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#1 Boss 448 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 07:12 PM

OK guys, when everybody is done laughing hysterically at this question I hope someone can answer it for me. While it will still be a while before I need to worry about this I figured I should start finding the answer now.

I have one of the China diesel 10 HP air cooled engines that I am installing in a Case 222. My question is once I have started the engine what the heck will I need to do to shut it off? I have looked at the skimpy manual I got and while it discusses the procedure for starting the engine there is no mention of how to shut it off.

I know that there is no ignition to turn off or ground out so the only logical way to shut the engine down is to turn off the fuel. I also believe that some diesel engines are equipped with an electric solenoid that allows fuel to the engine while energized and shuts the engine down when de-energized, though I see no such valve on this engine.

That leaves me to think that the throttle is set up so that fuel is not allowed to the engine until it is opened to an idle position so that it stops the engine when returned to the fully closed position. Does this sound right? I have not installed the throttle control yet but will need to take this into consideration unless I am missing something. I just don't want to have to sit around waiting for the engine to run out of fuel in order to get it to shut off.

Thanks!

JN

#2 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 07:25 PM

"That leaves me to think that the throttle is set up so that fuel is not allowed to the engine until it is opened to an idle position so that it stops the engine when returned to the fully closed position. Does this sound right? I have not installed the throttle control yet but will need to take this into consideration unless I am missing something. I just don't want to have to sit around waiting for the engine to run out of fuel in order to get it to shut off."

Yes this is very possible as I have a yanmar that works just that way. We have some China D guys out here and maybe they can give you a more complete answer.

#3 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 07:29 PM

This is a new one! Most folks want to know how to get it running. Check the fuel consumption, figure how long you want to run, and that's how much fuel you put in it.:bigrofl: Gotta be a way to shut it down on there some place.

#4 ckjakline OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 08:10 PM

I agree with ducky it probably shuts fuel off to engine when throttled back.You could also put in a fuel shut off .Alot of the big tractors you turn the keyswitch off then pull the fuel shut off to turn engine off.

#5 mikebramel OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 09:03 PM

Most likely the fuel will turn off at the lowest setting. Also, on some of those you can rig up the compression release and connect it to the choke cable

#6 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 09:23 PM

I would not put a fuel shut off before the injection pump. You will wind up with a hard to start engine or have to bleed the fuel system every time you shut it down and go to restart. If the injection pump has a fuel shut off incorporated into it then that is the way to go. Take a look at the throttle and see if it will not shut the engine down when you go as far as possible to the idle position.

#7 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 04:32 AM

It has the shut off built into the throttle / governor , most have only 2 settings wide open and off ,so when you touch the off tan, it releases the throttle ARM and it kills the engine. Your going to have to adapt this a bit ,but it will work nicely . :thumbs:

#8 Boss 448 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 09:34 AM

This is a new one! Most folks want to know how to get it running.

Kenny, I know. The only fear worse than not being able to get the new engine to run is not being able to get it to stop! Given the great fuel economy of a diesel it could be a long weekend riding around waiting to run out of fuel.


I would not put a fuel shut off before the injection pump. You will wind up with a hard to start engine or have to bleed the fuel system every time you shut it down and go to restart.

Ducky, I agree that a fuel shut-off in front of the injector pump would result in a vapor-lock type of condition when trying to restart later. I've read that air in diesel injector lines is a real b***h since air is compressible and won't clear the injector lines without being bled.


It has the shut off built into the throttle / governor

Skyrydr2, Thanks for that. I suspected that this was the case but could not find anything to confirm it. I'll need to study the throttle arrangement closer once I get more of the basic conversion stuff completed.

#9 jms180 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 09:48 AM

I am not a D guy but how does the fuel get from tank to engine if tank is lower than engine. If tank is above engine may work ok. Is there a fuel pump that comes with engine.

#10 Boss 448 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 10:00 AM

This engine has a fuel tank mounted on it that gravity feeds the injector pump. Where a tank is below the level of the injector pump then a fuel pump is necessary as is a return line for fuel that is bypassed in the injector circuit. On diesel engines that have an electronic shut-off solenoid I don't think that it shuts off the fuel supply to the injector pump but rather it acts like the old shut-off solenoids on carb equipped cars and closes the injector pump travel entirely when electricity to it is turned off, thereby turning off the fuel supply to the engine. Starving the injector pump by turning off the fuel supply to it could result in creating vapor in the system that could cause problems restarting as Ducky suggested.

JN

#11 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 11:18 AM

On one of my Kubota engines there is no fuel shut off. Neither electric or manual. My solution is to idle the engine down and pull the decompression knob. I've seen where people have expressed their concerns about damaging the engine doing this but none have been able to explain how this would happen. Some manufacturers recommend when cold starting to turn the engine over with the decompression engaged until the oil light goes out and then start using the normal procedure. This pre-lubes the engine before putting running loads on it. So I don't see what it hurts using it to shut down that way. I've been doing it for a couple years with no problems.

#12 Boss 448 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 12:16 PM

While not an expert I certainly agree with you Chris that it does no damage. If you think about it all using the the compression release to stop does is to lower the compression ratio below the point of ignition. Conversely (if I am correct) I don't think that a diesel engine will actually start while the compression release is active but rather it is designed to allow the cold engine to turn over fast enough to achieve adequate speed (and therefore compression and ignition) once it has been closed.

JN

#13 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 02:07 PM

Most mechanical pumps de-stoke the injector pump so it doesn't make pressure to the injectors, thus stopping Any more combustion. This is how it will work on that chindie. You won't like using the decompression lever, as it will Rattle your bones because it is allways trying to kick out so the engine will stay running .

#14 Boss 448 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 09, 2012 - 02:25 PM

Sounds like the logical solution will be to construct the throttle linkage with stop and run positions.

JN

#15 Boss 448 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2012 - 05:15 PM

Got my answer in a very well documented Yanmar manual for the 186F style engines. See my new thread regarding the manual. Thanks for the responses!

JN




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