Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo

Things Often Forgotten When Starting On That Restoration


  • Please log in to reply
41 replies to this topic

#16 chris m OFFLINE  

chris m

    Tractorholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8148
  • 3,277 Thanks
  • 4,033 posts
  • Location: Charlestown,Rhode Island

Posted February 21, 2012 - 09:18 PM

This site is great!!!! There is nothing any of us couldn't do with the great minds and information that this site and it's members have to offer! :thumbs:
  • tractorgarden, johndeereelfman and karinam18 have said thanks

#17 IHCubGuy OFFLINE  

IHCubGuy

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 3438
  • 1,356 Thanks
  • 1,474 posts
  • Location: Northumberland Pa

Posted February 21, 2012 - 09:44 PM

The most difficult restoration we've ever undertaken was that of our 1926 McCormick Deering 15-30 farm tractor. With most big tractor restorations we buy ourselves an I.T. manual. This tractor though had none available. There were original service and operators manuals that we bought that helped us some but not well. The biggest asset we had was a reprint of the original parts breakdown. It showed all the parts of the machine thru all years of production and what parts changed at what serial number break. When we first started we could not find the serial number anywhere on parts(the serial number tag was LONGGGGGG since gone) but we knew it was a 26 model. So as we tore it apart I checked casting numbers on parts that I knew changed from brousing the parts book and eventually had it narrowed down to within a serial number range of 5000. That seems like a wide range till you realize they made over 150,000 of them. Eventually near the end of the restoration I did find the serial number hidden on a part of the engine which did confirm the year and it also showed how invaluable the parts book was as it had guided us to the correct range of serial numbers.

PIctures are ones best friend in a restoration. I would go so far as to say if you can still get film develpoed to go old school and use a trusty old 35mm camera and then hide the pics away with your books on the tractor as you don't have to worry about losing them in a computer mishap. Our tractor took 10 years of tracking down elusive parts and working on it on and off to finish. Thats where having good records and orginaization come in handy as I can guarantee that I didn't remember things from when I started.
  • KennyP, HDWildBill, chris m and 1 other said thanks

#18 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

wvbuzzmaster

    Squeaky Wheel

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1792
  • 4,492 Thanks
  • 7,341 posts
  • Location: West Virginia

Posted February 21, 2012 - 10:31 PM

I am notorious for not finishing projects I start. Here is my tip, don't overwork yourself on a project the first couple days, and if you don't feel up to it that day, tinker on small parts, or stay away til the next day.

Any time something goes from good to bad to worse, go in the house and post on the forum, we WILL feel your pain and help to remotivate you lol. After about an hour or so you will be back out there pissed off and ready to kick that projects paint chips LOL.

OH, remember to have fun! lol
  • KennyP, tractorgarden, Littledeere and 2 others have said thanks

#19 chris m OFFLINE  

chris m

    Tractorholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8148
  • 3,277 Thanks
  • 4,033 posts
  • Location: Charlestown,Rhode Island

Posted February 21, 2012 - 10:55 PM

I am notorious for not finishing projects I start. Here is my tip, don't overwork yourself on a project the first couple days, and if you don't feel up to it that day, tinker on small parts, or stay away til the next day.

Any time something goes from good to bad to worse, go in the house and post on the forum, we WILL feel your pain and help to remotivate you lol. After about an hour or so you will be back out there pissed off and ready to kick that projects paint chips LOL.

OH, remember to have fun! lol

:yeah_that:

#20 coldone OFFLINE  

coldone

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 839
  • 1,631 Thanks
  • 1,668 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted February 21, 2012 - 11:08 PM

-Use WD-40 and #0000 fine steel wool to help in removing overspray from original wiring harness's. After all paint is removed, bring back the wire shine with Armoral. To remove the plastic connectors from wiring harness's, get yourself a small jewelers flathead screwdriver, and insert it into the plug end of the terminal, gently! The wire can then be removed from the connector, and then be cleaned. I use an old toothbrush and WD-40 to get into the nooks and crannies of the connector, and finish up with Armoral. To re-insert the wire into the connector, simple pry the locking bar back up, on the wire plug, and stick it back into the connector.




It just so happens that i have been trying to track down some of those connectors. In my "Quest for Connection" I found that the style of connectors used are referred to as " Packard series 56 unsealed connectors". You will have to google the phrase and then search for you particular style of connector as that there are many different style ie...1 wire, 2 wire, 3 wire.

The actual replacement crimp connectors (the metal piece) is available separately

Edited by coldone, February 21, 2012 - 11:10 PM.

  • IamSherwood, KennyP, tractorgarden and 4 others have said thanks

#21 coldone OFFLINE  

coldone

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 839
  • 1,631 Thanks
  • 1,668 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted February 21, 2012 - 11:20 PM

One of my tips for working on large projects is to break it down into smaller sub-projects. In the case of GT restoration, instead of looking at the pile of parts that you just created by taking it down to the frame, look at each sub section separately. Frame, front axle, steering, engine etc. Work on just that one sub section until its done then move to the next. This way you will not feel over burdened when you look at the whole pile. Plus it lets you feel like you are getting somewhere when one section is complete. If you hit a wall with that one sub section (waiting on parts, money) then move to the next inline and make some progress.

Also try to something when you go out to your project. Even if its something simple like cleaning a single bolt. Not all of us have tons of spare time and all of us would love to dedicate all the time we have to our projects but it just dosent happen. So try to accomplish something with each visit.
  • Alc, KennyP, Littledeere and 5 others have said thanks

#22 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

HDWildBill

    Freedom is not Free. Thank those in uniform for your freedom.

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 6354
  • 8,700 Thanks
  • 8,555 posts
  • Location: Ga

Posted February 22, 2012 - 09:51 AM

Very sound advice. I remember projects when the adrenalin wears off, you have a big pile of oh no.


I love that expression and I can identify with it. This is a great thread with some really good info. Some how if always makes me feel better to know that I'm not the only one who screws up. :)
  • johndeereelfman and chris m have said thanks

#23 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

johndeereelfman

    Elfin Majic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 3761
  • 5,480 Thanks
  • 2,535 posts
  • Location: Lititz, PA

Posted February 23, 2012 - 11:23 PM

If you have some chrome pieces on your tractors, that have overspray on them, or are starting to show some rust, try going over it lightly with the following:

:Rust stains - #0000 steel wool and Bug and Tar remover. Follow up with standard chrome cleaner or polish afterwards.

:Overspray - #0000 steel wool and WD-40. The Wd-40 will soften the paint overspray, and also act as a lubricant between the chrome finish and the steel wool.

You already know how I take care of serial plates, so I won't touch on that subject again, but I do want to add two more tools that I have in my toolbox, that are very handy. Stainless Steel and Brass bristled wire brushes. Either one will help in poilishing aluminum carbs, heads, chrome, and brass adjustment screws on carbs.

Run a coat of dishwashing liquid around the bead of your new tires before you mount them, to aid in easier mounting. Will also let you know if you have any leaks, once mounted and aired up, as bubbles will show if not properly seated.

If your shop or garage has exposed roof joists, run some 1 1/4" drywall screws, into the sides of the joists, spaced about 16" apart, to store painted parts, so that you can still use your normal paint rack. I also use my wifes clothsline, when available as a drying rack while painting. I also use the roof joists for storing extra parts as well, so I don't have to store so many parts on shelves. My wife picks up wire hangers for me whenever she goes out to yard sales. Most of the time, you can get 50-100 hangers for $.25.

Invest some money in parts drawer cabinets. You know, the small cabinets that have numerous sized sliding drawers. Very handy for small parts, pieces, and small bolts, nuts and washers. Hang them on your walls, to help free up countertop space.

Build a tire rack on the wall, if possible. Tires can be kept up and out of the way. No need to move them, whenever you want to pull a tractor out, or to sweep up the shop a little.

Some of you guys may not know what I'm talking about here, but whenever I can find the old gavanized chicken nesters, I buy them. They can be mounted to the wall, and used for storing all kinds of bolts, nuts and washers. Whenever I need to buy miscellaneous hardware, I try and buy a box of 100, so I don't have to keep running back and forth to the hardware store. These chicken nesters are perfect for storing all of these boxes.

Edited by johndeereelfman, March 01, 2012 - 09:29 PM.

  • daytime dave, tractorman604, Texas Deere and Horse and 5 others have said thanks

#24 mjodrey OFFLINE  

mjodrey

    Accumulator

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 92
  • 2,343 Thanks
  • 13,481 posts
  • Location: Upper Granville, Nova Scotia, Canada

Posted February 24, 2012 - 05:50 AM

Very sound advice. I remember projects when the adrenalin wears off, you have a big pile of oh no.




How very true that is.

#25 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

Texas Deere and Horse

    RED Wild Hogs, Horses & Deeres

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1435
  • 14,464 Thanks
  • 15,392 posts
  • Location: East of San Antonio Texas

Posted February 24, 2012 - 05:17 PM

Some of you guys may not know what I'm talking about here, but whenever I can find the old gavanized chicken nesters, I buy them. The can be mounted to the wall, and used for storing all kinds of bolts, nuts and washers. Whenever I need to buy miscellaneous hardware, I try and buy a box of 100, so I don't have to keep running back and forth to the hardware store. These chicken nesters are perfect for storing all of these boxes.


Troy, I know exactly what these are and what a great idea. THANKS !!
  • johndeereelfman said thank you

#26 dangeroustoys56 OFFLINE  

dangeroustoys56

    New Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 8507
  • 18 Thanks
  • 22 posts

Posted February 25, 2012 - 06:43 PM

Ive pulled a few tractors apart , a few were in pieces longer then i intended and forget how things go back together - i use old coffee cans for nuts and bolts , boxes for other parts - i try to keep things together for certain areas ( motor stuff in one, stuff for trans/rear end in another).

Oddly , i pulled my 86GTII totally apart , totally painted it and was able to put it back together correctly - i have to say theres a bunch of heavy pieces on it , since it had sat for a long time before the rebuild , i basically went thru and replaced all the fuel lines, wiring, ect while it was in pieces and easy to get to. One of these days i need to repaint the sheetmetal, it didnt come out like i wanted....

My current project - a 90 MTD Task force - started out as a regular mower, the frame ended up rotting out, causing mechanical issues , so i replaced the frame with a spare i had, i intended to just paint the frame and swap the pieces over ( all rusty and greasy) , but basically i went thru and cleaned/painted everything, greased and replaced all the pins, so basically itll be a brand new tractor when its done.

Usually when i use a tractor for parts, i strip all the nuts and bolts worth salvaging off it - those are great for an extra part on another project, and again save them in coffee cans or small totes.

I do have to say all my extra parts come in handy , saves me a trip to the parts store and more money into the project.
  • Littledeere and hatedge have said thanks

#27 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

johndeereelfman

    Elfin Majic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 3761
  • 5,480 Thanks
  • 2,535 posts
  • Location: Lititz, PA

Posted February 25, 2012 - 08:13 PM

Some other items of interest:

-I save my wifes empty laundry detergent and fabric softener containers for storing and transporting drained motor oil and gear oil.

-I keep all of our old and used toothbrushes for miscellaneous cleaning and polishing.

-If I pass some yard or garage sales, I always stop in to see if they have any baby blankets, wash towels or bed sheets for sale, as they can usually be bought cheap, and be used for polishing rags, clean up rags, and tractor covers.

-I'm constantly watching the fliers for plastic storage bin sales, as these hold up much better than cardboard boxes.

-If you have a mattress store near by, stop in and ask them to start saving you the plastic covers used for shipping the mattress. Most times the store will just give you them, as they throw them away. Ask them to slice the plastic along the side edge (length) of the plastic wrap when they put out a new floor model. Makes for a real nice tractor cover!

-Seat covers that seem to be stained to the point of no return, can in most cases, be cleaned up with a light coating of polishing compound. After using the compound, wash the seat real good, and then follow up with Armoral.

-To help keep bugs away from freshly painted parts, try spraying your work area with Listerine Mouth Wash. Bugs hate the smell of this stuff. It's cheap, and it works! Use it straight up, and not dilluted. I get my wife to pick me up a couple of bottles and I put it right into an empty Spray Nine bottle.

Edited by johndeereelfman, February 25, 2012 - 08:13 PM.

  • mjodrey, tractorman604, Littledeere and 4 others have said thanks

#28 Littledeere OFFLINE  

Littledeere

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2778
  • 1,545 Thanks
  • 1,443 posts
  • Location: Ruckersville VA

Posted February 26, 2012 - 08:58 AM

One thing I like to do is Get a tractor going , lets see were the problems are {trans does not work correctly, jumps out of gear,motor knocks,leaks oil badly somewere,
does not steer good one way ,deck lift hangs up } most won't tear a trans down even though they replace seals ,or rebuild a motor from the ground up you need to know how deep you need to go.It can be a let down to clean up and paint things pretty to find out it was not working win you took it apart

I know sometimes this is not possible but if you can it will help in the long run
  • johndeereelfman, chris m and hatedge have said thanks

#29 Amigatec OFFLINE  

Amigatec

    Collector of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5899
  • 2,023 Thanks
  • 3,172 posts
  • Location: Haskell Oklahoma

Posted February 26, 2012 - 09:18 AM

One thing I have been warned about is over-restoring. That is doing more than the factory did, things like grinding casting flash from a part when the factory never did.
  • caseguy, johndeereelfman and chris m have said thanks

#30 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,418 Thanks
  • 39,668 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted February 27, 2012 - 07:57 AM

I'm glad we have this thread going. I will visit it often as I start the GTV refurbish. I am not going for a restore, just believe it deserves to look better, fix a few issues. Thanks to everyone for their comments.
  • johndeereelfman, chris m and hatedge have said thanks




Top