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Things Often Forgotten When Starting On That Restoration


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#1 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2012 - 10:03 PM

This may seem Trivial to some, but to the first time Restorer these are things that are easily overlooked.

I know how it is when you get that GT and it's your first one,you get excited to tear into it right away!
Next thing you know the adrenalin wears off a bit and you you have nothing but a GT frame in front of you and parts and pieces are everywhere!

So just remember to take your time. Take lots of pictures before dismantling anything.

Draw diagrams and take measurements of anything that has an adjustment to it!

Tag your parts and put in containers grouped with like items

( You don't want to assume that you will remember that there was a .005 shim on the front of something and a .030 shim on the back!)

*With allot of these classic GT's, Books and diagrams are hard to find!

I know this seems like common sense but It is very easy for anyone to forget this! Myself included!

So good luck and above all else DO NOT RUSH!

Thanks Chris
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#2 tractorgarden OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2012 - 10:29 PM

One thing I will add is remember your serial # ,model # etc. . Many tractor manuf. have made running changes through out the production of a model. So your parts machine that looks the same on the outside, may not supply you the parts that you may need!
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#3 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 05:01 AM

One thing I have find that helps a lot is a good parts breakdown, I will study it until I am sure how thing go. A lot of time the PO will make a change that looks factory but isnt original. Sometimes this is an improvement and sometimes it may need to be undone.

Also look for breaks in the seriel numbers, tractor built before or after a SN may have changes.

Edited by Amigatec, February 21, 2012 - 05:02 AM.

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#4 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 05:30 AM

Well said guys. :iagree: :thumbs:
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#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 06:40 AM

Good info to dwell on, guys. I hope to start tearing one apart soon and pics will be a must have as I tear it down. Can't say it will be a restoration, I'm too cheap for that. But a good refurbishment and prettied up.
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#6 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 07:26 AM

One thing I find to be an important part of the resto process, is the nuts and bolts.
As said, bag em and label them. Save yourself a lot of head scratching later.

I started a thread about the hardware a year ago.
http://gardentractor...dpost__p__49026

I find this part of a restoration to be boring, unrewarding, etc, but necessary. So what I've been doing lately, is tackle
it a bit at a time at the very start of the project, rather than leaving it till the end, when you need them.
Sorta like not leaving the potatoes till after you've eaten the steak.
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#7 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 08:03 AM

Remember that Rome wasn't built in a day. Take the time to do it right the first time. Nothing worse that bolting a part back on and three steps down the road having to take it off to put on something that needed to go on first. Been there done that.
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#8 daytime dave ONLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 08:38 AM

Very sound advice. I remember projects when the adrenalin wears off, you have a big pile of oh no.
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#9 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 06:04 PM

Very sound advice. I remember projects when the adrenalin wears off, you have a big pile of oh no.

It's so true! I know i've done it cause I left the camera in the house and didn't feel like walking the 30' to go get it. then like you said, Oh No, LOL.

#10 Billygoat OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 08:23 PM

Download those pics to at least two different devices. You never know when a drive will go up. A flash drive is really handy to have for a back-up.
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#11 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 08:24 PM

Download those pics to at least two different devices. You never know when a drive will go up. A flash drive is really handy to have for a back-up.

Another great point! :thumbs:

#12 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 08:46 PM

Here are some tips that I can add, and hopefully you can apply them for your own use:

-If you're able to find an Parts Manual for your tractor, photo copy each page, buy yourself a good set of colored pencils, and then color each part according to the original color requirements. This way, the photo copies can be kept in the garage and used for quick reference, plus it won't matter if they get a little overspray or grease on them. Sure beats ruining an original manual. I find this helpful, since I'm a collector of pretty much the same model, and it assures me that they will all be painted the same.

-Don't be so fast to replace the original tires, just because they are covered with grime and dirt stains, that don't come off with plain soap and water. Keep a bottle of Wesley's White Wall Tire Cleaner, a bottle of Ajax Cleaner, and a bottle of Bug and Tar remover handy. You'd be surprised at how well these cleaners get old tires looking good again. Follow up with Armoral and you're good to go.

-At most tractor show's that have a Flea Market area, you can usually find a vendor that sells Dentist picks or tools. They are usually priced for around $2-3 dollars, and are in a variety of different styles and sizes. I recommend getting a couple of these. You will be surprised what you'll use them for, and really come handy. I use my flat headed one for helping to clean grease out from between the head fins, scraping leftover paint that the sand blaster might have missed, and digging old grease out of the steering box. I have a pointed one that I use for cleaning the old grease out of grease zerks, cleaning dirt out of valve stems, and for digging broken keys out of ignition switches.

-Ever use WD-40 or Vasaline to clean Chrome? How about Oven Cleaner or Bug and Tar Remover, to remove engine grease?

-For times where you need to mask off parts for painting, I recommend using the blue painters tape, in lieu of the standard masking tape. The painters tape sticks good, but doesn't leave the glue residue on painted parts afterward.

-Use WD-40 and #0000 fine steel wool to help in removing overspray from original wiring harness's. After all paint is removed, bring back the wire shine with Armoral. To remove the plastic connectors from wiring harness's, get yourself a small jewelers flathead screwdriver, and insert it into the plug end of the terminal, gently! The wire can then be removed from the connector, and then be cleaned. I use an old toothbrush and WD-40 to get into the nooks and crannies of the connector, and finish up with Armoral. To re-insert the wire into the connector, simple pry the locking bar back up, on the wire plug, and stick it back into the connector.

-In ease of filling mounted transmissions, I use a kitchen turkey baster. Simply suck the gear oil out of the container, and fill.

-Other cleaners that I keep well stocked, are the following:
*Mothers Aluminum Cleaner
*Can of Nevr Dull polishing pads
*Maguires Auto Wax (Deep Dark Shine)
*Rubbing Compound
*Polishing Compound
*Dawn dishwashing liquid
*SOS Cleaning pads (with the pink soap)
*Simple Green
*Penetrating Oil
*Lok-Tite
*Paint thinner or mineral spirits

-Heplful items to have on hand:
*Empty coffee cans for storing nuts and bolts
*Empty soup cans, to spray paint into, for minor touch-ups
*Plenty of Painters Tape
*Wire wheels and cups
*Small touch-up brushes
*Newspaper, cardboard, and clear plastic
*Bathoom Tweezers
*Long handled stick mirror (telescopic)

Just my ideas, and things I use. Hope some are helpful and handy for you guys. I'm not perfect, but I try and make due with what I have available, the best that I can.

Edited by johndeereelfman, April 09, 2012 - 08:02 PM.

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#13 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 08:52 PM

Here are some tips that I can add, and hopefully you can apply them for your own use:

-If you're able to find an Parts Manual for your tractor, photo copy each page, buy yourself a good set of colored pencils, and then color each part according to the original color requirements. This way, the photo copies can be kept in the garage and used for quick reference, plus it won't matter if they get a little overspray or grease on them. Sure beats ruining an original manual. I find this helpful, since I'm a collector of pretty much the same model, and it assures me that they will all be painted the same.

-Don't be so fast to replace the original tires, just because they are covered with grime and dirt stains, that don't come off with plain soap and water. Keep a bottle of Wesley's White Wall Tire Cleaner, a bottle of Ajax Cleaner, and a bottle of Bug and Tire handy. You'd be surprised at how well these cleaners get old tires looking good again. Follow up with Armoral and you're good to go.

-At most tractor show's that have a Flea Market area, you can usually find a vendor that sells Dentist picks or tools. They are usually priced for around $2-3 dollars, and are in a variety of different styles and sizes. I recommend getting a couple of these. You will be surprised what you'll use them for, and really come handy. I use my flat headed one for helping to clean grease out from between the head fins, scraping leftover paint that the sand blaster might have missed, and digging old grease out of the steering box. I have a pointed one that I use for cleaning the old grease out of grease zerks, cleaning dirt out of valve stems, and for digging broken keys out of ignition switches.

-Ever use WD-40 or Vasaline to clean Chrome? How about Oven Cleaner or Bug and Tar Remover, to remove engine grease?

-For times where you need to mask off parts for painting, I recommend using the blue painters tape, in lieu of the standard masking tape. The painters tape sticks good, but doesn't leave the glue residue on painted parts afterward.

-Use WD-40 and #0000 fine steel wool to help in removing overspray from original wiring harness's. After all paint is removed, bring back the wire shine with Armoral. To remove the plastic connectors from wiring harness's, get yourself a small jewelers flathead screwdriver, and insert it into the plug end of the terminal, gently! The wire can then be removed from the connector, and then be cleaned. I use an old toothbrush and WD-40 to get into the nooks and crannies of the connector, and finish up with Armoral. To re-insert the wire into the connector, simple pry the locking bar back up, on the wire plug, and stick it back into the connector.

-In ease of filling mounted transmissions, I use a kitchen turkey baster. Simply suck the gear oil out of the container, and fill.

-Other cleaners that I keep well stocked, are the following:
*Mothers Aluminum Cleaner
*Can of Nevr Dull polishing pads
*Maguires Auto Wax (Deep Dark Shine)
*Rubbing Compound
*Polishing Compound
*Dawn dishwashing liquid
*SOS Cleaning pads (with the pink soap)

-Heplful items to have on hand:
*Empty coffee cans for storing nuts and bolts
*Empty soup cans, to spray paint into, for minor touch-ups
*Plenty of Painters Tape
*Wire wheels and cups
*Small touch-up brushes
*Newspaper, cardboard, and clear plastic
*Bathoom Tweezers
*Long handled stick mirror (telescopic)

Just my ideas, and things I use. Hope some are helpful and handy for you guys. I'm not perfect, but I try and make due with what I have available, the best that I can.

You should have made this a new thread! This is a great article of tips and it deserves it's own heading! great ideas!! Thanks Chris :thumbs:
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#14 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 08:57 PM

Very sound advice. I remember projects when the adrenalin wears off, you have a big pile of oh no.


Pile of "Oh No!" Man I love that turn of phrase!
Thanks

#15 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2012 - 09:13 PM

This should be a pinned thread for starter and new comers, filled to the brim with info and idears, great guys, absolutly great.
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