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Anyone planning changes to their gardens for this year ?


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#16 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted January 29, 2012 - 10:16 AM

Yeah, weeds are always a problem, especially since I got mad at Monsanto and try not to use Round Up as a result. They might not treat farmers very well, but their product sure works. Something I find works well is a routine. I try to spend 30 to 60 minutes a day during yard work as part of my after-work wind down. You can conquer a lot of weeds in half an hour.

#17 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted January 29, 2012 - 02:38 PM

I found this info on a web site that sells wheel hoes and hand cultivators , looks like waiting 14 days after tilling then a shallow 1- 2"cultivating right before planting the seeds will help with weed control . I think it makes sense and worth a try.
The Secret of Easy Weeding - Knowing when and how to weed.

#18 Saltydawg OFFLINE  

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Posted January 29, 2012 - 02:59 PM

A tip for pest control: Plant a few Marigolds at each end of your garden. It will help keep some of the bugs out, not all, but you will notice a definite decrease in pests.

#19 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted January 29, 2012 - 03:05 PM

Good tip Saltydowg , my neighbor plants a continuous boarder around their garden , after they die off at the end of the season she saves the seeds for the following year , she gave me a whole bag full to try for my garden this year , looks pretty too , Al

#20 grnspot110 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 29, 2012 - 07:31 PM

This is my answer to weeding;

HPIM0820 - Copy.JPG

Mulch! I use wood shavings from a pallet plant, free for the hauling. Mostly Cottonwood, I age them one year before use. ~~ Lowell

#21 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted January 29, 2012 - 08:12 PM

I do of the same stuff, I get wood chips from the city, let than set and run then through a shredder.

#22 HALFSCALE ONLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 12:11 AM

You have to watch out on an acid mulch for too long a period of time, unless your checking your PH and countering with lime. Or sometimes I'll put straw down , it adds potassium and sweetens the soil. Depends on your soil type.
A few years ago Dad and I built a pull behind plastic layer for a garden tractor, that took care of the weed problem. This year I'm going to use bio- degradable plastic ,so I don't have to pull it up

#23 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 04:45 AM

You have to watch out on an acid mulch for too long a period of time, unless your checking your PH and countering with lime. Or sometimes I'll put straw down , it adds potassium and sweetens the soil. Depends on your soil type.
A few years ago Dad and I built a pull behind plastic layer for a garden tractor, that took care of the weed problem. This year I'm going to use bio- degradable plastic ,so I don't have to pull it up

Don't do it! Make a plastic picker-upper for your tractor, the bio crap will make a terrible mess, and takes years to fully break down. I tried it, never ever again, thankgod I sold that piece of property, picking up bits of plastic was driving me nuts!
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#24 grnspot110 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 07:12 AM

You have to watch out on an acid mulch for too long a period of time, unless your checking your PH and countering with lime. Or sometimes I'll put straw down , it adds potassium and sweetens the soil. Depends on your soil type.
A few years ago Dad and I built a pull behind plastic layer for a garden tractor, that took care of the weed problem. This year I'm going to use bio- degradable plastic ,so I don't have to pull it up


That's the reason for aging the wood shavings! I also use wood ash, as needed, in place of lime. Been ding this for 25+ years on the same gardens. ~~ Lowell

#25 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 08:51 AM

Well I doubled the size of the corn patch when I plowed this fall, its roughly 50x100 now. So that means a lot more sweet corn, my daughter wants us to grow pop corn. I am going to try growing potatoes and sweet potatoes. I may build a raised bed and try some carrots.

#26 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 08:54 AM

Do any of you check the ph levels in your gardens ? I wish I had a sorce of free mulch , growing my own grasses for mulch gives me more tractor time so that's not too bad either , Al

#27 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 10:11 AM

Well I added another 50 X 50 section on to the main garden Now it's 50 X 100. Tomatoes go in a 40X50 patch next to the main garden and the melons and Pumpkins(that were in that patch are going out by the back fence to allow more room for tomatoes. I'm going to plant a separate patch for the Sweetcorn, the wife has big plans that don't include the sweet corn(way more potatoes and adding sweet potatoes. We are going to plant a lot more onions this year, and they worked beautifully in wide row beds(3 rows on each bed). Still debating on the popcorn, I do have enough area that I can get it far enough from the swwetcorn to prevent corss pollination.
My biggest concern right now is the fall planted Garlic & Shallots. I'm concerned that with the warm weather we are having this winter, they may come up and then get frostbite. It'ssupose to hit 59 today? I do have them covereded with about 6" of mulch.

#28 Lovintractorin OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 10:16 AM

Our soil gets tested. I haven't personally done it yet but my brother and Father have. Our soil is in such poor shape they we are just putting tons of compost on it to bring it out of the clay pot stage. But we plant certain plants in certain areas to make the most use of the PH levels. It is neat to see the how different plants react to different soils and where some do well, others do poorly. Fascinating stuff. My sister uses the PH meter for her cheese making mostly though.

#29 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 12:24 PM

Do any of you check the ph levels in your gardens ? I wish I had a sorce of free mulch , growing my own grasses for mulch gives me more tractor time so that's not too bad either , Al


Yeah well you are the inspiration, that has me planning to plant a bunch of mulch this year!

#30 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2012 - 03:31 PM

Mulching is the way to go i think too, tried straw one year with good results, harrowed it down before fall plowing over but the price skyrocketed soon afterwards so the straw was saved for horse/pony bedding, i still use the composted straw/manure mixed with food wast and lime it down in the fall along with wood ash, instead of expanding the garden like i was going to this year im retaining the original 16 x 30 top step and 10 x 25 bottem step (dug into hillside). hopefully if weather allows will be row cropping with my Planet Jr. no. 4 drill seeder, last summer i let a friend seed the garden and he did it the indian way,...in clumps !! mixed together ! very hard to weed clumps and he seeded waaayyyyyyyyyyyyy to many squash, had so much yellow and acorn squash i could not give it away fast enugh befor it rotted and i had to kill off a bunch to save the cucumbers and carrots, and tamatos will be grown IN the garden, not this lonely strip next to the fence (pain to mow around another odstacle) miles from the garden,...odd ?, was thinking instead of plowing with the David Bradley's 6 inch then roto tilling i was thinking of just harrowing in the straw/manure , light tillage, did not get to plant a winter green so the dirt is still bare with late fall weeds so those needs to be dug up, other then that not too much change.
Sorry to ramble, i love gardens almost as much as engines and tractors.




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