Look For In A Gt To Restore!

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#1 tractorgarden OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2012 - 10:07 PM

I know the rest of the gang will help out in this subject, so jump in and help guys! one thing I look for is a tractor that has original paint or the lack of paint, It is easier to refinish because you do not have to sand through all the other poor paint jobs. (Two) It is easy to want jump into a rare off brand tractor, well that is up you but be aware of avalible parts, for some people (me included) The hunt is the best part! We do not want to scare people away from this great hobby, So start small,have fun, ask us questions, dont rush, research before investing,and most of all have fun and SUPPORT GTtalk! ,Shawn
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#2 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2012 - 10:16 PM

Here is one that I will add. If it is advertised as running and it takes a couple tries and visits to make it run.... RUN AWAY!!

Not to scare anyone, but I didn't run, and now have a tractor I hate with too much invested into it, and it still isn't reliable.

Just because it is there doesn't mean it is the only one in the area, even if it's the first of it you seen in your area. Don't be afraid to PASS on a tractor.

Basically, make urself a check list of what is most important to you in the tractor or project and use it. If you can check every box then you have a winner.
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#3 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2012 - 10:51 PM

IMHO it is important to start with something you enjoy, Look for a tractor that you will enjoy owning, learning about, and working on, remember what my buddy mastifflawyer says...there'll be more. So, if you look at a tractor day one and say, this is boring, ugly or whatever skip it. Find something that intrigues you, I don't care if you admire how the transmission works, how the implements attach or how they achieve ground power. This is a critical element, once established...Each step will not be a chore, it will be fun to learn how to weld that cracked frame, or to pull the motor take it apart and send it off to the machine shop, get it back with a new bore, and start rewiring, flattening sheet metal, primering, filling, sanding making it perfect. The joy comes in the effort, the more you have to put into it, the greater your satisfaction in the end.

I've often wondered when this topic was going to be visited. There are skills to every part of this, mechanical, hydraulic, electrical, body, paint, welder, fabricator... and then there is the inevitable 'hunt' for the one part that you need to make your tractor 'perfect'...

Some people like that tractor that has a running motor, some like the 'basket cases' some the rare models only, some one of each year, some a single brand...the most important thing is to have fun at this and don't make every step a burden, sometimes you'll grow frustrated and have to walk away and catch your breath, ask for opinions and go back at it...remember to someone it was a lawnmower....

Good Luck...
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#4 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2012 - 11:10 PM

Dont Just buy it because you can. If it is not what you want dont buy it. If you want a Case 444 then dont buy a CASE 222 just because it came up at a good price. You will regret it because now that you have depleted your tractor fund, the Case 444 will come up for sale within the next week. Remember that people put these things up for sale all the time, be patient and get what you want. I cruise Ebay and CL everyday and see some great deals on GTs, but they are not the ones i am looking for. I will keep letting me tractor fund grow and I will be able to buy what i want and have money to put into getting it the way I want it.
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#5 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2012 - 11:53 PM

...If you want a Case 444 then dont buy a CASE 222 just because it came up at a good price.


This is exactly why I was able to take ownership of the Torq 224, the people were looking for the big wheel Case tractors came to look at a Gem and passed up a Jewel.
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#6 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2012 - 07:09 PM

Well, you just found your dream tractor, and it is complete. All pieces are there, and the tractor won't need anything but a restoration. Man, what a deal. You got the tractor for a good price, a lot less than you thought you were going to pay, and now you're all excited to tear into it, and get it looking like new again. So now, the tractor is in pieces, all the pieces are stripped and primed, and you're ready to start applying the finish coat. Boy are you excited, that is, until you go to buy the paint, the decals, rubber grip handles, tires, seat cushion, and maybe new electricals. You check with the dealer, and find out that most items are no longer available. The decals have to be custom made, so they are going to cost you more than originally budgeted for. Since the price tag for electricals has gotten higher, due to the overwhelming demand of trying to keep the shelf supplied, it's going to cost you almost double than what you thought. So, to try and turn your disappointment around, you go tire shopping. Are you a deer about to be hit by a truck, or are your eyes always that big? Oh, you just saw how expensive a set of tires are going to set you back! Believe it or not, these little things, are actually high dollar items, that a lot of guys don't give into consideration when budgeting on restoring a tractor. My advice, take some time to price these simple items out before making the final commitment. If you know what make and model tractor you want to look for, and buy, start educating yourself as to item availability and cost. Locate and buy a parts manual so that you have the parts numbers in front of you, then you can run the numbers by your dealer to see how much money you may be needing to save, and what isn't available. Start looking around to see who can or cannot reproduce the parts that aren't available anymore, and get a feel of weather this tractor type is really worth the time, money, labor, and patience. I know not being able to get what you have your heart set on hurts, but getting something that is going to take more money than you originally thought you were going to spend, or might not be able to finish, hurt even more. Don't be set on wanting the very first tractor you ever laid on, as you just might be surprised on how fast you change your mind while trying to find the right finishing touches! You want to do it right, as original as possible, and enjoy it afterwards. I hear so many guys starting with this same ambition, but when the tractor is all done, and the checking account is dry, all they do in the end is complain. Just have fun, enjoy, and be well educated.

Edited by johndeereelfman, February 22, 2012 - 07:16 PM.

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#7 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2012 - 08:32 AM

That pretty well sums it up, jdem. Parts can get darned expensive and hard to find, let alone tires and paint.
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#8 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2012 - 07:16 AM

The # 1 spot should be --" Be a GTT member". Lots of good folks here who can help. I would add a minor piece to all the above good tips and that would be: Is the PO truthful or lying? Lying, makes the all important assessment difficult. The PO of my MF12H told me "we drove it back here and parked it" Well, I later discovered a broken control link which made that impossible. Not that it would have killed the deal, but I wonder what else did he lied about.

If he says "It was running when parked". Make a quick scan to see if all the "make it run stuff" is connected.

Edited by Toolpartzman, March 02, 2012 - 07:17 AM.

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#9 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2012 - 07:45 AM

The # 1 spot should be --" Be a GTT member". Lots of good folks here who can help. I would add a minor piece to all the above good tips and that would be: Is the PO truthful or lying? Lying, makes the all important assessment difficult. The PO of my MF12H told me "we drove it back here and parked it" Well, I later discovered a broken control link which made that impossible. Not that it would have killed the deal, but I wonder what else did he lied about.

If he says "It was running when parked". Make a quick scan to see if all the "make it run stuff" is connected.




That is very good advice,Lee.
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#10 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2012 - 06:50 PM

If he says "It was running when parked".


How many times have we heard that???
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#11 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2012 - 06:55 PM

Another important thing to remember with any project is NOT to set a timetable for completion. Life has a way of messing with our schedules, so if you set a date, then as life slows things to a crawl, later you'll find yourself forced to work on it, rather than when you want to work on it. That takes all the fun from the whole project.
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#12 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2012 - 07:42 PM

When looking for a garden tractor to restore as said before find one that you like, make and model.
The more complete it is, the easier it is to make it work the way it should.
Buying a parts tractor like the one your restoring is a good source of parts and attachments.
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#13 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2012 - 07:56 PM

Another important thing to remember with any project is NOT to set a timetable for completion. Life has a way of messing with our schedules, so if you set a date, then as life slows things to a crawl, later you'll find yourself forced to work on it, rather than when you want to work on it. That takes all the fun from the whole project.


You are too correct, I keep trying that...
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#14 1farmboy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2012 - 10:20 PM

A funny thing here,, I have had my 78 ford gt125 for years.I juat use it, .I never did anyresearch on it at all.Then I aquired my farmcrest by accident pretty much.It was all compleet so i got interested in it.I ran across gtt and the article about quick manufacturing. well that really got me interested so i did research and have slowly started restorint it.Then I decided I wanted a tiller, and found they are kinda expensive, so I go to ebay, and found a jabsen with a tiller for not much more than just a tiller would cost.Now after some research on that, I find that jacobsen made my ford,so thanks to gtt, and you ppl helping me, I have really got interested in it. so thanks everybody in ggt.
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#15 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 02, 2012 - 10:54 PM

Another important thing to remember with any project is NOT to set a timetable for completion. Life has a way of messing with our schedules, so if you set a date, then as life slows things to a crawl, later you'll find yourself forced to work on it, rather than when you want to work on it. That takes all the fun from the whole project.


Excellent, excellent point! Couldn't agree more. Setting a completion date only makes you rush to get the tractor done, and believe me, it will show in the end.

Another thing too. If things get frustrating, don't be afraid to walk away, and come back to it later. And by later, it could be an hour, a day, or even a week. Another fine example for not setting a completion date for yourself. The more you rush, the worse things get. One day you could be trying to hook up a spring, and it just isn't working out, or you just can't get it to hook. Instead of continuing, getting mad, and having everything scratched up, just walk away. Come back to it after you had a chance to cool down.

I don't know about you guys, but if I have a bad day at work, and think I'll just go out to the shed and tinker, in hopes to unwind, I might as well forget about it. Most times, I come in from the shed madder than I was before I went out. I find that I have to be in the right state of mind, with a clear head, to work on a tractor, or nothing will go right. As stated above, you want to have fun while doing your project, because if you don't, you'll never want to do another one.

Edited by johndeereelfman, May 08, 2012 - 08:27 PM.

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