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Miller 110 Welder $300


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#1 robby1276 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 03:36 PM

I have the chance to buy a miller 110v mig welder for $300 I however don't know how to weld or know much about welders. It brand new never been used. Not hot either a retired guy owns it he was a welder it was given to him at retirement
Any suggestions good buy or not

#2 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 03:56 PM

What size is it? 140, 180 ??

#3 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 03:58 PM

New 110v Model 140 Miller AutoMatic Wire welders start at around $850.00, and go up from there!!

#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 04:27 PM

Those are pricey aren't they. Make sure it's actually a MIG and not just a wire feed. Many people make that mistake when listing items for sale. I don't know if it's because they don't know the difference or what. It is misleading but beware because it does happen. Have a look at this thread http://gardentractor...g-setups-folks/ It shows some of the other stuff you need to start welding as well as the welder itself. If you check out the major welding supplier sites like Miller, lincoln etc you can learn some of the basics. There are also lots of tutorials and videos on Youtube. It's a valuable skill to have.

#5 robby1276 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 04:35 PM

Well all the info I have is third hand it a girl I work with dads welder I asked for as much info as possible she telling me it's a miller mig welder. Model 125 but I can't find any online they all 140 or 135. And it's five years old and I was wrong it was used one time I'm going to try and get more info possibly go see it in person then I'll know for sure I just don't want to wait to long because if it is a good deal it won't last long

#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 04:36 PM

Robby you will never learn any younger. I don't own a welder, since my dad and a couple brothers are very good welders.
But the last time I took something into dad to weld. He welded it and told me" That 110 welder is lighter to carry than the parts you had me weld. Next time just come get the welder".

Edited by JD DANNELS, February 13, 2012 - 04:36 PM.


#7 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 06:25 PM

Miller bought out Hobart some time ago and I believe that at that time, they stopped putting their name on the smaller homeowner type machines, badging them instead as Hobarts. If you check out the Hobart 125 MIG welder Here you'll get a good idea what type / size machine you'll be looking at. Notice that the one in the link says "MIG ready" and not MIG. That means that there's other stuff you'll have to buy to do actual MIG (inert gas shielded) welding. As is the machine will only do wire feed or flux core welding. Whether or not the one you're looking at includes some of those "extras" will determine how much it's actually worth. One thing that's for sure is that Miller is one of the best welders out there!

#8 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 06:41 PM

Kind of a more general question: Are the 110 volt welders able to weld 1/4" steel okay?

I wouldn't mind teaching myself to stick steel together...easier than dragging everything down to my BIL's or our to my friend's place...and I have some very crude experience from my younger days. I don't really want to replace the breaker box in my house, trench a line to the garage, and install a sub-panel there though. If I want to do 240 welding, that's what's involved before I even go shopping for a welder.

I'm at a couple of welder supply places a week for work, and I've asked about the little welders, but the guys there are really non-commital. I'm not thinking of doing any major fabrication work or anything, but it would be cool to do my own repairs and maybe learn a thing or two.

#9 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 09:31 PM

The Hobart Handler 125 that I linked to above is rated to weld up to 3/16" in a single pass. The next step up, the Handler 140 is rated to weld up to 1/4" in a single pass. It is also powered by standard 110V house current. That said, even with the 125 you can weld 1/4" in multiple passes. One of the factors to consider is that the 140 is about $130 more than the 125.
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#10 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 09:39 PM

you're never worse for wear learning a new skill! The welder appears to be fine for most of the stuff gt related...I use a 110 welder for all my body panels on my own stuff, and any misc stuff around the house, lawnmowers fences, etc...110 s fine and while I don't have any information on that specific welder $300 will save you tons of time and money not worried about can I fix this or how do it do this or can it fit in the truck or any of the other stuff, so IMHO I"d go for it...providin you have the $

#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2012 - 02:52 PM

Kind of a more general question: Are the 110 volt welders able to weld 1/4" steel okay?

I wouldn't mind teaching myself to stick steel together...easier than dragging everything down to my BIL's or our to my friend's place...and I have some very crude experience from my younger days. I don't really want to replace the breaker box in my house, trench a line to the garage, and install a sub-panel there though. If I want to do 240 welding, that's what's involved before I even go shopping for a welder.

I'm at a couple of welder supply places a week for work, and I've asked about the little welders, but the guys there are really non-commital. I'm not thinking of doing any major fabrication work or anything, but it would be cool to do my own repairs and maybe learn a thing or two.


As an observer who has never owned one, I can say that my dad has one of the cheap Harbor Freight 110 volt machines with the flux core wire. And I'm amazed at the things he does with it. And I think one of the small wire welders flux core or Mig would be a good investment. I have been to a few welding supply companies in the Des Moines area and they have told me they sell the welders to primarily support the money maker in Gasses. They are really geared towards supplying Manufacturing and Fabrication shops and as such the light duty units are to them more a toy than a serious tool. So it makes sense that they would be noncommital.. I only have 110 volts service to my garage and hope to build a serious shop in a few years. So like you the 110 volt unit is the direction I would go. If I needed heavy welding done I would take the project to my brothers shop..
But I hate leaving the place when I have some small thing that takes longer to drive somewhere than it does to do it in the garage. I'm not unsociable, but a 10 minute job takes well over an hour when you stop to visit with friends or family. That hour does not get the lawn mowed.

Edited by JD DANNELS, February 14, 2012 - 02:55 PM.

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#12 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2012 - 05:59 PM

I know what you mean about a ten minute job taking forever. It's 30 minutes each way to my BIL's. My welding friend is about 45 minutes each way now. So you load everything on the truck (or trailer), drive there, have a beer, get the welding done, have another beer, usually look at whatever projects they are working on while they have another beer (I have to drive home so two is my limit), then drive back here and try out whatever part you had welded. It eats up a ton of time.

I'll have to check out Princess Auto (our version of Tractor Supply) and see what they've got and how much they want for the small welders.




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