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Anyone planning changes to their gardens for this year ?


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42 replies to this topic

#31 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 08:27 PM

i love gardens almost as much as engines and tractors.

Me too :smile1: Hope you guys/gals looked at the link about secrets of easy weeding , really good info , Al

#32 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 08:56 PM

Thanks Alc, read it and learned a thing or two and will apply the newly acquired knowledge this summer.

#33 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 08:59 PM

Me too :smile1: Hope you guys/gals looked at the link about secrets of easy weeding , really good info , Al


I checked that out and it was interesting. May think twice about running the tiller through the garden to weed after things are growing. Our garden is next to the channel that was dug when the subdivision was developed. They dumped the goodies dug up along our edge and bulldozed them flat. We have a peaty type soil with some marl here and there and have added quite a bit of sand brought over with my Brothers Kubota from his sand pile, also all of the yard and leaf clippings have been tilled in since I got the vacuum collector 3 years or so now. We added some manure in the fall of 2010 but did no other fertilizing and had a killer garden this past year. Our PH tends to be high and it does vary a little here and there, as said above some plants just do better in certain areas. When needed we pump water from the lake and pipe it down to the garden. Lots of free fertilizer there:smilewink:
Great idea for a thread Al, helps beat the winter doldrums:thumbs:

#34 HALFSCALE OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 10:47 PM

Don't do it! Make a plastic picker-upper for your tractor, the bio crap will make a terrible mess, and takes years to fully break down. I tried it, never ever again, thankgod I sold that piece of property, picking up bits of plastic was driving me nuts!


They make all different levels of bio degradable plastic, some break up in just a couple of weeks and others will last a couple of seasons. It needs sun light to break up, you can't turn it under until it does, we ,ve been using it here on the family farm for about 5 years and it works well enough. My guess is someone gave you the wrong plastic.
When it comes to veggies the deeper you can plow or tiller the better, even if you can sub soil every couple of feet, but you have to break the hard pan on clay base soil.
Family has been farming here on the same farm since 1736, we're one deed away from a Penn deed.

Edited by HALFSCALE, January 30, 2012 - 10:59 PM.


#35 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted January 31, 2012 - 06:51 AM

I'm glad everyone enjoyed the link about weeds, for years I would plow the garden then when it was time to plant just ran the tiller as deep as it would go ,then plant my seeds and if I was going to plant in a week or two I would get the tiller out and till as deep as it would go then plant the my seeds . No wonder I had such a good crop of WEEDS :wallbanging: Al

#36 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2012 - 08:28 AM

Neat little thing i learned from old timers is during the wet seasons use a plow instead of a tiller to dry out drowned gardens, after plowing let a few days to a week go by all the while checking the moisture content at least 6 inches deep, when it just begins to crumble after sqweezing it into a ball it is ready and till or harrow a seed bed.
Water has always been a problem for me, just about every spring my seeds end up rotting in the ground from all the rain and i end up spending the extra money buying plants from the local greenhouse, i keep saying i will use my no. 4 seeder but the weather makes that decision for me, i have changed the way i make my seedbed in the last few years due to all the water by growing on raised beds with drains at the end of each row so it zig zags between the rows slowing the water down minimizing erosion and nutrients loss.
I tried one row per rasied bed and found erosion exposing roots after weeding and had to add soil to compensate for the loss, 2 rows per rasied bed with a shallow gully cut into the center during the dry seasons and the drains at the end of each row pluggd to retain water. Raised beds has always has me worried because it drys out quick and requires a lot of work to build up the beds and takes away from th amount of crop that can be grown per feet.
The gardens are always being modified with slight changes due to the weather.
  • Alc said thank you

#37 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2012 - 08:38 AM

Waiting for spring,....

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#38 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2012 - 10:00 AM

Neat little thing i learned from old timers is during the wet seasons use a plow instead of a tiller to dry out drowned gardens, after plowing let a few days to a week go by all the while checking the moisture content at least 6 inches deep, when it just begins to crumble after sqweezing it into a ball it is ready and till or harrow a seed bed.
Water has always been a problem for me, just about every spring my seeds end up rotting in the ground from all the rain and i end up spending the extra money buying plants from the local greenhouse, i keep saying i will use my no. 4 seeder but the weather makes that decision for me, i have changed the way i make my seedbed in the last few years due to all the water by growing on raised beds with drains at the end of each row so it zig zags between the rows slowing the water down minimizing erosion and nutrients loss.
I tried one row per rasied bed and found erosion exposing roots after weeding and had to add soil to compensate for the loss, 2 rows per rasied bed with a shallow gully cut into the center during the dry seasons and the drains at the end of each row pluggd to retain water. Raised beds has always has me worried because it drys out quick and requires a lot of work to build up the beds and takes away from th amount of crop that can be grown per feet.
The gardens are always being modified with slight changes due to the weather.


I don't know if it would work in your case, but a guy down the road from me had a similar problem. He addressed it partially by building a shallow swale around his entire garden. It keeps the water from the high side of the garden from washing through during spring melt and heavy rains. During wet years he digs weeping tile in between rows (just deep enough to cover and easy to remove in the fall) to help carry excess water away too. He makes it so the tile is just covered. He's usually got the nicest garden in the area, so I figure he knows a thing or two.

#39 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2012 - 11:59 AM

You know, that's a good idear, i should try that, digging a shallow swale around the high side and fill the ditches with tile or something removeable to keep the soil from eroding away, any idear regarding what i could put into the ditches ? somethin to slow down the water but removeable in the spring ?

#40 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2012 - 12:59 PM

He just uses plastic weeping tile like you put around the foundation of houses. He wraps it in landscape fabric to keep the topsoil from washing into it. He hand-digs it in (loose topsoil, so pretty easy work) but a plough furrow would likely be about the right depth and would get you some seat time. In the fall he just pulls it up (there's less than an inch of dirt covering it) and piles it by the fence.

#41 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2012 - 03:27 PM

Reverend do you know why your neighbor pulls up the drain tile and fabric each year ? Is it so he can plow without worrying about digging it up,, thanks Al

#42 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2012 - 04:05 PM

I think it's both so he can till the whole garden and because he only uses it during wet years. We're low here, with thick clay soil, so when it gets wet it tends to stay that way. When it's dry though, like this summer is looking to be, we need every scrap of moisture we can get. You can usually start guessing how wet/dry it will be around this time of year by the amount of snow on the ground, but the tile would be too frozen in to remove until after the spring melt.

#43 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2012 - 05:40 PM

The gears in the brain are turning, im even thinking of rubber welcome matts with the holes in it, cut into srips and layed in the drain,




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