Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Woodworkers' Tools for Tin Work


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

Toolpartzman

    Fun With Horsepower

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 7171
  • 468 Thanks
  • 1,280 posts
  • Location: Little Rock,AR

Posted February 10, 2012 - 03:44 PM

I thought it may be of help to those who have an occasional minor "body-work" problem, that ordinary woodworking tools can help. Here, I'm using clamps to straighten the seat pan off my MF12-(every flat area was twisted out of square) and an angle finder to mate-up the left and right sides. The seat-to-back spot weld was also broken loose. Any ideas for that fix is appreciated.?? The tree did a pretty good job of beating the up tin work, but its finally coming around. Using an oak block and pulling each panel over center-a little heat helps--then move to the next panel.

P2100117.jpg

Attached Thumbnails

  • PA260028.jpg
  • PA310032.jpg
  • P2100115.jpg
  • P2100116.jpg

  • Michiganmobileman said thank you

#2 achomesteader OFFLINE  

achomesteader

    GT Fanatic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8128
  • 867 Thanks
  • 2,231 posts
  • Location: Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Posted February 10, 2012 - 05:06 PM

Looks like you're doing a good job getting the seat back to it's proper shape.

You could use pop rivets in place of the spot welds. Don't worry about a rivet gun, just get some 1/8" dia. rivets 1/4" long. Drill 1/8" hole and insert rivet from outside of the seat. Drive the shaft of the rivet out then back up the rivet on an anvil and beat the rivet flat from the inside.

If you use a rivet gun and want the rivet flattened you'll need to remove the ball that's left in the rivet. It's easier just to do it like I said above rather than trying to drive the ball back out.
  • JDBrian and Toolpartzman have said thanks

#3 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

Toolpartzman

    Fun With Horsepower

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 7171
  • 468 Thanks
  • 1,280 posts
  • Location: Little Rock,AR

Posted February 10, 2012 - 05:25 PM

Looks like you're doing a good job getting the seat back to it's proper shape.

You could use pop rivets in place of the spot welds. Don't worry about a rivet gun, just get some 1/8" dia. rivets 1/4" long. Drill 1/8" hole and insert rivet from outside of the seat. Drive the shaft of the rivet out then back up the rivet on an anvil and beat the rivet flat from the inside.

If you use a rivet gun and want the rivet flattened you'll need to remove the ball that's left in the rivet. It's easier just to do it like I said above rather than trying to drive the ball back out.

Thanks Greg, a rivet may be the simplest solution. I'm hoping to re-weld it somehow so its not visable, but don't own a spot welder. Its a pretty large area-maybe 1 1/5" Sq and was wondering if JB weld would hold up if I could sand the inside faces and clamp it tight.

#4 achomesteader OFFLINE  

achomesteader

    GT Fanatic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8128
  • 867 Thanks
  • 2,231 posts
  • Location: Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Posted February 10, 2012 - 05:49 PM

I couldn't say about the JB weld as I've never used it. Maybe someone will be along shortly that's tried something similar.

#5 tinner OFFLINE  

tinner

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 961
  • 502 Thanks
  • 1,561 posts
  • Location: 20 Miles East Of Ding Dong, Texas

Posted February 10, 2012 - 06:29 PM

You're right about using tools from one trade for another. We used to say that if you don't have the right tool just get a round rock and a 2x4. I've used wooden blocks to form metal bunched of times over the years.

You might want to take what you need spot welded to a local sheet metal shop. They'll be glad to help you.

Good luck.
  • Toolpartzman said thank you

#6 caseguy OFFLINE  

caseguy

    Connoisseur of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 906
  • 1,624 Thanks
  • 5,600 posts
  • Location: Edinburg, PA

Posted February 10, 2012 - 07:51 PM

Just did a quick search and found this at Harbor Freight. If you already have a welder, it's an inexpensive solution.
Spot Welder
Mind you that I've never used one of them and can't vouch for their quality.
  • Toolpartzman said thank you

#7 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

IamSherwood

    Elf guardian

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2066
  • 8,379 Thanks
  • 7,696 posts
  • Location: Northern Ontario

Posted February 10, 2012 - 09:29 PM

Just did a quick search and found this at Harbor Freight. If you already have a welder, it's an inexpensive solution.
Spot Welder
Mind you that I've never used one of them and can't vouch for their quality.


That almost seems to good to be true.
Anyone have any feedback on these units?
  • Toolpartzman said thank you

#8 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,441 Thanks
  • 39,678 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted February 11, 2012 - 04:17 AM

Don't have a spot welder, but you can drill a hole thru one piece and weld the hole back up, thus making a spot weld of sorts. Of course, you'll have to umclamp and reclamp to drill the hole, probably a 1/4" would do the job. Material looks thick enough to do this.
Stephen, that spot welder looks neat. May have to check into that.
  • JDBrian, Michiganmobileman and Toolpartzman have said thanks

#9 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

Toolpartzman

    Fun With Horsepower

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 7171
  • 468 Thanks
  • 1,280 posts
  • Location: Little Rock,AR

Posted February 11, 2012 - 06:29 AM

I've seen those spot welders and they certainly look interesting--supposedly just plug into your existing welder's lead connectors and weld away. Yes Kenny, you may have a good idea-don't know what gauge but its about .080 thick and takes alot of persuasion
to overcome spring-back. I've got a bad diaphragm in my oxy torch, or brazing would be a solution.

HF also has a "pinch-style" spot welder with its own power supply-(more $$) I attended some classes once re: the pinch-style, small units for use on robotic arms. All I remember from it is that dressing the tips is critical,& clamping force, as well as power set-up in order to get the arc-puddle to form EXACTLY centered between the two sheets of steel, and those photos where we see a robotic welder blowing sparks from the joint are NOT tuned correctly. Just FYI.

Edited by Toolpartzman, February 11, 2012 - 06:52 AM.


#10 achomesteader OFFLINE  

achomesteader

    GT Fanatic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8128
  • 867 Thanks
  • 2,231 posts
  • Location: Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Posted February 11, 2012 - 06:52 AM

If it's about .080 it's 14 ga. A bit too thick for the above mentioned spot welder.

http://www.unc.edu/~...sheetmetal.html
  • Toolpartzman and Sawdust have said thanks

#11 tinner OFFLINE  

tinner

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 961
  • 502 Thanks
  • 1,561 posts
  • Location: 20 Miles East Of Ding Dong, Texas

Posted February 11, 2012 - 07:37 AM

14ga, that's mighty heavy for a for a garden tractor seat pan. They're usually about 20 or 22ga.
  • Toolpartzman said thank you

#12 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted February 11, 2012 - 07:41 AM

Some great info here guys. I have to repair the fender deck on my MF8 and Kenny what you said about making a hole in one piece and welding it might be a technique I can use. Thanks for the info guys.

#13 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,441 Thanks
  • 39,678 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted February 11, 2012 - 07:45 AM

I have used this method on thicker materials to add a bit more strength to welded parts. You could drill with a 3/16" and do several holes, depending on the overlap of the material. Even do one from one side, and another from the other.
  • JDBrian said thank you

#14 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

Michiganmobileman

    Old Tractor Addict

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5678
  • 1,235 Thanks
  • 1,842 posts
  • Location: Barryton, Michigan

Posted February 11, 2012 - 08:25 AM

I agree with JDBrian, some good info here, thanks for the tips guys!

on edit

Toolpartzman I saved a Cub Cadet from under a shrub once but yours looks like a tree grew through it. Wow nice save

Edited by Michiganmobileman, February 11, 2012 - 08:27 AM.


#15 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted February 11, 2012 - 08:34 AM

I have used this method on thicker materials to add a bit more strength to welded parts. You could drill with a 3/16" and do several holes, depending on the overlap of the material. Even do one from one side, and another from the other.


Kenny, now that you mention it I've seen this in some JD frames and on hitches etc where there is thick metal. They have some holes or slots in strategic places and weld the edges of the top piece to the bottom one. I had realized that it was to increase strength but didn't make the link to using that technique for thinner metal. Thanks again.
  • Toolpartzman said thank you




Top