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Things Often Forgotten When Starting On That Restoration


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#31 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2012 - 06:03 AM

One thing I have been warned about is over-restoring. That is doing more than the factory did, things like grinding casting flash from a part when the factory never did.




I know just what you mean by over-restoring.I have seen that many times in the autobody field too.Take for example,a 1969 Ford Mustang.When they came off the assembly line,they would have a lot of primer over-spray on the under side of the floors.A lot of people when restoring,will not leave that over-spray showing.

Sure ,it's nice to have something looking perfect,but very few things coming from the factory are perfect.So if you want to do a "real" restore,do some research first,so you will know how it actually looked when it was new.

Edited by mjodrey, February 28, 2012 - 06:05 AM.

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#32 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 29, 2012 - 09:53 AM

Another cleaning tool that I just tried, and like the results, is a magic eraser. My wike uses them for cleaning miscellaneous items throughout the house. She recently cleaned crayon marks off the wall, that my youngest son drew, and so I thought I'd give it a try on a flat fender seat that had some scuff marks on it, that other cleaners wouldn't touch. The magic eraser not only took them off, but didn't cause any discoloration either.
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#33 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 29, 2012 - 10:30 AM

I know just what you mean by over-restoring.I have seen that many times in the autobody field too.Take for example,a 1969 Ford Mustang.When they came off the assembly line,they would have a lot of primer over-spray on the under side of the floors.A lot of people when restoring,will not leave that over-spray showing.

Sure ,it's nice to have something looking perfect,but very few things coming from the factory are perfect.So if you want to do a "real" restore,do some research first,so you will know how it actually looked when it was new.


As an example with my mccormick and deering horse drawn furrower, it was hand painted with a brush with no primer, now granted we can't use leaded paint (thank god !) it can be followed very easly. Same goes with the wooden main beam, it was rough cut lumber, with proper research originality can be achieved. Just about all pre-war (1940's) tractors, cars, trucks, tools were hand painted.
Sometimes perfection is just way too much (trailer qween), i like the subtle changes and imperfections, it gives the tool or tractor a unique personality.
Just a thought or two.
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#34 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted February 29, 2012 - 01:10 PM

Another cleaning tool that I just tried, and like the results, is a magic eraser. My wike uses them for cleaning miscellaneous items throughout the house. She recently cleaned crayon marks off the wall, that my youngest son drew, and so I thought I'd give it a try on a flat fender seat that had some scuff marks on it, that other cleaners wouldn't touch. The magic eraser not only took them off, but didn't cause any discoloration either.


I does work quite well. I have used it on a number of pieces of equipment but I really like it for the pipes on the bike. Takes the scuff marks off with out any scratching or damage.
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#35 redcarkids OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 05:20 PM

Here are some tips that I can add, and hopefully you can apply them for your own use:

-If you're able to find an Parts Manual for your tractor, photo copy each page, buy yourself a good set of colored pencils, and then color each part according to the original color requirements. This way, the photo copies can be kept in the garage and used for quick reference, plus it won't matter if they get a little overspray or grease on them. Sure beats ruining an original manual. I find this helpful, since I'm a collector of pretty much the same model, and it assures me that they will all be painted the same.

-Don't be so fast to replace the original tires, just because they are covered with grime and dirt stains, that don't come off with plain soap and water. Keep a bottle of Wesley's White Wall Tire Cleaner, a bottle of Ajax Cleaner, and a bottle of Bug and Tire handy. You'd be surprised at how well these cleaners get old tires looking good again. Follow up with Armoral and you're good to go.

-At most tractor show's that have a Flea Market area, you can usually find a vendor that sells Dentist picks or tools. They are usually priced for around $2-3 dollars, and are in a variety of different styles and sizes. I recommend getting a couple of these. You will be surprised what you'll use them for, and really come handy. I use my flat headed one for helping to clean grease out from between the head fins, scraping leftover paint that the sand blaster might have missed, and digging old grease out of the steering box. I have a pointed one that I use for cleaning the old grease out of grease zerks, cleaning dirt out of valve stems, and for digging broken keys out of ignition switches.

-Ever use WD-40 or Vasaline to clean Chrome? How about Oven Cleaner or Bug and Tar Remover, to remove engine grease?

-For times where you need to mask off parts for painting, I recommend using the blue painters tape, in lieu of the standard masking tape. The painters tape sticks good, but doesn't leave the glue residue on painted parts afterward.

-Use WD-40 and #0000 fine steel wool to help in removing overspray from original wiring harness's. After all paint is removed, bring back the wire shine with Armoral. To remove the plastic connectors from wiring harness's, get yourself a small jewelers flathead screwdriver, and insert it into the plug end of the terminal, gently! The wire can then be removed from the connector, and then be cleaned. I use an old toothbrush and WD-40 to get into the nooks and crannies of the connector, and finish up with Armoral. To re-insert the wire into the connector, simple pry the locking bar back up, on the wire plug, and stick it back into the connector.

-In ease of filling mounted transmissions, I use a kitchen turkey baster. Simply suck the gear oil out of the container, and fill.

-Other cleaners that I keep well stocked, are the following:
*Mothers Aluminum Cleaner
*Can of Nevr Dull polishing pads
*Maguires Auto Wax (Deep Dark Shine)
*Rubbing Compound
*Polishing Compound
*Dawn dishwashing liquid
*SOS Cleaning pads (with the pink soap)
*Simple Green
*Penetrating Oil
*Lok-Tite
*Paint thinner or mineral spirits

-Heplful items to have on hand:
*Empty coffee cans for storing nuts and bolts
*Empty soup cans, to spray paint into, for minor touch-ups
*Plenty of Painters Tape
*Wire wheels and cups
*Small touch-up brushes
*Newspaper, cardboard, and clear plastic
*Bathoom Tweezers
*Long handled stick mirror (telescopic)

Just my ideas, and things I use. Hope some are helpful and handy for you guys. I'm not perfect, but I try and make due with what I have available, the best that I can.

Very good write up. very helpful thanks for the ideas and input. :thumbs:
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#36 redcarkids OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 05:26 PM

You may want to add that 3m masks or surgical mask should be used. If you have ever sanded paint off or sandblasted a mask should be used to keep dust particals out of your nose and lungs, also when you paint.
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#37 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 05:47 PM

You may want to add that 3m masks or surgical mask should be used. If you have ever sanded paint off or sandblasted a mask should be used to keep dust particals out of your nose and lungs, also when you paint.



Very important. Wear the right mask for the job. A dust mask isn't good enough for paint. Those fumes, will drop
your IQ in a hurry.
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#38 Bipitybopityboo OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 06:40 PM

This is a fantastic thread. Full of great ideas for us new guys. Almost gives a fella hope that it is possible.
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#39 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2012 - 08:47 PM

You may want to add that 3m masks or surgical mask should be used. If you have ever sanded paint off or sandblasted a mask should be used to keep dust particals out of your nose and lungs, also when you paint.



Awe, come on man, I like to see my green and yellow boogies when I blow my nose after all day of painting! LOL

Seriously though, that is a very good point. Try and get yourself a mask that has the changable charcoal filters. May seem like overkill, but we want you guys around here for a long time!

I like to wear safety glass too. Ones that will fit snug to the contours of your face structure. You just can't imagine how much your eyes absorb the overspray. How many of us accidently had the spray nozzle pointed the wrong direction one time or another? Eye protection is also valuable while painting above you. If you can feel the overspray on you face and arms, just imagine how much you're getting in your eyes without protection?

When grinding, sanding, or sandblasting, always wear earplugs or some other type of good ear protection. You will only regret it later if you don't. This topic is pretty much self explanitory, so I won't say anything more about it, other than, just use common sense.

Edited by johndeereelfman, March 04, 2012 - 06:15 PM.

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#40 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2012 - 09:03 PM

If you are a collector of multiple brands of tractors, and have a couple of them torn apart at the same time, paint your empty coffee cans, plastic bins, or whatever you use to store parts, the same color of the tractor brand, that is holding those parts. Colored construction paper taped to the outside of the containers works also. This helps in organizing all of your John Deere, Case, Cub Cadet, or whatever brand clearly, without having to go through all of your containers, looking for a Wheel Horse part. For brands that share the same color, mark the beginning letter of that certain brand, on the painted surface or colored paper so there is no confusion.
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#41 Billygoat OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 07:42 PM

One thing I have been warned about is over-restoring. That is doing more than the factory did, things like grinding casting flash from a part when the factory never did.

That brings out issues with restoring Cases. They install parts like the travel control valve, transaxle and some other stuff, then paint it. If I go through all the work of disassembling, sandblasting, painting, etc. each piece will be fully painted before reassembly. I don't restore tractors by definition, I guess I refurbish. I just couldn't bring myself to put something together with bare metal when I can protect it. If the purists thumb their nose at me so be it. My stuff is for using, not showing, so I guess it won't matter unless I should sell something.
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#42 kwj427 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2013 - 08:53 AM

very good tips!


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