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Starting 2nd Silage Pit Refurbish


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#31 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 09:52 AM

So for those of us who grew up making chop from wheat and oats, how do make silage in those pits, Daniel?

#32 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 10:01 AM

So for those of us who grew up making chop from wheat and oats, how do make silage in those pits, Daniel?


Just use the chopper to chop whatever the crop, be it hay, wheat, sorghum, corn,...the list can go on & on. We chop hay & corn. We used to always chop wheat, but the cows don't give much milk off it, so we switched to making haylage instead. Just chop it, dump it into the truck from the dump wagon pulled behind the chopper. Back the truck into the pit, cump...pack with loader, and keep on till pit is full or run out of crop. Cover with plastic, then tires to hold the plastic, and in 30 days or so you have well fermented silage. Of course you have to chop at the right moisture level to get proper fermentation. Lets see if I can find that chopping video.
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#33 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 10:20 AM

Ah. See we always fed baled hay and used dry chop to top up the nutritional level. Corn doesn't grow there, so the chop was always wheat with barley or oats mixed in. We kept it all dry to avoid fermentation.

#34 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 10:39 AM

Here's a pic of the tractor hitched to the chopper & dump wagon. You can see our other MF2745 to the right, hooked to the New Holland 1411 Discbine. Ready to chop hay.

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#35 GTTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 03:21 PM

Dan,
Back on the farm when I was a lot younger the silage was always stored in a silo, the bad part was climbing into the silo to shovel the silage out twice a day, suprising how much 30 milk cows ate in day. The gas released by the fementation would make the shoveler high if they stayed up there long enough.

Shoveling out the "used" silage wasn't so great either.

Edited by GTTinkerer, February 12, 2012 - 03:21 PM.


#36 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 04:48 PM

We used to have a pair of upright silo's. One was 40' steel, the other 65' tall concrete stave. Too much problem keeping them repaired, plus a hassle to fill. The pits are way & beyond easier. We have lots more capacity too. I sure don't miss carrying down the 5 & 7 hp motors (from the unloader) down that chute for major repairs either!
Dangerous in upright silo's too! Gas can kill you in seconds after filling.

#37 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 07:49 PM

Next to the smell of a field of fresh mowed hay, digging out corn silage was one of the best when I worked on a farm. Of course manure was way down on the list :smilewink:

#38 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 08:04 PM

Next to the smell of a field of fresh mowed hay, digging out corn silage was one of the best when I worked on a farm. Of course manure was way down on the list :smilewink:


For me, good corn silage tops fresh cut hay. When I opened the already refurbed pit the other day,......man did it smell sooooo good! Corn silage never makes me sneeze either!

#39 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 08:26 PM

May be this isn't the place to ask, but this city kid (live in the country now, and wouldn't have it any other way) doesn't know much about farming. What's the benefit to fermenting the silage?

#40 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 08:31 PM

May be this isn't the place to ask, but this city kid (live in the country now, and wouldn't have it any other way) doesn't know much about farming. What's the benefit to fermenting the silage?


Green chop doesn't digest well at all. Most of the nutrients/fiber will bind & pass straight through the cow. Fermenting breaks down the nutrients to make them available, plus the fiber becomes digestible. Green chop sometimes give the cows the squirts! Kind of like how you can have plenty of fertilizer on your lawn, but because there is no lime, the nutrients in the fertilizer are "bound up", and not available to the lawn grass. Fermenting is to silage, what lime is to fertilizer.
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#41 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 08:44 PM

Thanks Dan! Makes perfect sense now.

#42 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2012 - 11:45 PM

Hey Dan, when i was a young man we had dairy cows and cow calf herds around here but now we have huge hog confinements and 1000 head cattle barns. Sure miss the smell of fresh cut hay and silage. Sure miss the good ole days. Randy.

#43 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 06:30 AM

I'm glad you are getting the first row in. That's probably the slowest to set. Hope it continues to go well.

#44 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 07:43 PM

Set the 2nd level of block after lunch today. My neighbor has yet to deliver the 30 more blocks, as he's logging heavy before tonight's rain. He'll be here tomorrow as long as it does rain. No matter, as I have 70+ more blocks already to play with.

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#45 tractorman604 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2012 - 08:06 PM

What are your winters ushually like there Dan.In the picture i dont see any snow,or is the weather just cooperating for you.




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