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Electrolysis Rust Removal - My 42" Thrower Rebuild


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#16 joecdeere OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2011 - 10:39 PM

Bill, the Allis in my pictures isn't bare, every part was treated with phosphoric acid to prevent rust and to provide a good "bite" for the paint. I hate to use any oils as you will later be fighting that to get the paint to adhere.

FYI, I've done the molasses trick too, while it did work, it smells and as it ages it will stink to high heavens as does the solution after you try to get rid of it. I swear you can still smell it out in the woods where I poured it. If you're gonna try it, remember to get it from a feed store or such place. What's some in a store for human consumption won't work.

If you're playing vinegar will also work to remove rust. That's what I use in the water jackets of older tractor engines that need to be cleaned.

#17 JDAddict OFFLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2011 - 11:48 AM

Bill, the Allis in my pictures isn't bare, every part was treated with phosphoric acid to prevent rust and to provide a good "bite" for the paint. I hate to use any oils as you will later be fighting that to get the paint to adhere.

FYI, I've done the molasses trick too, while it did work, it smells and as it ages it will stink to high heavens as does the solution after you try to get rid of it. I swear you can still smell it out in the woods where I poured it. If you're gonna try it, remember to get it from a feed store or such place. What's some in a store for human consumption won't work.

If you're playing vinegar will also work to remove rust. That's what I use in the water jackets of older tractor engines that need to be cleaned.


That's a good point to make joecdeere, you need to make sure that all the oil is gone prior to paint. One thing about WD40 is that it is extremely good at "penetrating" into all the microscopic pores. (hence, penetrating oil). To remove I usually just use some acetone or lacquer thinner. Acetone / thinner will dissolve the oil and carry it away when it evaporates.

#18 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 04:21 PM

Thanks for the warm welcome! Good to see a fellow electrolysis believer!

It is so simple it is fool proof. I may never sandblast again!

JDA

olcowhands post on electrolysis gets lots of interest and at this writing I have my MF12H frame in the tank. I use both a std 12 charger and when necessary a 36 VDC golf cart charger. Its the only game in town.

#19 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 04:32 PM

I'm wondering how quickly that works... or maybe its as slow as......... well,
MOLASSES:bigrofl:

#20 Tinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 08:26 PM

I started using electrolysis this summer and really enjoyed how well it worked. It is rather difficult to use this time of year but I will begin using it again this spring. I may have to find a bigger container to soak large pieces in.

#21 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2012 - 08:48 PM

I have noticed my etank just doesn't work well when it's cold.

#22 jakenbake OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2012 - 06:20 AM

wow. that is awesome. looks like I have another project.

#23 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2012 - 06:37 AM

Welcome, jakenbake. Electrolysis works pretty darn good. I always use a battery between the charger and tank, seems to work better with the charger I have. Got some more things to do in it, but will wait for warmer weather. Don't want to take the chance of it freezing between uses. Plus it's a bit hard to get primer to dry this time of year. Come spring, we'll all be soaking parts.

#24 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2012 - 04:08 PM

Welcome, jakenbake. Electrolysis works pretty darn good. I always use a battery between the charger and tank, seems to work better with the charger I have. Got some more things to do in it, but will wait for warmer weather. Don't want to take the chance of it freezing between uses. Plus it's a bit hard to get primer to dry this time of year. Come spring, we'll all be soaking parts.


Kenny it is a good idea to put a battery in line. The battery smooths out the pulsating DC from the charger. Some chargers have very poor quality diodes that actually let some reverse current flow when they should be turned off. This will definitely slow down the reaction but when you put a battery on the charger the battery voltage prevents that from happening. My tank is upside down out beside the garage. Winter has put a stop to any outside work here!

#25 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2012 - 01:42 AM

i was just sitting here trying to imagine what Tulsa looked like frozen solid.:confuse:


Im going try this system this spring, i have a 300 gl plastic tank not doing anything here. i might like it betterthan blasting, as it could do the work while i was at work.

#26 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2012 - 07:32 AM

i was just sitting here trying to imagine what Tulsa looked like frozen solid.:confuse:

I should have taken pics a few years back in the last ice storm we got. Shut the whole city down for a few days. It weren't pretty.

#27 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2012 - 06:34 AM

I'd like to share an observation on cleaning the inside of a small gas tank. The tank off my M12 is quite rusted inside, and led to a couple of ideas I'm working on now.

It would be interesting if I could "galvanize" the inside of the tank for a permanent fix?
:laughingteeth:

To test this notion, What would happen with a galvanized piece as the cathode (neg) and a clean piece of flat steel as the anode.? I tried that and I'll add pics of the result later this AM. It does seem to work thus far.
I used a new , hot-dipped (not the shiny electroplated galvanized bolts) anchor bolt for the donor and a piece of 3/4" flat steel for the anode. After a few hours, the area I cleaned best on the flat stock took on a shiny coating and the anchor bolt turned more toward a black-grey. That shiny area seemed to bond well enough that wiping by hand did not disturb it.

Next, I'll will retest with a "properly" cleaned flat bar and try some abrasive on my earlier piece. If this success continues, I'll do the tank in the same way: i.e. use the tank as the
anode and suspend another piece of anchor thru the filler neck with sufficient insulation to prevent arching with the tank. (I have filled the tank previously with vinegar overnight and have 1 more cleaning to do before its ready to "coat")

#28 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2012 - 06:40 AM

This sounds interesting. I know I read somewhere in one post where the person was doing bolts with a zink coating. Not sure whether that was in our other thread or elsewhere. Hope it works out for you.
  • Toolpartzman said thank you

#29 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2012 - 11:07 AM

One problem I can see is that it may be hard to get all the surfaces of the inside to plate due to the shape. Also, if there are rusty spots they won't plate properly which will leave a weak spot. Just thought of something else - Will the zinc coating leach into the gasoline? If the idea is to cover up any potential leaks it may not work. Others here have used those tank treatment coatings to fix tanks. If the plating doesn't work you could always coat it I guess.

#30 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2012 - 12:17 PM

I wondered about leaching also, I'll see I guess. It does not leak as of now , but its thin. As far as good coverage is concerned, its just the lower 2/3 or so that's bad and I'm planning on using a round and bent "donor" in hopes of getting max coverage. May have to coat it later, but thats not as much fun.




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