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Grass in the garden


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#1 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 08, 2012 - 08:51 PM

I had problems in my garden last year, I had a foot injury and wasn't able to keep up my garden. Now I've plowed it under, but grass got in it really bad last summer. I would call it "wire grass" because of how it looks, but it may be called "bermuda grass" as well. Anyway, I got a lot of roots in the ground and I'm concerned that a lot of that will start growing again. Any suggestions about getting rid of this nuisance grass?

Thanks
Howard

#2 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted February 08, 2012 - 09:51 PM

If you have a tiller, you can till up what you've already plowed and that should chop the roots up to the point that they will not grow back. As a preventative, I use 6 mil black plastic sheeting. I cut a 12" circle where the plants will be. It greatly cuts down on the weeding. Others on here have mentioned using grass clippings or some other type of mulch to control weed growth.
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#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted February 08, 2012 - 10:22 PM

If the stuff is hard to kill, I would wait until the first warm, dry day and spray the whole shooting match with roundup.

Wait until you see it start to change color and then till it. You will probably end up with some, but it will at least kill off the existing root systems and give you a fighting chance.

I did this when we expanded the garden 2 yrs ago, made a big difference. I'll probably do it again this year.
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#4 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2012 - 09:04 AM

I'm a strong believer in mulching. All my grass clipping go into the garden to smother the weeds and grasses. Then you only have to worry about pulling the grass & weeds right in the row. That and tilling is how I fight weeds. The mulch between the rows have an added benifit in that your walking on mulch and not tracking mud back into the house. And it holds the moisture so you don't have to water as much.
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#5 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2012 - 11:11 AM

I've dealt with grass in my garden. It's nasty. I finally got rid of it, but then planted grass to keep the other weeds at bay while re-landscaping my yard. One has to be mindful of the neighbours, after all, and they don't need a fallow seedbed growing weeds next to their vegetables. Also, the soil back there is depleted and grass helps bind nutrients to the soil.

I'd use RoundUp, as MH81 suggested. It will kill everything that's sprouted. After that, deep tilling followed a week or two later by shallow tilling. If you save your grass clippings and leaves from the rest of the yard, use them as mulch between the rows, then till them in (shallow till) after a couple of weeks and lay down a fresh layer of mulch. In the rows between the plants, make sure you hoe. I know that nobody likes to hoe, but a few minutes a day is good exercise and helps keep the grass at bay. At the end of the growing season, RoundUp again, followed by at least one deep till. If time/weather permit follow that with a shallow, but thorough, tilling every couple of weeks.

If you're doing all that tilling anyway, you might want to add some nutrients. I like manure for that, although it tends to come with its own weed problems.
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#6 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2012 - 11:36 AM

I would follow everyone's suggestions here, unless you are chemical free. I use the grass clippings too and it does a nice job of smothering everything. Good luck.
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#7 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2012 - 07:23 AM

Thanks to everyone who took time to respond. I think I'll try to lay out some plastic or some tarps, should help control the weeds plus will also aid in warming the soil. Also, got a coupon from Harbor Freight, tarps are on sale. How does pine straw work as mulch? I've heard it tends to make the soil acidic, though I suppose it would be easy enough to add lime.

#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2012 - 09:53 AM

Pine straw is commonly used as mulch where it is available, especially in landscaping. Not commonly available in my area though.
Yes I suspect it is high acid, wish I had some to put around my blueberries. If you use it you might want to take soil samples after a year and see if ag-lime needs to be added to your soil.

#9 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2012 - 10:14 AM

The best thing to have done would have been spray with roundup last fall and then plow 2 weeks later. That would have killed 99.9% of your weeds. They probably seeded so you may want to spray when they come up this spring. Just do the spraying when you are not going to get any rain for 24 hour and add a bit of surfactant to your spray. This will help the roundup get though the waxy coating on the plant leaves and get a quicker burn down. I believe some variations of roundup already has surfactant premixed. Check labels for surfactant as an ingredient and it may be labeled "quick acting".
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#10 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2012 - 10:41 AM

Ducky, it was about all I could do to get it plowed under. This foot injury has been very slow to heal and has had an impact on my energy and mobility. I assumed that plowing it would be good enough, but I've been learning this winter.

#11 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2012 - 10:44 AM

I sure hope you win the weed battle. Nothing worse.




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