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Small Green house


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#1 Stimey OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 09:08 AM

I am working on a project green house using old aluminum windows, it is going to be 8ft. x 10ft. I am wanting to put a thermostatically controlled fan in as well as a source for heating. I think I have the fan figured out, but am looking for suggestions on heating. This is my first greenhouse build so any info would be great.

#2 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 05:44 PM

I don't start my greenhouse very early (just start some tomatoes & flower plants in it), but if I do need heat, I use an old oil filed portable electric baseboard type. Setting on the floor, under the end bench in pic: Gardens 2009 028 - Copy.jpg

#3 Stimey OFFLINE  

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Posted January 12, 2012 - 08:01 PM

How early can a person start with out heat? and what would you first start with? I really havnt looked into how early I can start plants, I know I would rather not have to buy my transplants this year. I am in zone 6 if that means anything.

#4 HALFSCALE ONLINE  

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Posted January 12, 2012 - 11:18 PM

How early depends on what you want to grow, you can start your cole crops , like cabbage, broccili, lettuce in Feburary or March
you can even start your first planting of tomatoes, because they get moved to a hot bed before putting out in early May
but all the early stuff gets started in small seed pods and then moved to bigger trays when they come up. Look at the duration time on your seeds and time it for when you want to plant in the ground or when the last threat of frost is in your area, for here in central Pa. it's around May 15th.
On another thread were talking about boiling maple syrup, I like to boil mine in my greenhouse, helps heat it and get something else out of the energy

#5 Alc OFFLINE  

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Posted January 13, 2012 - 06:15 AM

I don't have my small 10x12 greenhouse built yet but this thread will come in handy I'm sure . A friend has a hoop house that's not heated but what he did was mount some rope lights inside edge of a raised bed ( it's inside the hoop house ) and cover that with and extra layer of plastic when that temps get too cold .

#6 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 13, 2012 - 06:38 AM

Maybe I need to wrap the 'Tractor Port' with plastic so I can work in it. :bounce:
Make a greenhouse for me.

#7 Stimey OFFLINE  

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Posted January 13, 2012 - 10:25 AM

Maybe I need to wrap the 'Tractor Port' with plastic so I can work in it.:bounce:
Make a greenhouse for me.


I was thinking the same thing, I was fixing to tear this carport down to rebuild it, but just think 20 x 20? I could grow along with plants.

#8 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2012 - 09:58 AM

I was thinking the same thing, I was fixing to tear this carport down to rebuild it, but just think 20 x 20? I could grow along with plants.


I was thinking the same thing too untill the heavy snow and wind smashed it flat, oh well, still have the stack of old 4 pane windows that came out of the state hospital when it was renovated.

#9 speedyg OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2012 - 04:12 PM

On average how early of a start does a simple green house give you guys every spring?

#10 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2012 - 04:21 PM

My friend has a greenhouse up the road, mabey 6x8 all plastic, heats with a small electric ceramic heater, keeps the temp in the high 50's to promote hardiness in the plants, he can start just about 1 full mounth before i seed the garden, im in zone 6 so i seed around labor day,................ i need a greenhouse too,

#11 speedyg OFFLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2012 - 07:07 PM

Thanks trowel, I am on the edge at zone 4 we live at about 8,500 ft. My main problem is having to start to late in the year and our growing season is short as it is. I dint really want to heat a green house but wander if the green house itself would allow me to get an early start?

#12 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2012 - 07:54 PM

Your welcome, my season is very short too and during the rainy seasons i always end up buying young veggies to make up for drowned crops, a unheated green house will give you a good head start if you plant after the last frost and the temp is above 40, if you start everything on benches or tables off the ground on rubber mats and cover the seedlings with blankets, straw or spartacus moss when the sun sets you should be ok so long as the temp does not dip below 45 or so but when the seedlings are around an inch or two tall is when they are most sensitive to the cold and you still run the risk of them freezing, i usally start the cold weather veggies first, then gauge the weather from there. Im in Ma. up in the mountains so when the temp in Northampton, only 8 miles away, is 50 we will be around 40 and sometimes we see snow in April, rare, but it happens.
Another trick i do sometimes when i have the time is to start in a open top hot box surrounded in freash manure in the green house, when the plants are stronger then remove the hot box and mix in some of the manure and save the rest for fall tilling.
I hope this was not too much to read, i just like to grow, hope this helped you some.

#13 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2012 - 05:02 PM

Well guys, my gardening method will have a massive change this year! We just got the OK on a new place to call home (we ended up putting our house for sale and will be renting a place for a few years) We were sitting on a house bought at the height of the market, and 8 years later... it was worth 15k less than we still owed on it. We also needed more room and decided this was the way for us to go. Kinda sucks, but in the long run, it will be better!

The bad part is that the property is small (less than an acre) but there is a small garden there now, and the killer part is that there is a very nice, fairly new green house that is set in an over grown Victorian style garden. LOTS of potential for gardening, but I have never had a greenhouse before. I do start some stuff from seed like my tomato's and I have a large bucket of garlic started last year. My question is... I know we can start the plants off in there after a little while, but what about year round? What would be a good use for this in the summer? Peppers, herbs??

The nice part about the move for us, is the space! Our house was way too small for all of us (We have 5 kids, the youngest is our foster son) With this move, we might decide to take on another child, maybe in the younger range (4-8 or so) The house will cost us less per month than where we were living, and is a 1902 Victorian with 7 bedrooms. All the woodwork inside is the original oak trim and very nice as well.

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And the greenhouse... There is bubble wrap to insulate, the glass is perfect and no fogging to be seen.

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This will be the main tomato garden, but I will add to it, and maybe make border beds for some of the other stuff. I doubt I will ramp my my green bean canning as much as last year, but it might be a nice rounded out garden if I can grow stuff in the green house too.

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Tiny shed that I plan to fix up to house the Massey Ferguson, but it will require wider doors. Seeing as how the door there now, has no windows, and there is plywood over one window, I think custom build raised panel doors (25" dual doors for a 50" opening) will be allowed if I really fix the garden shed up nice. It's pretty solid, and could be really nice with some TLC

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That whole green house side of the yard appears to have been planted at one time. On the walk-through, I did notice a large patch of Thyme, so who knows what is hiding!

Sorry for getting a little off track! I really do need a crash course in how to best use my new green house!

#14 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2012 - 06:20 PM

FFEmt thats a really nice property you have there. Tons of potential and the shed will make a great garage for the tractor.

#15 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2012 - 07:42 PM

Thanks Brian! If everything is as nice as we hope, we have the option to buy it in 3 years. We are debating that, and might feel better after a few years. On the plus side, it's a very nice example of a 1900's Victorian with so much high end oak trim work it's not funny. It's in a quiet area right in the center of town. In fact, we can sit in the front yard to watch the fireworks over the river that is across the street. The down side is that I do not have a garage, but a nice basement shop with a great walkout doorway. (although, not ground level) The town is very nice and we are right off the downtown. The downtown is one of those 1900's mill towns turned into an antique district. There is also a nice park and river where the town put's on many events, and that is just across the street, and river that runs along the street.

Although... I have always wanted acreage and more of a farm setting. But, I really don't have the free time for it either. Lot's of things to ponder at this point in our life. But for now, just having all this extra room will be a God send!

Here is a photo from the real-estate agent. This is the view from the front porch looking out (there is a road between the house and that grass on the river bank)

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